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Recently I completed a full action Acraglass bedding job on a Remington 700, but it shot poorly, 2" plus groups. Back and forth to the range checking everything including swapping all the componentsl, but no luck.


Getting ready to throw in the towel, I removed the action for the umpteenth time and noticed a small dot of oil which had finally migrated down the trigger onto the bedding at the right front trigger pin. Wiping away the pin head sized dot of oil I could barely make out a tiny dimple in the bedding which was difficult to see without the proper light angle. The front trigger pin was protruding maybe .010”. I seated the pin, relieved the bedding and groups averaged 1/2".


It was a frustrating lesson and trivial to fix. If I didn't know it before, I do now, the slightest bedding issue can ruin accuracy and takes a real thorough inspection before you move on to other causes.
 

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Yep...…… The easier "it" looks, the harder it really is.


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The trigger mounting pins on Remingtons have always been a problem. The early guns came from the factory with one hanging out the side. The other problem place is the bottom of the recoil lug mortise. If glassed tight and then anything gets in that narrow slot it throws the bedding way out of whack. That's why that surface should have clearance. (Cover the bottom of the lug with duct tape before bedding to create that space.)
 

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Recently I completed a full action Acraglass bedding job on a Remington 700, but it shot poorly, 2" plus groups. Back and forth to the range checking everything including swapping all the componentsl, but no luck.


Getting ready to throw in the towel, I removed the action for the umpteenth time and noticed a small dot of oil which had finally migrated down the trigger onto the bedding at the right front trigger pin. Wiping away the pin head sized dot of oil I could barely make out a tiny dimple in the bedding which was difficult to see without the proper light angle. The front trigger pin was protruding maybe .010”. I seated the pin, relieved the bedding and groups averaged 1/2".


It was a frustrating lesson and trivial to fix. If I didn't know it before, I do now, the slightest bedding issue can ruin accuracy and takes a real thorough inspection before you move on to other causes.

Add to that doing some serious research ahead of time saves you a lot of grief. Went down to Pendleton first time I bedded an M1A in 76. Did use ACRAGLAS and still go, but I went in with knowledge and patience to do it right. Still do, gas gun or bolt action. I wrote the using ACRAGLAS thing for Brownells.
 

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When I owned one of Remington's Model 700 rifles; I free floated the barrel by using a round wooden dowel of proper diameter. Wrapped it with a piece of coarse sand paper, and removed the high areas in the barrel channel, then used fine sand paper. Then coated it with some polyurthane to protect the wood. replaced the barreled action in the stock and this free floating the barrel much improved the accuracy.
 

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The most common bedding defect in ALL bolt action rifles is the magazine box being too 'tall'. There MUST be space between the mag box and the bottom metal to keep from bowing the action when the tang screws are tightened. About 90% of all bedding problems can be traced to the mag box.
 
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The most common bedding defect in ALL bolt action rifles is the magazine box being too 'tall'. There MUST be space between the mag box and the bottom metal to keep from bowing the action when the tang screws are tightened. About 90% of all bedding problems can be traced to the mag box.
When I re-bedded my Model 700, the first thing considered was the magazine box height. My particular Remington 700's magazine was of proper height, hence I was able to go ahead and float the barrel. I had another rifle, made in a different country, that I had to remove a slight amount of the magazine box in order to properly bed the action & barrel.
 

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Bedding is NOT easy and just putting resin in does not work. To pillar bed an action and get it right is not for the ones with no experience. It sounds easy but takes years and years. My first was amazing but I learned more and more, how to mask and remove squeeze out at the right time with tools to do no harm. Recoil lugs need relief at sides, front and bottoms, only the back is important. I seen factory bedding that looked like chewing gum --NOT!
 
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