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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
They generally are garbage. They have a rebounding hammer that prevents the rifle from firing reliably. The new ones also fail to extract and fail to eject the spent case when they do manage to fire. The fail to eject and extract occurs about 85 to 90% of the time. The rifle is a pain to shoot period. My rifle had to be completely rebuilt just to get it to fire. I had to replace the extractor, grind down the lower rebounding hammer strut and replace the firing pin. I also had to replace the bolt as it failed to go home all the way when cycled with a live round.:mad: The problems that I have listed are common with new Marlin 39Aes. The internet is full of 39 owners that have these problems with their rifles, all you need to is undertake a little research. Avoid the new 39A like the plague you will be sorry unless you have gunsmithing skills and can rebuild the rifle then you may have a good one.
Cheers & Tighter Groups: Eaglesnester
 

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If that is really the case, then it is too bad. My 39A and 39M are '60s vintage and have worked well for me over the years.
 

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It is a true shame for such a quality manufactuer to have been driven to this through lawsuits. However that is no excuse. It was Marlins job to get it right and through their neglect and carelessness the customers suffer. The older pre saftey guns are as fine a firearm as have ever been built. Marlin is not alone in these slip shod practices. Seems all the manufacturer care about is quantity of guns produced not quality. Look at the new Smith & Wessons. Good god they are built out of plastic with stamped tin parts. The days of pride in workmanship are long gone. This is the reason I dont own any guns built after 1980. Most of mine are pre WWII, when a skilled craftsment built them one at a time from milled steel and walnut. Most manufacters employees are no longer machinists but are instead parts assemblers.
 

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I bought a new 39A and it didn't give a bit of trouble. I have to ask why didn't you return it to Marlin if it was a new gun with problems?
I am not trying to pick a fight, I cant even fathom you thinking. This man and MANY others have had problems with newer Marlin 39's. How can ANY buisness suceed with such failures of new products. I see this on many forums. People having problems with a new product and having to return it for service. Some of these people are so proud that the manufacture fixed it free. The point I am trying to make is why should we have to tolerate such slip shod workmanship. In a national magazine a customer tell a story about a major gun manufacter that had screwed the barrel in crooked (crossthreaded). This man was so proud that the maker repaired it! If you or I failed so often in our jobs would we even be employed? Marlin should be flogged with a wet chicken till they dismiss the CEO and get back to quality products. Glad you have good luck with yours but EVERY single owner should have the same.
 

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I think it's fair to let Marlin have a go at it before you start a smear campaign. Don't you? The only bad gun I've ever owned (out of hundreds) was a CZ. I sold it.
Its not a smear campaign Im talking about, its just hard to think that after we pay our hard earned cash for any product that we have to send it back to the factory to get it to function like it should have done before it was shipped. In another forum a question was asked of Ruger SR9 owners and if they had any malfunctions with them. Though a limited number of people had responded, their was a 44% failure rate. I know if I had a mere 5% failure in my buisness my compatition would have run me over and sent me back to the barn with my tail between my legs. Is is too much to ask any buisness to get it right or dont do it at all. I am not trying to start an arguement or demean or insult anyone or anything. Nothing is accomplished when that happens. Its just a problem that is not being addressed from my obsevations.
 

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Ok well I guess we shouldn't give Marlin a chance to make it right. Just jump on the internet and give them down the road. Maybe all the non-factory mods had something to do with the issues. We'll never know.
 

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My brother bought a Marlin Model 917 VWS and it was very poorly made. I was shocked. Tool marks all over the inside of the receiver. When you pushed the bolt in you could feel it sliding past the tool marks and the bolt would bind up and jam if you tried to push it forward by the handle. You had to use your thumb and push it in from the back of the bolt to get it to line up and slide into the receiver properly. He also had trouble with the clip catching right and if he didn't watch it very carefully and wiggle the clip and check it several times to make sure it was engaged, it would not catch and it would fall out on its own while walking through the bush. I have an older Marlin rifle and it is very high quality. It saddens and angers me to see how far American manufacturers have fallen! I have issues with Remington also. I have an newer 870 12 ga. Express and its not half the gun the old 870 Dad has. I LOVE my old Winchesters so I refuse to buy a new one so I don't taint their good name". I do have to say the CMMG Model MOD4SA I have is a quality made rifle, even if it is a "knockoff". Its made right here in the Heartland in Fayette, MO. I guess theres some hope left for American gun makers!:)
 

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Alas SIMONGIRTY from my examinations I must concur with you. Comparing older and newer model guns leave little doubt how far quality has fallen. I as well hand around OLD Winchesters and Smith & Wessons.
 

