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Hi, Folks:
Update on Canada's firearms program


OTTAWA, Dec. 27 /CNW/ - The Honourable Martin Cauchon, Minister of Justice and Attorney General for Canada, today announced additional measures for individuals trying to register their firearms before the December 31, 2002 deadline.

Licensed owners are required to register their firearms by December 31, 2002. On-line registration is free and available 24 hours a day at
www.cfc.gc.ca. Application forms are also available by calling 1-800-731-4000.

However, due to the high volume of calls to the Canadian Firearms Centre (CFC) information line and the high volume of e-mails being sent to the CFC, additional steps are being taken by the Department of Justice to ensure those
attempting to comply with the law are supported.

"There is no intention of penalizing law-abiding Canadians," said Minister Cauchon. "The Government of Canada is making every effort to assist firearm owners in meeting the licensing and registration requirements of the Firearms Act. These special measures will provide protection to Canadians who are acting to comply with the law. I encourage those who have yet to register
their firearms to act now."

Until December 31, 2002, licensed individuals who are attempting to register their firearms or who are seeking application forms may contact the
Canadian Firearms Centre in writing and submit a statement setting out their intention to apply for registration. Such a written statement will satisfy the
terms of the grace period announced by the Minister on November 29, 2002.

However, individuals who send a statement of intention will still be required to submit a registration form for their firearms.

In order to make a statement of intention to register, an individual must provide the following:
- full name
- address, and
- valid firearms licence or Firearms Acquisition Certificate (FAC) number.

Individuals may make a statement to register, in writing only, either by e-mail to [email protected] , by fax to 1-800-411-0622, or by mail postmarked no later than December 31, 2002 to P.O. 1200, Miramichi, New
Brunswick E1N 5Z3.

This is not an extension to the deadline for registration. It offers protection from prosecution under the Firearms Act and the Criminal Code for
individuals who are attempting to comply with the law.

The licensing phase of the program has been a success, 1.9 million owners have licences. So far, about 75 % of licensed firearm owners have participated in registration. About 400,000 registration applications have already been
submitted over the Internet, for a total of 5.7 million firearms that are accounted for, mostly rifles and shotguns, which were difficult to trace under
the old system.

Update on Canada's firearms program

http://canada.justice.gc.ca/en/news/nr/2002/doc_30792.html

Bye
Jack
 

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Perhaps we should get a pool going on how long it will be before the Canadian government decides to confiscate all these firearms being registered by their nice law-abiding owners. I give it five years, tops.
Mark
 

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Jack-

Just out of curiosity - are people complying with this registration thing, or has the majority of Canadian gun owners decided to not register? (Not asking what you yourself are doing). Seems to me that your mass registration is a pretty scareifying thang. Any movements to defy the law? Aagain, nothing specific or personal, just a general question.
DC
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Discussion Starter #4
Hi, Gents:
I can't say whether or not the majority are going to register. The government's numbers are pure fiction, at 2 million gun owners. It's more like 6-7 million. The Indians aren't, make no bones about it, and are fighting it in court. There's a million right there. There's a couple of very vocal groups that are not registering, and lots more that are just keeping quite. This registry would be dead now if a million and a half gunowners had sat on their forms up to now, instead of mailing them in up to two years ago.

Frankly, the Feds have me between a Rock and a hard place. The handgun registry has been in place since 1934 and I have registered handguns. I'm also a Firearm Safety instructor and we have to teach the kids and get them online, or we will lose in the end.

The registry's other big problem is money. You may be aware that the Liberal backbenchers refused to pass a money bill of $72M for the registry after the Auditor General's report came out last month. If they hold out the registry's dead.

Mark, you lose. The Indians figure they can drag it out in court for 7 years.

