Shooters Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Marshall,
You refer to a bore riding nose on a bullet, in your book. Would you consider the Keith style to be a bore riding nose? I'm casting from a 431244. Looks, like a 429421, only has a gas check groove.

If this is not suitable, what style do you suggest?  I also have 200Gr RNFPs, also sized .432. Want to lap 2 Vaqueros, a Super Blackhawk, and a Marlin.
Dan
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,439 Posts
A bore riding bullet has a nose that is designed to fit the tops of the lands.  The base of the bullet is sized to fit the grooves.  So for example, a .308 bore rider might have a .300" nose with the base being .308, .309, .310, or whatever fits that rifle.

These are generally not found for pistols.  The design lets the bullet sit farther out of the powder space without engaging the rifling.

Make sense?
 

·
Beartooth Regular
Joined
·
7,768 Posts
Hi, Humpty:
  Lyman has several bore riders. Goto:
http://www.lymanproducts.com/lymanproducts/Default.htm
Click on Casting, then Available Rifles Moulds .....  The 311332, 311284, 314299 and a few others are classic bore riders.

  Stick one of your bullets into the muzzle of your gun. If the nose isn't tight, it's not a bore rider. I don't have your combination, but the nose of a 357446 is very loose in the muzzle of my Highway Patrolman.

Bye
Jack
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top