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I've got a Ruger 77 ultra light in 257 Roberts. Had a trigger job, barrel recrowned and put it in a Brown Precision stock (glass bedded too) but have been unable to get it to shoot like I want. I acquired a Remington Model 7 in 7mm-08 that shoots lights out and has rendered the 257 Roberts a moot point. I want to rebarrel it to a larger, more powerful caliber and I'm wondering what will work in the length action I have. I was particularly wondering about the new 300 Winchester Short Magnum. Would this work or what would be my best bet in a 30 to 35 caliber cartridge? I'm leaning toward a 22 inch barrel and have always used Shilen. Is there anything better out there?
 

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Beartooth Regular
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The first thing you need to determine is what will be hunted with your revamped Ruger. If you're thinking about bigger game like elk or moose may I suggest the .358 Winchester? I personally prefer the .33 caliber to the .35, but that would entail a wildcat whereas the .358 Winchester is a factory round with ready-made brass.

I would not suggest any of the short action magnums from any source. I believe they are much ado about nothing, or at least very little.
 

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I think Mr Lester's recommendation is a dandy.  If a fellow is looking for versitility, flexibility, and a real thumper of a cartridge in a short action, then the 358 is a hard one to beat.

Versitilty for handloaders, as a fellow can load pistol bullets and shoot a varmint or two, has a wide variety of 180/ 200 grain deer bullets, some real good 225 grain  black bear and hog bullets, and some big thumper 250 grain jobs for bigger bears, elk, moose and the like.  Mine is nicely accuratte, the recoil is noticable, but not excessive, and my rifle is fairly light as well.

The only flies i see on the 358 is that range may be a limiting factor.  

As for the short magnums, I have my reservations about them, too.  Surely, a short action magnum has some advantages, and i do have a 350 Rem Mag, that i would not part with, but more because it is a 35 than a short action magnum.

Its funny, in respect to the 350, and to some extent the 358,  were both undermarketed, and that aided in their mutual lapse into shooter apathy, while the new crop of short actions are now all the rage, and on everybodies minds.  One thing we americans can do, i reckon, is learn from our marketing mistakes.

Good hunting,

Steve
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Measure the magazine length.

About 2.8" or thereabouts = .308 Winchester and it's decendents (including the .358 mentioned above).

3.35-3.40" or so, "standard" .30-06 length, so all of it's offspring.  .35 Whelen?

Between the two sizes that's a huge list of cartridges.

Anything "Magnum" means opening up the bolt face, or getting a new bolt = more $ and more time.

Have fun and good luck.
 

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I rather like the new 300WSM however I'm completely baffled by the choice of rifles it is offered in. Winchester recognized the desire for powerful cartridges that could be chambered in light, handy rifles; then introduced the line of short mags in standard length rifles. The Model 70 Classic Stainless in 300 WSM measures just 1/2" less than the standard rifle and weight is nearly identical. Remington wisely chose the Model 7 as its short mag platform however having two series [Rem and Win] of proprietary cartridges that are nearly identical is not only confusing but foolish. I too, will keep my 350 Rem Mag but I have a Blaser R-93 in 300 WSM that performs beautifully and has a huge size and weight advantage over any of the Winchester or Browning offerings with no sacrifices in performance.
 
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