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I have a Browning Sweet Sixteen that my Granddaddy gave me when I was a teenager and I haven't fired it since I was a little kid. There are two numbers that I have found; one # is stamped from the factory and I think it is the serial # .... 65###. However, based on the Browning website, if this is really the S/N then this shotgun is from 1903 - 1939, since it is in the range of S/N #'s from 1 - 228,000. I guess it's possible .... my Grandaddy died at about 80 years old in the late 1990's. I'm not sure where he got it (new or used), but he took great care of it and it's in great shape. It has a spare extra barrel .... I think one is full choke and one is a larger diameter (Open choke ?).

I'm planning to take it to a gunsmith to get it cleaned and to learn how to take it down, clean it myself, change the barrels, etc., and then take it to the firing range and teach my son (and daughter) how to respect firearms, firearm safety, and of course, how to shoot.

I know this gun might be valuable, and I'd never sell it .... it will be passed down as a working heirloom. But I'm curious ..... if that's the real S/N ... how much is this gun worth ?

The other number was hand scribed with a Dremel or similar, and it is 9 digits in a 123-45-6789 format. I think this is probably the gun license # from where it was registered.

Can anyone shed some light on this ? I'll get a good copy of the manual since I don't have one. But if anyone is familiar with the Sweet Sixteen, any advice / help you can give would be GREATLY appreciated.

You can send me an email to:

##########.com

Thank you, ......

Billy Leary
 

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Billy,

Welcome to the forum.

I altered your SN and your email address for reasons posted in this security thread. Any board member can email you through the board by clicking on your username and selecting to email you from the drop down list that pops up. I hope, however, they will post any useful information they might have here in the thread so all can see it.

Gun values are essentially impossible to determine accurately without a first hand inspection. Also, they vary from place to place and something that's cheap and plentiful out west may be scarce and fetch three times more in the east. The closest thing to an equalizer are the Internet gun auction sites. I recommend you search those for a past record of a gun as close to your own as possible and see what it sold for. Ignore the asking prices and bids of items still up for auction, as the final price may be substantially below or above those. Look only at already-sold records to get some idea what the market will actually bear.

There is a list of gun sales sites in this post by the late Bob Faucett under the highlighted gun value question.
 

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I'm thinking the number that was hand scribed might be someones social security number from the format. Just a hunch.

Iowaloha,
Cheezywan
 

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Welcome to the Forum

You have come to a great place. Glad to see you here. Unclenick gave you good advice.

The nine digit number may be someone's Social Security number. Years ago folks sometimes put that on their firearms for identification purposes.
Oberndorf
 

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Since you don't (yet) state the shotgun's manufacture date, I'll throw this in for thought.

If the gun has the safety button INSIDE the trigger guard instead of on the outside, and if the barrel isn't specifically marked "for 2 3/4" shells", you MAY have an older Sweet 16 which is chambered for a slightly shorter shell which was standard up until the late 1930s.

I've never fired one of these older guns with the regular 2 3/4" shells, but in theory the longer shells might cause a feeding problem, and will almost certainly have a higher pressure per dram of powder loading than the "proper" 2 9/16" shells would. Not sure that this will actually cause any safety problem--the Browning Auto-5 design is "Browning strong"--but it might cause functional problems or wear the gun faster than you would like; it might cause the lower pressure 2 3/4" shells to act more like high pressure shells in your gun. Since the gun has settings for low and high pressure shells, that might be an issue.

If your gun is an old one, this might be something you should take up with a Browning warranty gunsmith or ask a question about it on a specifically Browning-oriented shotgun forum. Or just shoot 2 1/2" Gamebore or RST 16 guage shells with the recoil system set up for low pressure. They are more expensive than the shells you'd get at Walmart, but they will work well and safely. I use them in a short-chambered Win Model 12, and they KILL just fine.

Just some food for thought. A Sweet Sixteen is always a gem! Two barrel sets are especially fine.
 

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Measure the chamber to see what the chamber length is, if it has been converted to shoot the longer shells it won't be worth as much as it would have been if it was in original condition.
 
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