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That's too bad. My 39 is slick as grease on glass. Guess they just don't make them like that anymore..... got the hankering to buy another old one, now!!!!!
 

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Hey, Mike -

I've got a Mod 39 that was built in my birth year - 1937.

24" octagon bbl, case hardned receiver and star beside the 4 digit serial number.

We're both old and well used. This is one that gets passed down to the grandson.
 

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The new Winchesters are twice the rifle the old ones were. The Remington 870 Express is a reduced price model that functions flawlessly.
 

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I own ten Marlin 39's in various configurations, including a 1988, which is the first year of the cross bolt safety, and they all function flawlessly.
It's unfortunate you had a bad experience with a new one, but I see just as many happy owners on the web as well. The Rimfire Central Marlin section is a good place to go for stories on both sides, as is the Marlin Owners forum.
I hope you get your rifle fixed to your satisfaction, or get a replacement.
Good luck!
 

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eaglesnester is right

Eaglesnester is unfortuantly on the money. I have a 39a produced in 1981 which was given to me by my father(I was 14). It has worked flawlessly. Never once has it jammed, misfired,etc no matter what ammo I use.

Due to this experience I purchased my son his first rifle when he was 13, a 2007 marlin 39a. From day one it would misfire and fail to eject spent cartridge from chamber. The cartridge would be so tight it would take considerable effort to remove carefully with the combination of a sharp screwdriver and needlenose pliers. About every 5th shell would do this.

I returned it to the gun shop I bought it from and they returned it to Marlin with a detailed list of the problems. Received the gun back with no explaination of what was done. Brought it home and right away it did the same exact thing!! Either the people at Marlin who work on guns don't know their head from their ---, or they didn't even look at it. I tried every make of .22 ammo I could find and it made no difference.

Needless to say it is at a gunsmith shop right now and I hope it can be brought into working condition without to much out of pocket cost. I guess it doesn't matter, it is of no use to anyone the way it is now, and I would never trade and transfer problem to someone else. It's just so disappointing as I bought this and paid a hefty price hoping it would be something that would last my sons lifetime. Maybe so-Maybe nought, the jury is still out?
 

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NORTH1 I believe you hit the nail on the head with your comment about hoping to have bought a gun of a lifetime. Older guns were just that, built to last many lifetimes. In our family is a 22 rifle built in 1929 and is on its third generaton of use. Other than lack of bluing and finish it is a good as new. From all estimations it has at least 100,000 rounds fired through it. After WWII we as a nation became a disposable society in which quality was no longer a selling point. I have studied gun construction for decades and can attest and defend my statements. The net is full of unsatisfactory fireams haveing to be sent back for repair. I worked in a gun shop as a kid in the 1960's and can only remember one gun needing to be returned to the factory.
 

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FWIW - The Marlin Firearms Co of today is NOT the Marlin Firearms Co of yore - and hasn't been so, since it was purchased by (and became a subsidiary of) Remington Arms.

Any original Marlin employees left now answer to corporate bean-counters and lawyers.

.
 

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I bought a 39A a couple of years ago. It's pre Remington Arms so this may not be the case currently but ...

Not a single failure to function in what certainly must be four or five thousand rounds fired with a whole variety of .22 ammunition, from very cheap to pretty darned expensive.

Fit and finish on this particular rifle is what I would call very good to excellent. The walnut is some of the best I've seen on a production gun in years.

I know there is a lot of critizism regarding the accuracy of the rebounding hammer models but they seem to do very well over on the THR monthly callenges which are open to all model 39 rifles. If there is an edge one way or the other it's pretty hard to quantify, facts is facts. :)

Not trying to be contrary, just saying my experience has been the exact opposite of the OP.

Regards

DJR
 

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I had a new 39A for a while I bought it in 08, It would often fail to extract. When it did extract spent casings would often hang up in the ejection port and be ejected as the next cartridge was being lifted by the carrier, or bind up the action. I tried different brands of ammo, same thing would happen. I took it back to the dealer explained the problem, he took it back and gave me a credit on what I'd spent.

Thing is I'd still like to have a 39A, and there is a new one sitting on the same dealers shelf. I don't know? once bitten twice shy.
 
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