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My CVA Scout 4570 has 416 stainless barrel. I bore sighted last night with a BSA colimeter with the arbors that insert into the barrel. I’m not exactly sure what type of metal the arbors are made from but some force was required to insert and remove the arbor into the muzzle. Could this damage the crown?
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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If you didn't use a hammer, I tend to doubt it. It would take a lot of hand strength to mangle a barrel!
 
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If you can see down the bore, there's no reason for a collimator. Collimator spuds should be hardened and ground smooth and won't do damage unless its' banged around, but simply looking down the barrel sure saves time, money, and is more accurate.
 
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I've been shooting for over sixty years, owned more guns than I can ever remember, and shoot more than 99.9% of most gun owners in America. To date, I have yet to use a bore sighter.....and never felt the need for one. JBelk is correct about looking down the barrel and getting the same result. I've met a lot of people over the years that think their gun is "all sighted in" right after they bought it. The sales person "bore sighted it". I realize you didn't imply this, and understand it's only ready to be sighted in. However, there is little or no error simply looking down the bore and seeing if the scope/sights are on target at the same time. Not being critical, just sharing. As for the crown......any small ding there can really effect accuracy. If I had to force something into the barrel, I simply wouldn't use it. Be very careful in this area. Let us know how it shoots.
 

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For those that have trouble looking for the CENTER of the bore when looking down it, insert a de-primed case and look through the flash hole instead. It is in sharper focus and easier to see.
 

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My CVA Scout 4570 has 416 stainless barrel. I bore sighted last night with a BSA colimeter with the arbors that insert into the barrel. I’m not exactly sure what type of metal the arbors are made from but some force was required to insert and remove the arbor into the muzzle. Could this damage the crown?
Yes, anything you "force" into the muzzle has a potential to damage the crown. Fortunately any damage will be visible & easily remedied. You wasted money getting a "boresighter", as others have said, if you just look down the bore, center it on a target downrange, then turn the scope adjustments until the crosshairs coincide you will be "on paper" & ready to shoot & do the final adjustments. Your break-open design is ideal for that method. Boresighters are worthless toys, IMHO.
 

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I use bore collimators regularly not all breechs are easily to look thru. Just bore sighted a Mk47 40mm automatic grenade launcher yesterday, sighting system is offset. Use them on M2 .50cals, 7.62mm Miniguns too. Your inserting a metal rod that is still softer than the barrel SLOWLY by hand. One bullet at pressure is to cause more damage that what your doing.


 

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I find bore sighters are quite useful, and more precise than eyeballing it. As long as I note where the crosshairs are on the grid, I can replace a scope, and rezero from my bench, and be off no more than an inch or two at 100 yards. Sometimes I have a perfect zero. I have 3 expandable arbors, and if you choose the right size and insert and remove carefully, no damage to bore or crown is done. Pumps, semi's and some lever's are impossible to boresight.

Bore sighting has it's value for field use, and if you don't have a bore sighter in your shop, it can suffice, but I don't see it's superiority over a quality bore sighting tool.
 

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Somewhere in my Tools I hav ea Small Laser unit that fits into my M1 Carbine Chamber
and shines through the Barrel, tha tI used to "bore sight' my Carbine before taking it to
an Outdoor range to shoot it the first time.

That shooting demonstrated it was Effective, as I only needed to adjust Elevation to get
centered holes on target.

I have not needed To use it on my M1 Carbine again since then.

When My Brother Got an M1 Carbine, I dug it out again and used it on his so he would
be close when he took it to the Outdoor range for 'sighting in later.

Saved us both a number of 'sighting Shot each.

Chev. William
 

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My CVA Scout 4570 has 416 stainless barrel. I bore sighted last night with a BSA colimeter with the arbors that insert into the barrel. I’m not exactly sure what type of metal the arbors are made from but some force was required to insert and remove the arbor into the muzzle. Could this damage the crown?
I have one (I'm a gadget freak) and have used it just to check if the scope that had already been sighted in at the range agreed with the collimator centreline, not really, it was off by half of a gridline, but it would have got me on the target reasonably close to the bull at least.

Before using it I looked at the method of fixing the gadget into the bore with those various sized rods that have the copper wire spring (looks something like an umbrella slide clip) and flattened the 270 one down a little with a pair of fencing pliers first so it wouldn’t take as much force to get it into the muzzle, it still had some tension so it worked ok and held the collimator in position and wouldn’t have damaged anything.

