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I have a number of Ruger No 1's in cal from 22/250 to 500 Nitro x 3".

The article follows a similar method to mine with the exception that I releave the forend contact with the barrel entirely and glass bed it to the hanger either side of the screw. Once the bedding is set tighten the hanger screw and check the contact of wood against the receiver. With fine sanding releive this area also.

Now we have a glass bedded forend with no upward pressure on the barrel and no backward contact with the receiver.

As a testiment to this bedding method my 22/250 has recorded a group of 0.21 and the 22PPC a 0.152. Both are factory rifles with factory barrels. Mind I have worked the factory triggers to a 6 oz letoff also.
 

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I have worked with 5 different no1's and a no3 bedding the forend and free floating the barrel and I will add one thing that I believe is very important for maximum accuracy..When checking for barrel clearance you should do it with the gun resting on its forend near the tip..in many cases the clearance will be checked with the rifle in an upright position and is fine, but due to flex in the hanger will touch the barrel when on a rest depending on how far out on the forend the rest is....What you can end up with is a situation where the forend has contact on some shots and not others depending on your resting point. This situation can actually be worse for accuracy than having barrel contact on every shot....Check your clearance like I said with the weight of the gun on the forend and you may be surprised...hope this tip helps...
 

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If you will remove the for end, Then look closely, there are three points to which you can class bed the fore end wood. Those three points are solid to the action and will allow the wood to remain floated.

First point is the under barrel hanger, then the ejector adjustment post and one spot on the opposite side.

This method works and provides solid mounting or the fore end wood with out contacting the barrel.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Most fellas I knew whom had No1's got rid of the fore end spring arrangement and mounted a block to barrel and simply attached fore end with a screw like some of the shotguns out there. Problem solved. As I understood it Ruger was aware from the get go of that upward pressure of the fore end spring assy issue...but soldiered on with it until the cease of No1 Production.
 

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gew98,

"fore end Spring" ????????

Have owned RUGER #1s for years and have yet to see a fore end spring.

The only spring under the fore end wood in a #1 is the spring that powers the ejector.

It does not effect the fore end bedding in any way.

There is, however, a way to solidly bed and fully float the fore end with no contact with the barrel.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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gew98,

"fore end Spring" ????????

Have owned RUGER #1s for years and have yet to see a fore end spring.

The only spring under the fore end wood in a #1 is the spring that powers the ejector.

It does not effect the fore end bedding in any way.

There is, however, a way to solidly bed and fully float the fore end with no contact with the barrel.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
If I remember correctly from the No1 I had many years ago the handguard mounted on an extension from the receiver which had a spring in it. This arrangement always caused upward pressure on barrel. The spring I'm thinking was not directly for mounting the handguard but it affected the handguard. The smithy I use anymore has doen many conversions of the handguard to mount them directly to the barrel by attaching a block to barrel and having handguard screw directly to it.
Not a hard fix he described to me but necessary to make No1 live up to it's potential. I never had much luck with my No1 in 45/70 to be super accurate and the 22-250 No1 my father had was a bit of a flop accuracy wise ( he traded that off long before he passed ). Did'nt know about the handguard fix back then , but many fellas told me over the years Ruger barrels were not quite the best. But then again I sold off all my dad's ruger rifles after he passed , 270 & 7,62x39 bolt guns in stainless as they just did not seem to put rounds tight like a rem 700 or savage 110 I had then. I kinda also don't care for stainless guns - too much pimp shine there.
 

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For every #1 I've owned over the years what you must be referring to is an under barrel hanger solidly attached to the action.

There is NO spring involved there is only the solid, non-moving under barrel hanger to which the fore end is attached with one screw.

As said earlier, there is only one spring under the fore end, and that is the small and short sprint that activates the case extractor/ejector. It has zero involvement with any fore end attachment.

However, there are three solid points, all attached solidly to the action to which the fore end can be bedded. Once this is properly done, the fore end can be fully free floated with the only points of contact being to those three solid action points. There would be zero barrel to fore end contact.

If needed, I can take photographs which would show the solid action points and their bedding in the fore end.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 
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