Shooters Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was interested in finding new tips and advice on how to increase accuracy. I recently bought a .308 and have been shooting a lot here lately. I am looking for tips and advice on how to be more accurate other than loading my own cartridges. I appreciate any advice I can get! Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Well, I think first off, practice would be the biggest factor. The more practice you get, the better your gun will shoot! I would also look around the 'net and see what you can find for shooting positions you haven't used or techniques you haven't tried and practice with those as well. A library or book store might help too. There is lots of literature on all sorts of shooting. Joining a club where you can get hands-on advice from more experienced shooters, or even entering competitions would help.

Of course loading your own rounds can help too. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
shooter88

there are alot of things you can do. First understand that you want to achieve precision then you can obtain accuracy. ie. basically you want to get the smallest group possible then worry about moving that group to your desired point of aim.

Solid comfortable shooting position
Breathing,
Trigger squeeze
The best hearing protection you can afford

There is a lot of good information on the web to aid in all these.

If your shooting open sights then sight alignment becomes critical.

You don't need to put 1000's of rounds down range to get better. When I worked with the markmenship teams we usually dry fired rifles and pistols 5 - 6 times for every live round down range. (make sure you have a snap cap, as depending on your firearm dry firing could cause damage) You can practice all these without firing a round.

good luck, There are tons of info on each item above so I will not go into detail as you can research this on your own as well.

Call your shots and keep records.

good luck
GF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Shooter 88,

You don't say what your experience with guns is--please forgive me if my answer is too basic:

You're likely going to get a lot of good advice here--some of it having to do with you (the shooter), and some having to do with the gun (what you shoot).

I think everyone is going to tell you that the shooter is the most important thing. My experience is that i joined an NRA affiliated club when I was a child around 60 years ago (I was lucky that my dad was the NRA Jr. Riflemen team coach--not everyone is that lucky), and I can't imagine learning to shoot without somebody who knows what they're doing being there. I don't think shooting is something best learned from a book. If you can join a club that has a range, especially if it has a teaching program of some kind (many are sponsored by the NRA), do it! And shoot often--with good guidance.

As for the gun. Again, you'll get lots of advice. My two cents: if you're going to work on the gun itself, start with the trigger. It's often the single most important thing you can do to make a factory gun shoot better. Again, ask somebody with experience to evaluate your rifle. A lot of new rifles now have fairly good triggers (unlike factory triggers a few years ago that were designed more to prevent lawsuits than to shoot well). If the trigger is too heavy, too creepy, too much overtravel, inconsistent--the first gunsmithing I'd have done is a trigger job--either have a gunsmith rework the factory trigger (usually not too expensive) or have a good aftermarket replacement put in.

After that . . . well, lots of things, depending what you want to do. Shoot minute of elk? Minute of angle (MOA)? Minute of prairie dog at 350 or more yards (probably not with a .308)? Learn competition/target/silhouette/tactical shooting and need a gun that's capable? Shoot benchrest for score or the smallest group?

After making sure the trigger is crisp and properly weighted for what you are using the gun to do, the next thing most would recommend is a bedding job (that will often also involve floating the barrel if it isn't already) unless the gun is a very good one and came from the maker properly bedded.

After that--well, talk to a benchrest guy, and you'll get your ear bent for a few hours (action work, custom barrels . . .)

Long before you reach that point you're going to discover, most likely that the thing you said you don't want to do will be necessary to get the most out of your gun: working up hand loads.

Where I live, there is a gunsmith that specializes in "accurizing". If you are not yet able to do it yourself, finding a guy like that might be a good idea.

It sounds like you're off to a good start.

Most of all, learn to be SAFE.
And then have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
practice with dry fire. call your shots. where was the sight/crosshair when the trigger broke. a good trigger makes it easier to call. if rifle has bad trigger, a good trigger will do more than reloads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the great tips. sorry Durangogun I have been shooting guns since I was 8 or 9 and I turn 21 this Sunday so a few years. I can hit anything is a shotgun I do a lot of skeet shooting I had a .223 that i used to use but never really go into rifle shooting the reason for that was because I didnt realize how much I love it! I was to go to a competition shoot sometime soon and just watch the other shooters and get as much tips as possible. but thanks again everyone for all ur help its very appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,246 Posts
Shooter,

If I'm hearing you right, you want to know what you can do, besides reloading, to improve the accuracy you get from your rifle. There are many things you can do, none of which will benefit you as much as spending time at the range with experienced benchrest/competition shooters who are quite often willing to share their thoughts and techniques. A lot of guys mention snap-caps and dry firing: I'm not really into that because a good bolt-action 22LR is the real thing and will certainly challenge your shooting skills, simply by increasing the yardage. The one piece of advice I give guys who really want to shoot their varmint or big-game rigs better is to shoot 10-100 rounds of .22 for every round of big-game stuff they shoot.

(Note: Shooting rimfire for practice is only effective if you're shooting properly, which means learning how to shoot better, not just shooting a lot more.)

With all of that being said, I think there is a great deal you can do with factory ammo these days. 25 years ago, the factory ammo was not nearly as accurate as it is today, nor did it offer the best choice of bullets for long range shooting or hunting. You can buy ammunition for you gun that is very accurate, but to shoot the number of rounds a competition shooter sends downrange, it will get a bit pricey. So, if you're going to shoot a LOT of good quality ammo, and/or you want the absolute best ammo for your particular gun, you'll have to break down and learn the process of handloading.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,370 Posts
slow dn..take plenty of time between shots..study what happened on each shot..i live where i can shoot anytime.. so when i decided to go long
without gadgets.. i took 2 shots a day an mulled over my results that night.. also kept a written record of it..
this ole fart got to the point i could go 400 yrds with confidense enough to use that in hunting..never did ,but i could have ..no more than 5mph wind of course.. finally got out to close to 500 yrds..but no use practicing that, as i won t ever shoot at game that far anyway..:)
but like i say slow dn.. take plenty of time between shots..
young as you are i know thats gonna be hard..but it worked for me.. good luck slim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Slim actually believe it or not Im a really patient shooter. I think like the marines 1 shot 1 kill. Quality beats quantity everyday! when I shoot I take a deep breathe and as im almost to the end of releasing it all I pull the trigger cause thats when all my muscles relax. I dont get the chance to shoot as much as I would like the only shooting ranges we have r fields! I got a lot of field to shoot in where nothing is behind ya for miles so its nice in that aspect.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
674 Posts
Assuming clean barrel, good muzzle, properly torqued to stock you want the best bullet for that gun. Find your twist and choose your bullets accordingly. Only one step in a long process but without it no matter what you do to anything else you won't get optimum accuracy with a bullet that won't stabilize properly.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top