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Discussion Starter #1
I want a cheap single stage that is still high quality i have a powder dispencer,scale, etc. I really need a single stage for ammo like .44 mag, , .38spl, 9mil, 45, and maybe .30 carbine. What do you reccomend? Are the Lee $30 presses any good?
 

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Some one use's this quote as a sign off, use it as a guide.

"The bitterness of poor quality is long remembered long after the sweetness of low price has faded from memory" Aldo Gucci

Look long and hard before you spend your money.
 

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There are lots of good threads about this question if you do a little research. Every reloader here has his favorite. I have used, Lee, Lyman, RCBS and now have a Hornady. All did what I asked without a problem. I bought the Hornady because they offered the free bullets that were worth more than the press so in effect, I got the press free. Lee is a good place to start if you are on a budget but you will get what you pay for. Best luck in finding your new press.
 

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The lee $30.00 presses are good to begin reloading perhaps to see if it's something you want to stick with and it will pay for itself the first time you use it. The $50.00 breech lock is much better and the classic cast is top of the line as is those from redding, rcbs, lyman and hornady....... Stay away from those cheap presses advertised as cast steel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I reload a lot ive got a rockchuker, and a turret but these stay at my pas and the progressive at my house is dedicated .223 so i want something at my house for pistol and pa wants the others presses there for him and i figure its the least i could do.
 

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In that case i would get the breech lock to speed up the changing of all those pistol dies. If you search around you can find it under $50.00
 

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" I really need a single stage for ammo like .44 mag, , .38spl, 9mil, 45, and maybe .30 carbine. What do you reccomend? Are the Lee $30 presses any good?"

Soontobe, "best"? NO. But for low stress cartridges such as those, yes, without question the compact little Lee "Reloader" is a great press. It will last you a LOOONG time if you keep the ram sorta clean and oiled. Even if you take back the larger presses later, the little one will still be quite useful as a dedicated decapper, etc.

Given the time involved in all the steps of a even a short reloading session from start to finish, and the fact that straight wall cases require only three dies that need - maybe - 40 seconds each to swap out and in, the time "saved" by the costly "quick change" inserts seems pointless even if they were instanteanous. Okay, the breech-lock bushings are cheap enough - for one set - but adding them to five 3-die sets will quickly get expansive to someone striving to hold costs down. And understand that we do NOT need to lock dies into a press with a wrench or pliers, that's also pointless and does eat time; all the dies need to be is hand tight in the press.

Enjoy your reloading and shooting but don't spend more than you need to. Don't fret the brand or color of your tools, they all work well or they wouldn't have survived in the market for so many decades. Some colors cost much more than is justified by the VERY simple things they do. We may never get more than we pay for but it's very common to get less than we pay for! ;)

(Are you headed for U. Kentucky? I have a "soon to be Wildcat" grandson headed that way this fall.)
 

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Best bang/$: Lee Classic Cast
Best: Forster Co-Ax.
Honorable mention: Redding Big Boss II and UltraMag
 

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I started with a Lee Hand Press. Dirt cheap at $20.00 and I loaded .357 Magnum, 30-06, 30-40 Krag and .375 H&H on it. I used a friend's Lyman Orange Crusher II to do the same. I also had a Lee Reloader Press and still have a Lee Challenger Press and a Lee Classic Turret Press.
They have all loaded everything I own from .22 Hornet to .416 Rigby. Neck sizing and full length sizing and I even necked down .375 H&H brass to .300 H&H when I couldnt find any .300 H&H brass.

Don't let anyone tell you that you can't make good accurate ammo on inexpensive presses simply because they arent Green or Blue or what have you. That's just silliness. Some of the most accurate ammo I made was for my .30-06 on the Lee Hand Press and those loads in that rifle will shoot under half an inch at 100 yards if Im not having a bad day.

Take your time, do good work and you'll be fine with most whatever you get so long as you buy from a reputable company. You just don't need to spend an arm and a leg to do it. Spend what you save on components instead.
 

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I reload since the mid 70, mainly rifles caliber from .243win up to 9.3 and many of the in between calibers... I started with the RCBS rchuck because at the time that was the only one available to me and never look back, I also use a LEE hand held press but only at range when I test new loads.
_______
roberto
 

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"Best bang/$: Lee Classic Cast
Best: Forster Co-Ax.
Honorable mention: Redding Big Boss II and UltraMag"

Jake, without getting into which press is "best" in any way, doesn't it seem all of those presses are vastly over strong - and costly - for single stages limited to loading Mr. Soontobe's handgun ammo?
 

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Have you considered shopping for a used press? Some people find that reloading is not for them so they sell off their gear at reduced prices after very little use. Since many presses are built to last several lifetimes, IMO these become great buys for anyone willing to accept used equipment. The press I'm using now was purchased off eBay and it's a quality press. You won't need a very strong press for reloading handgun ammunition, the need comes when someday you reload for rifles.
 

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13.5 Yrs, bench competition, 45 yrs of hunting loads, practice loads, one house fire, and all that time and reloading. One press, RCBS Rockchucker. Find a used one for a better deal, go for it. It won't be worn out, even if it was send it back and they will fix it.
 

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I have a Lyman turret that I started with 25 years ago, and its always done the job. But I can't argue with the other suggestions made here. They are good products.

Check and see if Midway USA, Midsouth, Grafs, or your local reloading purveyor is running a deal on a kit.
 

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13.5 Yrs, bench competition, 45 yrs of hunting loads, practice loads, one house fire, and all that time and reloading. One press, RCBS Rockchucker. Find a used one for a better deal, go for it. It won't be worn out, even if it was send it back and they will fix it.
I doubt that one could wear out any of the cast iron presses from Rcbs, Lyman, Redding, or Lee in a lifetime. Lots of folk complain about the Rcbs now being made in China and i am guilty of the same but if you have handled one you would realize that it is a beast of a press and as sturdy as it would have been if it were made in the U.S.A.
 

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I use a RCBS Rockchucker II and have been satisfied with it, BUT if I was going to replace it today, I'd go with the Lee Classic Cast. I believe it's every bit as good as the RC and costs lots less.
 

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"Best bang/$: Lee Classic Cast
Best: Forster Co-Ax.
Honorable mention: Redding Big Boss II and UltraMag"

Jake, without getting into which press is "best" in any way, doesn't it seem all of those presses are vastly over strong - and costly - for single stages limited to loading Mr. Soontobe's handgun ammo?
I listed these presses because of their features. All have efficient, effective, through-the-ram spent primer/debris handling to keep the press, bench and floor clean. They also do a better job of keeping the abrasive debris out of the ram-frame bearing, reducing wear.

All four feature at least compatibility with some type of die quick change feature, either the optional Hornady LNL press conversion kit, or the Co-Ax built-in, floating, snap-in/out, die system. This may or may not be an advantage for different users, but I find it very convenient (I use the Co-Ax)

Finally, all four have cast iron frames for durability, particularly resistance to wear in the ram-frame fit, especially if cleaning and lubrication is lax.
 

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If the $30 press you're talking about is the Lee Hand Held press, it's an OK press that can do most anything a bench mounted press can do. A Lee single stage, bench mounted press, the Classic Cast or Breach Lock are a great place to start. I don't think you'll ever wear one out...
 
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