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What's the best brass for reloading the 357 Mag.??? I normally use Win. brass for my reloads, but am curious about others.

Any good loads for 180gr. bullets from 6" Ruger ???
HD1
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Starline or Federal, that's all I use.

Lot's of people will tell you to use H110 or WW296, but I'd recommend 2400. It's a way more forgiving. Might be dirtier, but a way easier to work with. That's what I load for my 358421's out of my GP161.

RJ
 

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Never got 180s shooting good enough from my 6" GP-100. ANY 158s [jacketed or cast] were rifle-like using 2400 - 1.5" @50yds. 180s DID shoot best w/2400 instead of H-110 & Blue Dot....
 

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All the major brands are very good. I have no idea how to rank one "best."

Use any you choose, but do keep brass separated by brand as internal capacity does vary a bit. That affects maximum load levels.

I don't like nickel-plated cases at all. Repeated flare/crimp cycles causes the plating to flake off, and a flake of that super-hard nickel in your size die can ruin the die and gouge every case sized in it forever after. I know that from direct experience.

I stick to 158-gr bullets but my favorite powder for top-end loads with that weight is Acc#9.
 

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What's the best brass for reloading the 357 Mag.??? I normally use Win. brass for my reloads, but am curious about others.

Any good loads for 180gr. bullets from 6" Ruger ???
HD1
I had a shop that sold once fired by the spackle bucket, unsorted, for $10 a bucket. I must have bought about $100 worth, and sorted K's by headstamp and caliber. In moments of boredom, I weighed various brands and calibers, and found them all to be quite consistant. Most are not the same. In .357, most will go 10-20 cycles before splits and loose pockets are a problem. I have a couple sets of sorted brass that have lasted more than that with midrange loads, and they are still hanging in there.

If you're going to grab a couple thousand .357's for a lifetime supply, go right to Starline. It's a bit thicker in most versions, but it's very hard to wear the stuff out. Otherwise Winchester, Remington, Federal, and several others will be just fine.

For 180gr bullets, I've had good luck with 2400, W296, and Blue Dot. Blue dot has been the best with 180gr Penn TC's. W296 is tops with jacketed 170-180gr bullets, but I'd try AA#9 if you haven't spent a lot on powders yet.
 

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The difference between whatever is "best" and "worst" is so small as to be irrelivant.

The hotter loading data in any manual will provide all the power and accuracy you need.
 

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Starline if you are set on buying new. Otherwise, the best brass is the free brass that you scrounge or trade for or are given.
 

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I second that, about doesn't matter. That said, Star is considered to be very good and so is Fed...Winchester and Rem are OK too. The original spec for the .357 was a 158 at 1,500. You won't find anything like that being loaded or in any manual...btw, that was in an N Frame.

The problem w/nickle brass is well known. .357 brass is sorta hard to come by, but .38 brass is disposable...You find it everywhere and it lasts a long time.

I've seen, but never shot reloaded .38 wadcutter in mixed brass. Supposedly, the dif in impact is un-noticeable...at 50 yards. IOW, I suppose that it can be proved, but you'll need a ransom rest in order to prove it. Just like the theory that a .38 is more accurate in a .38, vs in a .357...but I've seen .38 ammo shot in a .357 can shoot 10 shot gps, in the area of 1 1/4 inches...yep the accuracy really stinks.
 

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John Linebaugh stated that Federal brass was the best and Winchester was twice as good as Remington, specifically, Remington was "half as good" as Winchester brass. I use Winchester and I believe Linebaugh wrote his article before Starline existed or was popular. I would buy Starline based on their reputation and the fact you can buy direct.
 

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IME, the best brass are those that are factory loaded, once fired, barely tarnished, left at the range along with the original box for me to salvage. To all of the shooters that do not reload, a sincere thank you.:D
 

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All the major brands are very good. I have no idea how to rank one "best."

Use any you choose, but do keep brass separated by brand as internal capacity does vary a bit. That affects maximum load levels.

I don't like nickel-plated cases at all. Repeated flare/crimp cycles causes the plating to flake off, and a flake of that super-hard nickel in your size die can ruin the die and gouge every case sized in it forever after. I know that from direct experience.

I stick to 158-gr bullets but my favorite powder for top-end loads with that weight is Acc#9.
I think Rocky's got some pretty good advice here. I use mostly Starline anymore but would not turn my nose up at other brands of brass. Some might stretch less but be more brittle or visa versa. Just get to know each brand of brass for it's unique qualities and you'll be in good shape.

With Beartooth 185gr bullets I prefer Blue Dot. 2400 or AA9 would also be good. I find H-110 to be a bit too slow for this bullet in my 4" barrels. YMMV
 

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I have lots of .357 brass avoid plated like the plague.

I shoot 100s each year using Rem and Win brass with 12.5 gns of 2400 and Win bulk 158gn HPs.

When it comes to a heavy load, I use Fed brass, Hornady 158gn XTP HPs and 16gns of 2400.
 

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Marshall: "IME, the best brass are those that are factory loaded, once fired, barely tarnished, left at the range along with the original box for me to salvage. To all of the shooters that do not reload, a sincere thank you"

Ahhhh,,no, no! Leave that "range" brass alone! It will make your front sight rust and the finish on your grips will get soft and sticky! I'll keep quietly taking that bad stuff away so others won't get hurt using it, it's a burden but someone has to do it and I'm tuff.
 

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. . . Ahhhh,,no, no! Leave that "range" brass alone! It will make your front sight rust and the finish on your grips will get soft and sticky! I'll keep quietly taking that bad stuff away so others won't get hurt using it, it's a burden but someone has to do it and I'm tuff.
Now THAT'S funny!:D:D:D
 

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As the others have stated stick to the standard brass cases when possible. I mean if you happen upon several hundred once fired at the range they are worth policing up. I have a set of Lee dies I use expressly for the nickel plated cases. They work fine and are not overly expensive if they get a scratch in them. I use them for both 38 and 357 loads.

With others I use mostly Starline, and have for many years. There is one bag which I use for simply punching paper that I haven't a clue as to how many times they have been loaded, but I have been shooting them for close to 10 years. They don't get the top end loads like my hunting stuff does, but even those have had several dozen loads on them with no issues.
 

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If you use moon clips:

Per TK Custom:

For competitors or defense shooters who use 38/357 moon clips: Avoid Winchester and Starline brass.

http://www.moonclips.com/cart/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=154&cat=%2E38+Special%2F%2E357+Magnum+%2D+5%2DShot+%3C%2Fp%3E%3Cp%3E+Small+J+%2D+Frame+Models%3C%2Fp%3E

S&W is now making their pro-series j frames (w/o the internal lock) for moon clips

See: http://shootersforum.com/showthread.htm?t=66793

Outside of the limited scope of moon clips, I find Starline and Winchester brass ok for my use.
 
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