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Hi all,
I'm new here and look forward to learning a lot from the more educated reloaders on here. I'm mainly interested in reloading rifle rounds at this time and have amassed almost everything needed to produce them. I was reading a post on her a couple of days ago that mentioned loading for a 30/06 which is what I'm starting with. The post went on and got into differing loads when loading for semi autos vs. bolt actions. I'll be loading for a newer model Remington 7400 in this caliber. (All of the other calibers I will get into later are all bolt actions.)
So I got to searching around and found that this appears true as far as pressures are concerned, so I need to learn a whole lot more before I start producing any loads for the auto. Is there a good book out there that all reloaders should read that will touch on more topics such as this? Thanks for any and all help. Chris
 

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I would stop and take a breath. You say you have components already. I think if I was starting again and my round was the 30.06 I would pick a bullet first. The bullet would depend on what you are shooting for. Target or hunting or a general plinker. Once you have decided on a bullet make, I would get the latest manual my that company. I like Hornady bullets. I would read it cover to cover. I would then pick a round based on your reading and buy the exact components for that round. once you have your component, including powder, I would buy the powder manufacturers manual and read it completely and see if that is the round you still want to make. Try to stay basic and not get fancy until you see what an old standby round for the 06 will do. These old loads for the 06 are old for a reason.
 

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In addition to a bullet-specific reloading manual for the bullet you will use, the three books I would recommend, in order, are as follows:

1) Modern Reloading by Richard Lee, 2nd edition
2) Lyman Reloading Handbook, 49th edition
3) ABC's of Reloading, 9th edition

The only thing you really need to be conscious of when loading '06 rounds for a semi-auto is that the slowest burning powders might not cycle the action properly. If you stick with a medium to fast powder (in the reloading manuals, this will be in the middle to top of the list of powders shown) you should have a load that is appropriate for your 7400. Also, you'll probably want to avoid any reduced recoil loads or any of the "light magnum" factory rounds. In other words, just use a tried n' true recipe with IMR4064 or a similar burn rate powder, and then follow best practices for bottle-necked cartridge reloading.

You'll do fine and if you run into any snags, there isn't a place on the web to get better advice than right here in these pages. Welcome!
 

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Yup. Stick with a medium burn rate powder. IMR-4064 is a good choice, one of the 4895s maybe second. That is probably one of the most important things with your 7400. I wouldn't load them up much past where they will reliably cycle. Rem autoloaders are known to eventually batter themselves to death.

Don't try to use brass that has been fired in other guns.

150 or 165gr. bullets should be great for deer. Good luck.
 

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"1) Modern Reloading by Richard Lee, 2nd edition
2) Lyman Reloading Handbook, 49th edition
3) ABC's of Reloading, 9th edition"

broom_jm is exactly right here. My exact list in the exact order.
 

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. . . Is there a good book out there that all reloaders should read that will touch on more topics such as this? Thanks for any and all help. Chris
What everyone has already said and . . .
I'm partial to the Speer and Lyman reloading manuals.

Also, a basic reloading tip for semi-autos and lever actions is to full length resize the cases. With bolt guns and cases that were fired in your gun, you can often get by with neck sizing. Always full length resize any used cases that were not fired in your gun then, you can fall back to the previous tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone. A Hornady manual was next on my list to get and now will also look at another to go along with it. I will be starting out with 150 grain Hornady bullets as well since I've alway thought Hornady produces quality ammo and components plus my first 100 are free with the dies I purchased. (can't beat that).
I've got the Lyman tumbler, Dillon press, RCBS electronic scales, Redding universal decapping die set, Hornady full length dies, RCBS case lube kit and about 300 once fired remington brass that I've saved over the years.
Still need the trimmer, calipers, Powder, Primers and a powder measure to throw onto my scales and will trickle if need be. Plus wanting a few other minor things as well. I'll definitely check into getting the suggested reloading books as well. Thanks again everyone.
 

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For a beginning reloader, it is my humble opinion that those offer excellent instructions on how get into the hobby with the least amount of confusion. Modern Reloading, especially, shows you what you need to know without introducing a whole bunch of advanced concepts, right off the bat. They are clear and concise, which I frequently fail at. :)

Any one of those three would be fine, really...but I listed them in that order, on purpose.

Catfish: Be sure to full-length resize the brass you've accumulated over the years, trim it all to identical length and sort by brand. If you have a good deal more of one brand than another, I would recommend trying to stick with just that one and get rid of the rest. For auto-loading rifles of any kind, consistency is the key to reliable functionality. In a perfect world, you would only shoot new brass, so that everything going into your gun is from, and for, that particular gun. Trying to use a hodge-podge of different brass, fired in different rifles, can lead to frustration when loads aren't as accurate as you'd like and/or the gun doesn't function as it should. If you FL resize the brass, then trim it, you should be OK.
 

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His thinking behind the order is probably that Lee’s book has good basic die adjustment information and observations. Lee also discusses other manufacturers loading tools some and he does not disparage anyone.
Lee has information on reduced loads and expanded information on subjects such as case trimming which is quite good.

The latest Lyman manual has a good basic section in the front and a good selection of full power hunting loads, reduced cast bullet loads and a good amount of reduced jacketed bullet loads. Don’t overlook the new 4th edition of the Lyman Cast Bullet handbook if you have any interest in light loads or cast bullet specific loading information.

The ABC’s of hand loading has articles on specific types of loading which will expand your thoughts on reloading.
Most public libraries have the ABC’s of Reloading and I would look there first.

While in your library look for - and if they don’t have it, request an interlibrary loan for - Townsend Whelen’s “Why Not Load Your Own.” This is an old book and the load data is obsolete but the description of setting dies and how they work is written in simple, easily understood language. Highly recommended book but look for it on a library loan before you think about buying it as you may find it too basic for your modern requirements.
 

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Thanks guys. I wasn't being a smart-a**, I was just curious. I like the Hornady because it uses pictures to help explain the reaction (for a loss of better words) once the trigger is pulled. I guess after your explanation, I would agree. Once he starts, he can then increase his library. At last count, I have 16 data and reference books on the shelf and still need to update.
 
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