Shooters Forum banner

81 - 100 of 100 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
I grew up shooting off hand with a 25-35, shot my first few deer and elk with that gun, all off hand and under a 100 yards for the most part..I still shoot offhand a lot, at the end of a bench session always...I pride myself as an off hand shooter, I like a low power scopes or receiver sight and not adverse to a shallow V on the barrel..Ive won dollars betting irons against scopes at 100 yards..the trick is you don't deal with wabble with irons like you do with a scope as the cross hairs float past the targer and back and you tend to grab at the trigger...I think its a shame that most of todays "hunters" have never shot irons..I would not own a gun without irons and a scope option..I like the way a iron sighted gun feels to carry and to shoot and consider irons very effective to 200 yards, and under ideal circumstance they are effective at up to 300 yards. Practice it and give them a try, you'll like what you see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Big 5,
I used to shoot iron sights and practice off hand, unsupported, shooting. I lost the acuity with age and have to use optical sights beyond 25 yards - I could do better even at 25 yards but I am stubborn - so if you are blessed with good eyesight be thankful. Try to remember that some of us need the scope to see the target and the sights in the same frame of reference. It isn't that we are lazy, just that it would be dangerous for some of us to shoot without the scope.
Paul
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,570 Posts
In 1903 the Mannlicher Schoenauer 1903 in 6.5 x 54 introduced was introduced. End of discussion.
So very, very true. Scopes killed, though. Even the 1950s had open sight stocks and still no good and cheap way to mount a scope. They weren't meant for a scope.
This one has a 'flopper' peep sight by Lyman the bolt handle knocks it out of the way every cycle.

Whoa!! That's not my rifle. hold a sec. My rifle spent 101 years in un-airconditioned Florida but its not quite that crusty. Well, I guess it was. Same gun.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
So very, very true. Scopes killed, though. Even the 1950s had open sight stocks and still no good and cheap way to mount a scope. They weren't meant for a scope.
This one has a 'flopper' peep sight by Lyman the bolt handle knocks it out of the way every cycle.

Whoa!! That's not my rifle. hold a sec. My rifle spent 101 years in un-airconditioned Florida but its not quite that crusty. Well, I guess it was. Same gun.
Wish I could find one of those Lyman sights for sale. My old eyes have trouble with the open sights. Had mine opened up in the express style made them somewhat easier to make out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
What design of rifle most lends itself to accurate offhand shooting? Or, what features encourage better offhand shooting?

As a still hunter/stalker, I get more opportunities that call for offhand shooting than most hunters I know. And since wounding an animal can ruin my mood for weeks, I want to be the best offhand shooter I can possibly be. In addition to practice I want to find the 1-2 long guns I shoot best offhand. Of course, I would prefer those guns to also possess the other attributes important to a still hunter, such as shorter length, relatively light weight, excellent handling, but I'm willing to sacrifice some of that to find the rifle I'm most accurate with.

Has anyone else been down this road? What features or overall style helped you shoot better offhand?
I find the Mannlicher stocked rifles and lever auctioned rifles make very good still hunting guns. It has been my preferred method of hunting for the past 50 years. I can’t even recall how many deer I have taken this way. Most with a 20 gauge Ithica deer slayer with slugs. That was before NY started allowing rifles in my home county. I now have 3 bolt guns and 2 lever actions I use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Do not make that a Ruger International in 308. They don't perform well. Loved them in 243.
They perform pretty well in 250-3000 savage. One on my bucket list would be in 358 win.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I still hunt almost exclusively in the woods of Vermont and the best tools for me for fast target acquisition is peep sights and the safari style sling. i'm a winchester lever action fan so that describes most of what i hunt with. practice with whatever you're going to hunt with is key, with the sling on it, etc. The harder it kicks generally makes the second shot slower as well, so make that a consideration, but most often, the first shot is the best shot. Once you try the safari style sling with the gun hanging right in front of you at the waist, pointed in the right direction and with one hand already around the grip you will never go back to another sling. it rests much easier on your shoulders during a long day of walking and never slips off, and is ready to shoot at a moments notice. I have shot a couple of deer while sitting, resting my weary legs and/or eating my sandwich, but they are fewer than those on my feet. There's nothing like busting a buck out at 30 yards or less and getting your crack at him, make sure it counts and that you've been practicing. Some guns just fit better than others, choose the one that works best for you. Of all my levers, which are nearly identical in length of pull, weight, etc., my 307 just seems to be the fastest/best fit, rendering the most confidence for me. I've shot several with others, 30-30's, 7-30, and 356 but the 307 gives me the most confidence. I think it will be my first choice carrying this year....it's taken a back seat to others in recent years and is due.
happy hunting,
CJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I still hunt almost exclusively in the woods of Vermont and the best tools for me for fast target acquisition is peep sights and the safari style sling. i'm a winchester lever action fan so that describes most of what i hunt with. practice with whatever you're going to hunt with is key, with the sling on it, etc. The harder it kicks generally makes the second shot slower as well, so make that a consideration, but most often, the first shot is the best shot. Once you try the safari style sling with the gun hanging right in front of you at the waist, pointed in the right direction and with one hand already around the grip you will never go back to another sling. it rests much easier on your shoulders during a long day of walking and never slips off, and is ready to shoot at a moments notice. I have shot a couple of deer while sitting, resting my weary legs and/or eating my sandwich, but they are fewer than those on my feet. There's nothing like busting a buck out at 30 yards or less and getting your crack at him, make sure it counts and that you've been practicing. Some guns just fit better than others, choose the one that works best for you. Of all my levers, which are nearly identical in length of pull, weight, etc., my 307 just seems to be the fastest/best fit, rendering the most confidence for me. I've shot several with others, 30-30's, 7-30, and 356 but the 307 gives me the most confidence. I think it will be my first choice carrying this year....it's taken a back seat to others in recent years and is due.
happy hunting,
CJ
I like to rotate through my guns too. I try to shoot one animal then switch guns until I work them all in turn. Sometimes you shoot more than one if your luck is with you but I switch at the end of the hunt. Night before I take the next one out I sit and work the action and safety to refamiliarize myself with it. They are like old friends just takes a few minutes to get reacquainted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I just make it my business to shoot all my rifles offhand out to 200 yards(handguns 25 yards). Levers,bolts, ARs, open sights, scopes; whatever. For me it’s the only way to shoot; when I’m not sighting in, working up a load or verifying trajectories. Hunting rifle stocks were and still are designed to shoot offhand. With the exception of some rifles designed to be conducive to to supported positions, firearms are shaped to be shot offhand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I "snap shoot" whitetails with a old Winchester m94 in 30/30 with a "ghost ring" sight. I can shoot decently "offhand" with all my rifles. Jack had it right, there is a difference. I might be better shooting offhand with certain rifles, but I believe it is because they fit me like a extension of my body. It has taken years for me to be even just proficient as a offhand shooter, and there is still room for improvement.

