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Check out the range I built, 1/4" AR400 targets sitting on road grader blades welded and concreted in the ground. I was raised on MIG and have a little one, stick welded those after 30 years of not doing it, that wasn't any fun.
Click on the picture to enlarge.


My friend Gary and I both have 1712's and Sako quads but use Tikka T1x's as practice guns, mine has the tan grip.

Kevin,
Are those targets 1/5 scale? What range are they at?
Back when the range had competition I shot AAA in small bore silhouette. My rifle is an old Remington 581 with a decent scope on it. It is by no means a target rifle but it is my hunting 22RF.
 

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Kevin,
Are those targets 1/5 scale? What range are they at?
Back when the range had competition I shot AAA in small bore silhouette. My rifle is an old Remington 581 with a decent scope on it. It is by no means a target rifle but it is my hunting 22RF.
Yes those are standard smallbore 1/5 scale targets, the topography/safety doesn't allow us to have a common firing point that's why they're all at the same berm. We move back the correct distances per target, 40,60,77 and 100 meters.

Fyi, standard rifle class guns are all but gone, pretty much everyone shoots one gun now, sporters in both hunting and standard rifle classes. I seen a couple of heavy barreled guns at the last nationals out of 150 people.
 

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Yes but there are many guns that fit in the sporter or hunting class that are more accurate than my old bolt.
The limit for the "hunting" class is 8.5 pounds and no thumb hole stocks. My little 581 has a pencil thin barrel and weighs under five pounds. It is an old squirrel gun and to its credit still allows this old man to shoot AAA with cheap CCI ammo.
Even at that the rifle is not my limiting factor - I am. ;)
 

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Yes but there are many guns that fit in the sporter or hunting class that are more accurate than my old bolt.
The limit for the "hunting" class is 8.5 pounds and no thumb hole stocks. My little 581 has a pencil thin barrel and weighs under five pounds. It is an old squirrel gun and to its credit still allows this old man to shoot AAA with cheap CCI ammo.
Even at that the rifle is not my limiting factor - I am. ;)
I started out with a 581 but got a used 541-S soon afterwords. It was a fluke but the first time I shot hunting rifle I hit 32 targets with that 581 with a Burris 6x I borrowed from my Hunter benchrest rifle. I struggle to hit 30 targets most days and that was 32 years ago.
 

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Check this out, Franz Albrecht can cycle the bolt as fast as anyone I've ever seen and pick an opening in dense trees to make a shot, incredible shooting. At 3 minutes in he cycles the bolt so quickly his knuckles hit the ejected empty as he's closing the bolt on a fresh round, that my friends is amazing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8g4dKVOo68M

he's on wild boar fever every sunday. I don't think I've ever seen him miss.
 

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he's on wild boar fever every sunday. I don't think I've ever seen him miss.
That's where I seen him the first time as well, there's 4-5 guys and a woman who are all very good running game shots on Wild Boar Fever.
He's doing an African show now, shooting half blind bovines off of tripods at close range, very boring.
 

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he's on wild boar fever every sunday. I don't think I've ever seen him miss.
I've wondered if we've never seen a You-Tube miss ?

But he's made enough shots to be forgiven for that, :)
 

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I've wondered if we've never seen a You-Tube miss ?

But he's made enough shots to be forgiven for that, :)
I'm sure he misses like even the best of the best shooters do, it's some of the hits he makes that are remarkable. If your a decent skeet shooter making those close running shots are not that difficult, I've killed plenty of coyotes that come charging into the call but they were all in the wide open or pretty much anyway.
Shooting running game in thick wooded areas picking tiny windows where the shot is clear would take years of practice for me and I doubt I'd ever be as good at it these people on the show.
 

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Back on topic to the OP

What design of rifle most lends itself to accurate offhand shooting? Or, what features encourage better offhand shooting?

As a still hunter/stalker, I get more opportunities that call for offhand shooting than most hunters I know. And since wounding an animal can ruin my mood for weeks, I want to be the best offhand shooter I can possibly be. In addition to practice I want to find the 1-2 long guns I shoot best offhand. Of course, I would prefer those guns to also possess the other attributes important to a still hunter, such as shorter length, relatively light weight, excellent handling, but I'm willing to sacrifice some of that to find the rifle I'm most accurate with.

Has anyone else been down this road? What features or overall style helped you shoot better offhand?
My advice , would be to use your gun that fits you best, I would think you should shoot it the best. Practice makes a huge difference in the results you achieve. Fit in a rifle is just as important , as it is in a shot gun. Confidence in your ability will increase with practice, practice. I use levers and semi auto rifles for hunting that I have used for decades with success. Moving shots are the norm, as pushing deer out of cover is the norm. Good luck.
 

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What rifle, what features, what style helped you shoot better offhand?

The OP then goes on to say he is a still hunter/stalker, and wants to be the best off-hand shooter he can be.

Practice which tests both the rifle and the rifleman, close to and beyond the point of difficulty, will reveal what the OP is looking for. It need not be live fire practice. Hundreds of quick rifle lifting presentations, target acquisition, sight picture (on a specific target) and trigger control exercises will entrain muscle/ motion memory controls that work, and if you push yourself hard enough, those exercises will reveal muscle/motions that do not work and are just wasteful, and you can train to eliminate them. This is assuming that speed is valued as much as accuracy.

Repetitions of quick lifting presentation, target acquisition and sight picture control will also reveal whether or not your rifle and sights are adequate for quick offhand shooting.

Sights and sight picture must be acquired naturally and swiftly. For those who prefer iron sights, and still have the vision to use them, the stock must fit the shooter.

