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Discussion Starter #1
Forming .33 WCF from .45-70. Will I get longer cases or thicker necks when sizing down to .33? How thick should they mike? I have a tubing micrometer but want some benchmark to go from. Usually when necking up I lose length and going smaller they elongate to one degree or another. The thickness is my burning question at the moment. Thanks. Bandito :)
 

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If you have a drawing of the cartridge, like the ones in loading manuals, you should be able to figure it out pretty easily. Just take the diameter at the case mouth, subtract the bullet diameter and divide the result by two and you should have your neck thickness for that cartridge. It has been my experience when sizing down that you will gain some thickness in the case neck. Whether or not case neck turning or inside reaming is required depends on how much thickness you gain and the chamber of the rifle in which it is to be fired. In my Handloaders Manual of Cartridge Conversions, it show the neck diameter as .366

The case forming advice says you need a form die or intermediate die like a 40/65 before full length sizing in the .33 WCF die. It also advises to anneal the cases. It does not advise that neck thickness will be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
KciH

Thanks for the data. Are you by chance familiar with the Mike Venturino book"Shooting Lever Guns of the Old West"? I made an inquiry in the book section but no bites. Would like some feedback before buying it. If not, have you used his book on buffalo rifles or sixguns? Thanks again for the insight. "dito :cool:
 

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I've only read Mike's work in periodicals. It's just another bunch of books to put on my "To read" list. I've always found his work interesting, so maybe I'll pick them up.

Good luck with your case forming project, it doesn't sound too bad. I like to use Imperial Sizing Wax when doing trickier case forming, works well. I'm sure you know about annealing, but I would only do the portion of the case down to the back of the shoulder.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Annealing

I avoid annealing like the plague. I am a virgin. I have lost cases sometimes but have usually found a way to eliminate the problem for the most part. I even lost one 45-70 case on the first sizing before loading some bulk brass. It was one in fifty. Just went too fast! Ususally the Imperial Wax will solve the problem if things get tough. Another thanks kciH! 'dito;)
 

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Bandito,
basic annealing for the purpose of case forming is a piece of cake and it doesn't take too long or require any special tools. Just put your brass in a cake pan that has a water level that corresponds with the soon-to-be shoulder area of your future 33 Winchester cases. Line em up in rows. Take a propane torch and play it over the cases individually until you get a faint orange glow, then tip it over into the water and go on to the next one. It's easier than it sounds and it doesn't sound too tough.
 

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Just in case, will try to save you some trouble. Use straight smooth brass 45/70 cases...avoid plated cases and any with a groove.caneleur (damn...spell like old folks have sex...slow and sloppy), Cases will thicken when necked down, but probably not too much. One simple test is to form one case, seat a bullet, coat the neck area with Marks-a-lot, chamber it, and look for any hard rub marks...better is to fire form one case and then check for bullet fit in that formed but unsized case.
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Will tell an old story. Back wehn there were not 7.62X25 (.30 Mauser) cases for sale, made them from .222 cases. Reamed the neck and all was well with the Tok. I was shooting.

Bought a CZ and decided to use some of the old loads for the tok. At about the fifth round, noticed the ejected empty looked just like a 9mm case.

That CZ had a much tighter chamber, and even though i had reamed those case necks to be right for the Tok, it was too thick for the CZ...it was firing the bullet AND THE CASE NECK out of the bore with each shot.

Pressure must have been a tad high, but nothing came loose, and I kicked myself for breaking a golden rule: each chamber is a law unto itself.
 

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Dito,
As I stated earlier, and has been backed up by Ribbonstone, YOUR chamber will dictate whether case neck turning or inside reaming is needed. If it comes down to the two options, I'd turn the case necks.
 

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Necks will be both longer and thicker. Trim to length, then load one dummy round. Compare outside neck dimension w/bullet to the (unsized) outside neck diameter of a factory case that was shot in your gun, to see if resized cases will have necks that are too thick. Report numbers here if this doesn't make sense, we will help you sort it out.

Start with new brass, get some good case lube, run them into your bullet seating die first, then final size in the full-length sizer die. If you have trouble, run them part-way into the bullet seating die, then the rest of the way in a second pass.
 
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