My best advice, isn't to recommend a rifle. I recommend finding a rifle that fits you, feels balanced the way you like it, and comes to the shoulder and cheek without a thought. You will find that one rifle, that just simply feels perfect. What feels good to me, or others might not feel good at all for you. Even your choice of sights/optics will most likely be a different combo than what works for others. Good luck in your search!
It hasn’t taken me years, but I have to admit it did take going to the range 3 days a week; and lots of rounds. It definitely requires practice and concentration if you are not a natural. At first I had very large groups and misses at 50 yards. Now I rarely miss a pie plate at 200 yards offhand with all my rifles. It really did require a lot of practice though. And it still requires practice to keep that level of concentration and ability. That’s why I mostly shoot offhand. It’s rare that I shoot supported. Very challenging and fulfilling. Especially when one of the modern minded shooters ask you why do you shoot that way in a puzzled frame of mind. They’d never dare try to shoot offhand, and I’m starting to think they actually have no clue. Seriously, they actually can’t understand why I shoot offhand. Not only does that strike me as sad, but it is somewhat scary.Especially when it’s a range master or a guy claiming to be an instructor. What is this world coming to? LMAO One more thing: open sights are the best for snap shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
More people hunt from stands with shooting rails or window sills nowadays. I am afraid still hunting and snap shooting are becoming obsolete. Those of us that know the joy of jumping your quarry at 20-30 yards and then taking it with a snap shot will never give it up, but most hunters just don't hunt that way anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
A rifle that fits you well is a good start . If you can throw the gun up with eyes closed and then when you open your eyes you are looking straight down the sights , that helps speed up target acquisition and sight alignment .
A fast follow up shot is also a good idea so autos , pumps and levers are handy on not so dangerous game .
Next you need to study the principles of leading a target on the run . Practice Sustained lead and point and shoot techniques . US calls it Trailing and Trapping . Study the places you need to aim and the leads required for different angles that game can move . Sustained lead is moving the gun along with the speed of the target and then moving ahead of the target the right amount of lead and squeezing off as you continue the swing , don't stop the swing .
Point and shoot is watching the targets movement predicting a spot to shoot at that is the right amount of lead in front of the target when the target reaches a certain spot . There is no swing through just point and shoot at the spot .
When you have lots of room , ample time and no cover to contend with then sustained lead is the way to go.
If you don't have that luxury above like your shooting in a narrow clearing that the game will cross at speed then point and shoot . Like pick the spot to shoot at just as the game exits the brush and they run into the bullet . If you have a private place to practice get some old tires and put a target inside them and have someone standing well out of the way roll them down a hill , Swap sides so you get left and right swing .
Off hand shooting ( unsupported and snap shooting ) at stationary targets is different but still has certain techiniques that can help . I might go into that later .
My choice would be for less dangerous game something like a Browing BLR in 338 W or WM with a low mounted low power scope like a 2 to 7 x 32 or similar and build up the comb to get a good cheek position ( weld) .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
My own best hunting rifle for offhand shooting is a Rizzini 90L Express rifle chambered for .30-06. It is an O/U built on their shotgun frame. Fast follow up shot....yes.
It does have a scope on it as I can no longer see the irons reliably clearly. The iron sight rear is a single express leaf adjustable for windage only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
My own best hunting rifle for offhand shooting is a Rizzini 90L Express rifle chambered for .30-06. It is an O/U built on their shotgun frame. Fast follow up shot....yes.
It does have a scope on it as I can no longer see the irons reliably clearly. The iron sight rear is a single express leaf adjustable for windage only.
That type of gun would handle and point like a shotgun and if it fits you well would be a good gun to swing onto moving targets for sure . That's a nice gun by the way , around $5000 worth .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
The best practice for still hunting big game is hunting small game. Just ghosting along with a shotgun shooting whatever game offers a shot. Grouse hunting will teach you how to lead and the importance of follow through, rabbits will teach you to snap shoot, and squirrels will make you learn stealth and using cover to sneak in and close the distance. Don’t see a lot of hunters hunting small game anymore. Their loss.
 
81 - 100 of 100 Posts
Top