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New to the forums. Is there anybody out there with experience loading blc-(2) in .223 bolt guns?
It's my powder of choice in the .223 up to 55 grains. It gives good velocity, and meters so nicely out of a quality dispenser that you can't find a tenth of a grain of difference in thrown charges. No need of trickling all those tiny rounds. I use it in my 30-30 loads too, but it's pretty loud in a carbine-length barrel. Look for your post to be moved into the handloading category, it belongs there.
 

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For bullets of 50-63gr, BL-C2s one of the best powders going in a .223.

The next closest, in my experience is W748.

Both will almost always bring out the best of a good barrel, usually with loads at or near the top end of the range. If you're stocking a powder for more than one rifle, it also works well in my 7-08, .30-30, and .35 Whelen.
 

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I like it. The second best of the powders I've tried in my varmint rifle. (Savage M12 BVSS)
Like Tman said, mine liked it on the hot end of the scale.
 

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I've had good experience with it too with 40-69 grain bullets. My 223 has a 1:9 twist barrel and is a bit finicky about the bullet it will shoot but doesn't seem to care about the powder too much. Some will argue BL-C2 is not the best choice for light bullets but I've had nothing but good success with it. Another powder that I have had good success with in the 223 in H4895 but it is not generally associated with the 223. I have found it to be especially good with 63 grain Sierra Semi Point bullets.
 

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Another powder that I have had good success with in the 223 in H4895 but it is not generally associated with the 223. I have found it to be especially good with 63 grain Sierra Semi Point bullets.
OWEGO! Grew up on a small farm outside of Sidney, in Masonville.

Made many groundhogs "go away" with a .222 and 63gr Sierra's with H-4895.
 

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Looks like Masonville is about 60 miles due east of Owego. I live in farm country, I pass two dairy farms and two saw mills (less than 6 miles) between my home and my work place. Lots of open land. Lots of deer and turkeys. Not too many ground hogs ... mostly because I'm always on the look out. I shoot more crows than anything else.
 

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A few weeks ago I was trying out some different loads in my Savage .223 with 60 and 69 grain bullets. I used Varget, H4895, and BLC2. I got consistent 1/2 inch groups with all three powders with both bullets. Makes it hard to choose a "best" powder for my rifle. But the metering of BLC2 makes it a dream to load in those small .223 cases.
 

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T-Man,
I grew up on the other side of the hill in Walton. Growing up all I hunted with was a savage 340 in 222 loaded with BLC-2 with a 55 grain bullet. Killed my first buck with it using a 63 grain bullet (in fact a 4pt. didn't make it off Dads lawn opening day in NY this year do to that combo). Hate to date myself but my wedding reception was held at the Mason Inn. I sure miss living in Delaware county but make sure I spend a week up there for turkey season and again for deer season.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Appreciate all the input! I have used varget, and 748 with outstanding results. Was wondering about the "temperature sensitivity" of BLC-2, as most winter days up here can range from just above freezing to well below 0 degrees F.
 

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Appreciate all the input! I have used varget, and 748 with outstanding results. Was wondering about the "temperature sensitivity" of BLC-2, as most winter days up here can range from just above freezing to well below 0 degrees F.
I've had mine out in below-zero weather and didn't notice any ill effects. It's my understanding that high temperatures are likely to take your loads on a "pressure excursion". I've had mine hot too, and you'd probably need pressure test equipment and/or a chrony to figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Blc-2

Thanks for the temp info! I have heard that BLC-2 is very dirty and fouls quickly. Any truth to that?
 

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I've had good experience with it too with 40-69 grain bullets. My 223 has a 1:9 twist barrel and is a bit finicky about the bullet it will shoot but doesn't seem to care about the powder too much. Some will argue BL-C2 is not the best choice for light bullets but I've had nothing but good success with it. Another powder that I have had good success with in the 223 in H4895 but it is not generally associated with the 223. I have found it to be especially good with 63 grain Sierra Semi Point bullets.

Bingo, you hit on the powder (H-4895) my Savage likes best.


I've heard the samething about BL-C2 being dirty. It might be somewhat but at higher loads it don't seem to be a problem that I can tell..
 

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Appreciate all the input! I have used varget, and 748 with outstanding results. Was wondering about the "temperature sensitivity" of BLC-2, as most winter days up here can range from just above freezing to well below 0 degrees F.
Yes, BL-C(2) is temperature sensitive and you have to be mindful of near max loads you develop in cold weather and shooting them in hot weather. I had some I kept for an entire year becasue of the temp. I shot them up just recently when it was well below freezing. No problmes at all but when it was 80 degrees outside they we over the top.
 

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Thanks for the temp info! I have heard that BLC-2 is very dirty and fouls quickly. Any truth to that?
I think on the average, ball powders have a bit more graphite per lb, as there is quite a bit more surface area on those little beads.

Another factor is that ball powders seem quite a bit more prone to soot as you drop back on charge weight. I don't know if that affects accuracy, per se, but ball powders in my rifles never did well at the low end of the range. On the other hand, I've burned up as many as 300rds on prairie dogs in a day, without loss of accuracy, using top end loads. I never bothered with bullets less than 50gr.

The upside, you can fill your measure, and load a couple hundred cases with minimal to "0" change in dropped weight. A big advantage when loading a summer's worth of groundhog shooting.
 

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What are you thoughts and experiences with loads in a 22-250. I have a Browning a-bolt with a boss system on it. It loves 4895--Blc--h414--4320 pushing a 55grn.
 

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L&G,

About the temp sensitivity and fouling thing.
Tman has you steered in the right direction. GD's ball powder is sooty when run light, but it comes off SO easily, it isn't fouling like with extruded. The whole sensitive or not thing is so over-played, and Dependant upon so many factors. Blc-(2) & H335 are the same powder, just tightened the spec on allowable CaCO; talking half of 1%. There is also a good bit of info out showing that for all practical purposes, 748 is from the same parent. Remember the handloader shoots a blend of lots to make A powder anyway. So what a specific powder is, can be a bit enigmatic. And Varget is a terrible choice in the 223, as far as "stability" goes; so don't get overly concerned. Seek posts from a member Denton Bramwell, the good Dr. Has done a bunch of work on the subject.

Best wishes, and keep the belly draggers and crows nervous.
 

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I think you will change your message on temp sensitivity the first time you get sprayed in the face from shooting a load you developed in cold temp and discover it is too aggressive in hot weather. It will only take one time.
 

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Blc-(2) & H335 are the same powder, just tightened the spec on allowable CaCO; talking half of 1%. There is also a good bit of info out showing that for all practical purposes, 748 is from the same parent.
Well, learned a new one there. I've never been able to decide which one was a favorite, but some loads seem to work a bit better with one or the other. oddly.

I think you will change your message on temp sensitivity the first time you get sprayed in the face from shooting a load you developed in cold temp and discover it is too aggressive in hot weather. It will only take one time.
Thinking about it, I realized I don't think I've ever developed a load in cold weather. I know I shoot better groups when I'm not chilled to the bone, and I'm usually shooting the loads I developed in warmer seasons.

On a couple occasions I have flattened a few primers and experienced severe bolt resistance shooting prairie dogs. And a couple years back, I was calling predators in PA, and shooting my .243. It was a real warm spell in February. I don't even know how many came in a once, but I was loading/unloading my .243 as fast as I could feed it. I had the caller well out in front, and the wind was in my face. I fed up a round waiting for another shot as the foxes were alternately trying to find that rabbit, and kicking the butts on a couple foxes with marginal hits. With the heat waves rolling off the barrel, I took another shot and froze the bolt up. One of the few times I thought about an AR varmint rig. Nah.
 
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