Scopes must be adjusted for height and forward position, so that the sight picture is immediately right there when your head and upper body hits your natural shooting position on the stock.
You need a stock where you can hit your natural shooting position, almost instantly.

I think a scope in the 1x4 or 2x7 range, with long non-critical eye relief, adjusted to allow for heavy recoil, can be almost as fast as iron sights...faster if your vision is like mine. And then there is Eotech and Aimpoint.

I once jumped a young buck while walking through brush, and quickly put my sight picture on him. I held the crosshairs on him for several seconds as I watched him run, and then let him go. It was one of those things where time slowed down, and I perceived things in slow motion. What I remember was the slippery feel of the pressed checkering on the stock as I lifted the rifle. It felt as if it was sliding around in my hands as I brought the rifle up. Nicely cut checkering will help you with control when the seconds are split.

Jack OConnor gave some great advice when he said, **If you have time, sit down quickly, put your elbows on your knees, and turn your body into a tripod.**
 

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I'm sure he misses like even the best of the best shooters do, it's some of the hits he makes that are remarkable. If your a decent skeet shooter making those close running shots are not that difficult, I've killed plenty of coyotes that come charging into the call but they were all in the wide open or pretty much anyway.
Shooting running game in thick wooded areas picking tiny windows where the shot is clear would take years of practice for me and I doubt I'd ever be as good at it these people on the show.
Oh yeah, no argument here on those issues. If he missed every other shot, he's still make the list of better shots. And, they are a blast to watch.

Wonder though, what do they do with all that pork?
 

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Oh yeah, no argument here on those issues. If he missed every other shot, he's still make the list of better shots. And, they are a blast to watch.

Wonder though, what do they do with all that pork?
It's professionally processed onsite at most of those estates then sold to restaurants, there was a WBF episode that showed the process and explained it.

Franz Albrecht is a Bavarian prince, there's pictures of his wedding on the internet, very wealthy business man.
 

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Ah, a good thing.

I worked for a Swedish based company with manufacturing in Norway, Denmark, and Finland, (the Nordics are pretty "clubby" :) ) Half of all the meat you shoot is the property of the landowner, and they have the option to sell it to a restaurant or food service. Fresh road kills were the property of the landowner or local municipality. I was there in one of the countries often, and always had venison, caribou, moose, (Nordic Elk), and wild boar for dinner. And it usually costs less than domestic beef. Very progressive cultures.
 

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well, since i only use one hand(disabled), everyone of them!!!!!!

although i have shot deer two handed, i'd go with the old winchester m94(top eject).



last year it was a 30-30, but JES rebored to 35/30-30. this was sighting it in: 2 shots, move peep, 2 shots, move peep, 2 shots........
 

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I've only ever shot one deer running with open sights, about 75 yards away quartering away downhill with a 7400 35 whelen using a williams foolproof aperture sight. It was a tough shot, I didn't connect with him until the 3rd shot, he was running hard.
It would been much easier with a red dot or low powered scope.
 

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A rifle that feels right to you and lots of practice..Ive been practicing off hand shooting for about 75 years, and used a rest for 5 years before that! I got to the range and shoot bench rest , sight in etc. but before I leave I shoot about 10 shot fast offhand.. I hunt coyotes, Rock Chucks, and Jack Rabbits and most shoot off hand, If I miss a coyote or Jack, it disturbs me not in the least, we have plenty of both. Being able to shoot off hand has paid off many times over..
 

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I just shoot them all and practice enough to get good at 100 and 200 yards. Some say a rifle with a heavier fore end. I do better with lighter smaller rifles. But practice is the key. Some say time the figure eight wobble zone. I found I do better when I guide the rifle up or down the bulls eye(or across) and pull trigger on the edge as you approach it. Some call it approach shooting and many will go across at 7 or 8 o鈥檆lock. It鈥檚 a timing shot,
but guiding the gun gives you more control. I accomplish this by squeezing the rifle on a straight line down- on the second or third squeeze. When I first started shooting offhand I had a hard time getting groups at 50 yards. I really sucked.Now I shoot some 2鈥 in groups at 200 yards(NOT ALL-lol). But I mostly stay inside 8鈥 with all my shots at that range. Most of the time better than that. It all came down to practice. More specifically: holding the rifle firmly, pulling it into my chest with a good cheek weld, follow through and keeping my eye on the target. I do this regularly with my AR, my 30-30 and my 30-06. Practice, hold it firm so muzzle jump is minimal and you can keep a visual of target with follow through. It works. One more important thing. You got to start to call your shots. When you can call your shots you know you are progressing and not just wasting your time. You will often
make some bad shots due to muscle fatigue. That鈥檚 when you take a few breaths, maybe even rest your arms a bit and mentally regroup. Work at it and you will see results. I only shoot offhand now because I find it challenging. My next goal is to get proficient at 300 yards. Another
goal is to get inside a 3 inch circle 95% of the time at 100 yards, on my first cold bore
shot. You should eventually try to do the same. The first shot is everything some times. Be demanding of yourself to concentrate and get better.
 

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GSP7-- That .275 Rigby has my hormones tuned up!
 

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From reading and history:
The 'Standing Off Hand' shooting at game and Targets developed the cresent buttplate to a fine degree.
Shutzen also added 'spurs' at top and bottom to help position the butt properly for
accurate repeat shots.
Since Military shooters don't usualkly stand erect in battle the cresent buttplate
was replacved with the 'shotgun' buttplate on military rifles.
The 'shotgun' buttplate works better for prone, sitting or squatting and wiht added
support from sling it is very accurate in most shooting positions.

As a boy. I used a Winchester 1890 for walk-around shooting. it had a cresent
buttplate and was quick to shoulder and fire accurately while standing.

Chev. William
 
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