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Near the end of the black powder ear, were some powders made with incompletely charred wood as a base (rather than completely charrred wood..or charcoal). Reported to be an advancement in that they'd burn slower, allowing more velocity (at the same peak pressure) from the long barrels of the time.

Smokeless came along just a few years later, which prety much ended experimentation in black powder composition(at least until the modern black powder substitutes).
 

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Couldn't one add a small amount of very fine saw dust to a charge and get the same results? The gasses given off buy the wood dust would burn before the carbon in the charcoal and create a hotter burn giving more complete combustion. Just a idea------
 

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Couldn't one add a small amount of very fine saw dust to a charge and get the same results? The gasses given off buy the wood dust would burn before the carbon in the charcoal and create a hotter burn giving more complete combustion. Just a idea------
Hmmm. I'm thinking "not".
The reason for my thought is that BP is a very, very thoroughly incorporated mixture. The original brown powder - if it really did work as described - was produced the same way and was also thoroughly incorporated. Adding sawdust might increase the soot in the barrel but I am skeptical that it would do anything else. Would the sawdust actually burn the way that you think?
Don't know that it would hurt to try.

Pete
 

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Incomplete destructive distillation of wood leaves a number of the higher-boiling
tall oils left in the matrix. These oils might attract and make a conglomerated mass
of the KNO3 which might incorporate into the smaller spaces left in the wood matrix.
Similar to an abrasive slurry being worked into a lap.
Given that there would be a higher remaining Hydrogen content of the fuel .vs. full
carbonization, if the ratio of oxidant:fuel were not changed, i.e. same masses, then
there might be a slightly easier to ignite gunpowder produced. Many of the oxidized
species left in the char would react faster with the KNO3 than charcoal alone.
An interesting question. I'll look into my older writings to see if there is more mention.

Happy Holidays

BigMikeG
 

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following this thread...very interesting. I, too, have shied away from BP because of the "corrosive" nature. I don't even know if my favorite gunshop carries any BP. But, I might just look and ask if they have any. My shooting range is at my house, therefore thorough cleanup after a shooting session is just the next step after shooting. Accuracy is paramount, economy has to be number 2. I, frankly, don't have a good reason not to try it. For shooting a .50 cal inline(209 ptimer), should I look for FFg or FFFg?
 

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Bp

For shooting a .50 cal inline(209 ptimer), should I look for FFg or FFFg?
You can use either, though the vote normally goes to the FFg in calibers over .45.
Plenty of shooters use FFFg with perfectly fine results; reducing the charge 10-15% from FFg is the way to start.
I shoot a flint gun, .50 caliber. Very fine accurate with a PRB and 90 grains of FFg. If I were to try FFFg, I'd start with 75 grains of the stuff and see, maybe work up to 80.
Pete
 

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Some of the brown powders used charcoal made from partially burned rye straw. The saltpeter content of brown powder was in the neighborhood of 77-80 percent. The sulfur content was reduced, sometimes to zero. Brown charcoal was in the range of 18-20 percent.

Brown powder was used in the guns of US ships in the Spanish-American War.
Brown powder had some dangerous properties. It could ignite when handled roughly. After the war, stocks of brown powder were destroyed.

Google up Ammonpulver for fun.
 
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