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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks I just picked up a Boyds Spike Camp stock for my Savage Model 10 and I think I have a fitment issue. Until I replaced the original wood stock the gun was shooting sub-MOA even out to 300yds.

Today I took it out for the first time and am completely discouraged. At 200yds it is not shooting any group at all as a matter of notice the groups seemed to be opening up the more I shot it.

When I mounted it I checked and there was contact on the rear tang to one side. So after about 20 rounds I gave up and brought it home. Have it apart right now and I can see a small mark on the tang area, small mark in the area of the bolt release and a dent in the wood around the front action screw.

Now I have seem videos mention Bedding Black for inletting but is there anything else that I can use to substitute from a local store?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not what I was looking for. Used to mark the stock where it is making contact.
 

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Soot works pretty well. Try a Bic lighter and just lightly flame the bottom of the action. Should leave a thin coating of soot that will transfer to the stock in contact areas
 
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Candles work well to create soot. The cheaper the better. I did a Model 10 with a Boyd's and was pleased, but not familiar with the Spike Camp model.

Good luck and all the best.
 

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Auto parts store for a tube of Prussian Blue and a small acid brush to apply it. Thats what many of the pros use.
 

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You can buy Acraglas Black Dye from Brownells. Mix it in white petroleum jelly. The dye cost $5.99 for five small packs. One pack and a tube of Petroleum jelly will last a long, long time. I always preferred black over blue.

Frank
 

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Prussian blue is the standard stuff for inletting. Prussian Blue is actually an oil paint - the kind artists use. Available at art supply stores, as well as auto parts stores.
 

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You can buy Acraglas Black Dye from Brownells. Mix it in white petroleum jelly. The dye cost $5.99 for five small packs. One pack and a tube of Petroleum jelly will last a long, long time. I always preferred black over blue.

Frank
If one wants economy for dye in petroleum jelly, a large 8oz bottle of Rit clothing dye is less than $3 at the evil empire, and most craft stores.

Cheers
 
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"Prussian Blue" is a color as well as a product. It's sometimes called 'High Spot' Blue because that's what's its used for. The last thing you want is something that bleeds into the stock finish.
Jerrow's Inletting Black is sold to the trade for that specific purpose. It's black instead of blue and a quarter oz of either is a lifetime supply.

Good inletting requires good light and vision because the hi-spot goop has to be a VERY thin coat to be effective. The tendency is to gob on the inletting black so you see a lot of results. If the goal is to inlet tightly, the hi-spot has to be very thinly applied. Don't beat on the metal work, either. Just press the metal into the wood and carefully remove.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So I did a web search for both the Jerrow's Inletting Black and the Prussian Blue and found both. Thanks.

Now it looks like this will not be completed as quickly as expected. I placed the barreled receiver into the Spike Camp again this afternoon and found a lot of wiggle in the fit. So I am guessing it really needs to be bedded including Pillars. Now it appears the bushings I purchased to use a pillars are much too short so I will need to find suitable ones. Then start from the beginning!
 

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Here's a tip for your stock for a round action. (many are inletted too deep or too shallow). Take any square and hang it in the inletting. Half depth of a round is when the 90 deg. square contacts the bottom and both sides at the same time.
Rule of Gunsmithing failures -- glass bedding deeper than half is a permanent problem. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Take any square and hang it in the inletting. Half depth of a round is when the 90 deg. square contacts the bottom and both sides at the same time.
Sorry, not following your explanation. Just can't visualize it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Cannon Road surface Wood Flooring Gas
Cannon Road surface Wood Flooring Gas


This is the stock in question and this is my first time adding a picture so I hope it works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OK How did I end up with three of the same picture?
 

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I don't see any of them. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I don't see any of them. :(
You are right as now I don't see them either! I followed the directions in the FAQ so now I am confused.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Are they there now?
 

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yep. See all of them.
IF IT WERE ME--- I'd wrap tape around 1/4 wooden dowels and screw them into the tang screw holes and glass bed JUST around the two screws, holding the action in place with elastic bands.
Remove the dowels with vise grips, break the action out of the glass, clean it up and shoot it. It's no more complicated than having the action sit in the inletting without ANY stress on it...just held down solidly against a true surface. You make the surface 'true' by bedding in epoxy.
 
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