Bye
Jack
 

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Jack, I hope you are right about that.
Mark
 

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Then enter the American sportsman into this mess.
I am an American citizen and live in Utah.
I understand that rifles and shotguns may be brought across the border, but at a fee of $50 each.
And it is strongly suggested -- perhaps mandatory -- that you have those firearms registered with the Canadian government BEFORE bringing them into Canada.
Anyway, that's my understsanding of it.
Since 1971, my family has had a modest log cabin in the Cariboo region of south-central British Columbia. We always brought a rifle, or a shotgun and a box of slugs, for protection against bears and two-legged predators.
No one thought anything of it.
Last summer was the first time I went up to our cabin without any firearm. I'd been warned by others that I'd be turned away, if not arrested, trying to bring a firearm into Canada.
I know not to bring any handgun into Canada. I usually bring my 1895 Marlin in .45-70 or Winchester pump 12-gauge with a long barrel for protection at the cabin.
Lately, I've been wondering if an American citizen can purchase a firearm in Canada. And if so, could I leave it at my cabin to avoid taking it across the border each time, and paying $50 to do so each time?
I'm thinking that a 12-gauge pump or milsurp rifle (.303 or 8mm) would be good guns at the cabin.
The advantage of these is that they break down. Thus, I could hide the (rifle) bolt or (shotgun) barrel separate from the firearm.
That way, if anyone stole the firearm they still wouldn't have a working gun. This would greatly reduce or totally eliminate my liability.
Anyway, American hunters and travelers MUST be aware that the days of easily transporting firearms into Canada are OVER.
I predict this hassle will hit the hunting economy of Canada very hard, since many foreign hunters enjoy the bountiful game of Canada --- but now they won't want to go through the hassle.
Thank God I can still bring my spincasting pole across the border so I can catch a few rainbow trout.
 

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Gatofeo: It's a double edged sword and it sounds like you aren't aware that it is equally as onerous for Canadians to transport a weapon into the U.S. now. If we plan to hunt there we have to pre-purchase a hunting licence from the State we are going to. There is some provision for attending competetitive shoots as well but I am not familiar enough with it to comment knowledgably but think it involves getting a permit from BATF or Customs. Lots of U.S. people are still bringing rifles and shotguns into Canada and the fee is $50.00 Canadian which is closer to $30.00 U.S. . I don't think purchasing a firearm here is very viable for you as it requires testing, licencing, gun registration , permanent address for storage, safe storage requirements which are not met by hiding the bolt. I think the fee is a one time thing for a declared firearm but am not positive . It may also be possible to declare more than one firearm but I don't know for sure. It is important to also declare it on the U.S side and get the U.S. customs declaration so you don't run into problems taking it back to the U.S.. I suggest you do a web search for Canada Firearms Center as you can get the information you require on it.
Where in the Cariboo? I'm in Willy's Puddle. Maybe we can make a meet one summer. best
 

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I am glad I was born when I was (1947). I am not giving up shooting, but fear that my best days are gone. When the Canadian Customs officers give a Canadian peace officer a harder time trying to bring his evil high-cap magazines back into his own country than the American people do when he is entering the US, we know something is desparately wrong. Our government now has us over a barrel - register and have your guns taken away, eventually - or - don't register and take your chances on having some busy body rat on you and have them taken away anyway. Any of you that think there aren't people willing and waiting to squeal on us evil gunners is a fool, plain and simple. In part, we've done it to ourselves. Instead of pulling together, we've separated into finger-pointing factions of, "what do you need a MAGNUM handgun for?" and so on. I'm not trying to blame this whole mess on gunners, but we do need to mind our manners, now more than ever. My ex-mother-in-law (as an example) openly stated that she thought it was a good idea to "get all these guns registered". People like her would be on the phone to the police in a flash. Don't fool yourselves by thinking that there aren't cops who think that the gun registry isn't a wonderful idea, and will jump at any chance to take guns from people. It is usually the ones who do most of their patrolling from behind their desks, not the ones who are actually out and about. Be careful about who you talk to in unfamiliar territory. All it takes is one phone call, a visit from the police, a couple of unsafe storage charges - and she's all gone! We can still enjoy our guns, though, despite the troubles.
kjohn
 
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