Shooters Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I inherited a BSA Cadet from my brother. He had had it barreled in, I believe, .219 Zipper, but I recall that it caused him significant extraction problems, and the barrel was damaged.

I had it rebarreled to .222 Rimmed by a 'smith who said he had worked on Martinis. I think he exaggerated his experience.

Testing with light-to-medium loads, by the third round, the action had to be tapped open and it became clear that the primer was flowing back into the FP hole. (And accuracy was pretty pathetic, so there may be multiple problems.)

Figuring that the hole needed to be bushed and the firing pin slimmed down, I called Greg Tannel (Gre'-Tan Rifles) since he's in Colorado and is highly experienced in bushing bolts and installing more slender pins.

When I told him what I wanted, I think he tried to throw holy water and garlic cloves at me through the phone line. The short answer was that he had done it one time and never would again. Click.

Why is this such a difficult job?

Thank you,
Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,641 Posts
It really should not be, if the operative knows what he is doing. I had a 17 Remington on a Martini action and it fired thousands of rounds over a 20yr period before the barrel started to open groups up. The case was a standard 17 Rem configuration and only very occasionally did I get a hang up on extraction, which I am pretty sure was my fault for not putting the cases through the cleaner before loading. Was built by Clyde Moore in Michigan back in 1987 and was a tack driver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,387 Posts
A friend did one for me years ago and I don't remember him saying it was a problem. It had been converted to 218 Bee and needed a small diameter striker so he did it for me. In a weak moment I let it go and have regretted it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A friend did one for me years ago and I don't remember him saying it was a problem. It had been converted to 218 Bee and needed a small diameter striker so he did it for me. In a weak moment I let it go and have regretted it.
Did he turn down the original striker or make an entirely new one?

thank you,
Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,448 Posts
The bushing has to contact the bolt on two surfaces because threads aren't strong enough to prevent set back. It's a test of machining skills in a part that's not at all lathe friendly.
The bushing has a 'head' bigger than the the (very fine) threads of the shank. The bottom of the head and the the end of the bushing has to bottom out at the same time and then the bushing is surface ground to the breech face.
It ain't easy and ONE ruined breech bolt takes away all profit, inspiration and interest in doing another one.

Gunsmiths like Bob Snapp that specialize in Martinis have all the fixtures and tooling to cut the socket of the bushing and a cigar box half full of bushings ready to fit.

Here's some of Bob's metal work. Maurice Ottmar did the stock and I'm guessing that's Sam Welch's engraving.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,251 Posts
Gunsmiths like Bob Snapp that specialize in Martinis have all the fixtures and tooling to cut the socket of the bushing and a cigar box half full of bushings ready to fit.



Making it E-Z-Peazy to send him just the bolt (and FP) to work on - mailed directly, like a pair of sneakers (no other FFL involved).





.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The bushing has to contact the bolt on two surfaces because threads aren't strong enough to prevent set back. It's a test of machining skills in a part that's not at all lathe friendly.
The bushing has a 'head' bigger than the the (very fine) threads of the shank. The bottom of the head and the the end of the bushing has to bottom out at the same time and then the bushing is surface ground to the breech face.
It ain't easy and ONE ruined breech bolt takes away all profit, inspiration and interest in doing another one.

Gunsmiths like Bob Snapp that specialize in Martinis have all the fixtures and tooling to cut the socket of the bushing and a cigar box half full of bushings ready to fit.

Here's some of Bob's metal work. Maurice Ottmar did the stock and I'm guessing that's Sam Welch's engraving.
Thank you for an explanation I can understand, and the images of some beautiful workmanship.

A few years ago, I did check with Joseph Seeley about the work. Then, he quoted $200. I can't remember if I had contacted Bob Snapp, although the name is familiar. I'll have to check with him, also.

Cheers,
Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
The bushing has to contact the bolt on two surfaces because threads aren't strong enough to prevent set back. It's a test of machining skills in a part that's not at all lathe friendly.
The bushing has a 'head' bigger than the the (very fine) threads of the shank. The bottom of the head and the the end of the bushing has to bottom out at the same time and then the bushing is surface ground to the breech face.
It ain't easy and ONE ruined breech bolt takes away all profit, inspiration and interest in doing another one.

Gunsmiths like Bob Snapp that specialize in Martinis have all the fixtures and tooling to cut the socket of the bushing and a cigar box half full of bushings ready to fit.

Here's some of Bob's metal work. Maurice Ottmar did the stock and I'm guessing that's Sam Welch's engraving.
You are a very cruel man posting pictures like that!
I had just finished lunch, but I could not stop drooling looking at such beautiful work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
The bushing has to contact the bolt on two surfaces because threads aren't strong enough to prevent set back. It's a test of machining skills in a part that's not at all lathe friendly.
The bushing has a 'head' bigger than the the (very fine) threads of the shank. The bottom of the head and the the end of the bushing has to bottom out at the same time and then the bushing is surface ground to the breech face.
It ain't easy and ONE ruined breech bolt takes away all profit, inspiration and interest in doing another one.

Gunsmiths like Bob Snapp that specialize in Martinis have all the fixtures and tooling to cut the socket of the bushing and a cigar box half full of bushings ready to fit.

Here's some of Bob's metal work. Maurice Ottmar did the stock and I'm guessing that's Sam Welch's engraving.
Gorgeous rifle. I bet Maurice Ottmar was pretty ticked if he saw that chip in the stock, left side just behind the receiver.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,448 Posts
That gun has been around since about 1988. It's been hunted with and shown at many gunshows. It's a real beauty and showing its age.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top