Some of the springs on the other sizes were a bit ordinary also, kinda pre-bubbarized and needed a bit of adjusting or reshaping, there wasn’t much consistency with the way they made them, I think there might have been about three that looked similar to one another.
 

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I have and use a Bushnell collimator with the expandable bore rods made from aluminum. Haven't hurt a muzzle crown yet, in a tad over 50 years.
As was mentioned above, it is a bit tough when dealing with semi-auto and slide action rifles when getting the optic lined up with the bore line, and then there are those dang muzzle loaders and scoped shotguns that shoot sabot slugs. As for me, the grid built into my collimator comes in pretty handy to get the cross wires close, of course unless the mounting holes were done with a hand-drill. Can't even imagine how peering through the bore that would be like when trying to align anything.
 

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Posts here sound an awful like those on the subject of Bore Snakes...lol. Some folks love the Bore Snake (like me) some say they are a ridiculous piece of crap....

I've used a mechanical bore sighter (collimator) for about 35yrs with what I consider to be excellent results. Personally, I think it more obtrusive to disassemble a lever action rifle to bore sight thru the barrel, but that's just this old crotchety fella.

I've had to use the old "tried and true" method on some rifles with somewhat odd bore sizes, like the 3 rifles in 9.3x62 I've owned along with the 9.3x74R double rifle I own. It works, of course, but it's no better nor nearly as fast as my preferred method.

A plus to the mechanical tool is that it can also assist in getting your crosshairs leveled properly. I simply mount the scope, set the eye relief and then plug in the proper arbor. The crosshairs corresponding to the collimator also pretty much ensures vertical and horizontal crosshairs being squared up. If you cannot get them squared together, your scope is likely canted a bit.

Everyone likes what they likes. You like Core-Lokts, I like Accubonds!! 😁
 

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There seems to be a misconception about arbors and pilots for use in barrels. They are HARDER than the barrel by design. They're also smooth and polished. This means they don't embed dust and dirt that can harm the bore. A soft part becomes a 'lap'. Hardened parts don't.
Be sure to wipe off anything going down the barrel before it makes the trip. The WORST metal for pilots is aluminum and brass.
 
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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Have used all sorts of methods to bore sight firearms - primarily bolt actions. Back when my eyes were younger, looking at a target through the flashhole of a deprimed case worked best. As time past, found the bore alignment tool with spud and collimator unit to be useful to at least get shots on paper at short distances. Then came the magnetic collimators that adhered to the muzzle with lit screens. By measuring center of bore to center of scope and adjusting the unit accordingly, worked fairly well. The latest tool is the lazer unit attached to the bore insert with proper sized plastic plugs. These have tapered shafts that press snug against the muzzle crown and the appropriate sized plug snug in bore. Careful installation will cause no harm to the bore or crown.
 

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Maybe the "steel" arbors, like those found on the Simmons, or Tasco, bore sighters, might harm the barrel lands at the muzzle when inserting improperly, but the 3 adjustable aluminum Bushnell rods never will, and haven't during the many years of my ownership. It's too dang handy to part with and serves the need perfectly.
I also have a laser bore sighter with a plastic spud, but that dang thing casts a red dot way too big to do any good. I like the grid inside my collimator rather than the "X" wires that some have.
 

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Have you checked that 'aluminum' arbor with a magnet. I have one of those sets and mine is hardened steel with a hardened steel wedge/expander. A needle file glances off.
 

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Have you checked that 'aluminum' arbor with a magnet. I have one of those sets and mine is hardened steel with a hardened steel wedge/expander. A needle file glances off.
Don't need to. The expanding wedge is surrounded by aluminum, on those that I have, anyone who has a Bushnell collimator, will notice that the spud itself is aluminum and that's what goes against the lands:

 

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So much for theories:



Maybe my smooth-cut file doesn't understand that it shouldn't cut "hardened steel", but it sure as hades knows how to cut aluminum very well. :p
OK, the internal parts of the spud are steel and that I agree with, and a magnet will indeed pass through the aluminum outer shell and detect those steel parts inside, but I can guarantee that the outside parts that touch the lands are indeed aluminum on my SPUDS. Even after use, the spuds will show a slight aluminum smear at the muzzle after being tightened up but that's very easily removed.
 

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Here's my steel version that files glance off of. This was bought about 1970.
 

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