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Recently I acquired a new (to me) Win mod. 70 in 270 Win. with the intention of trying it with cast lead bullets and using the original iron sights rather than a scope. I also acquired on older Lyman 119 gr Loverin style mold and more recently, the Lee 135 gr. mold. So far I am very pleased with the results. The Lyman bullets have been giving nice 2.5" groups at 100 yards. The Lee bullets seem to shoot a little better in the first test at 40 yards yesterday. After trying several powders in the last couple months, I settled on 5744 and RE-7 as my primary powders with the 5744 being slightly better. This old rifle's (manufactured in 1972) barrel seems to like velocities around 1900 fps. Every rifle barrel seems to have its own personality with cast lead, of course. I did add a Williams low profile peep sight (WGRS) which fit beautifully into the rear scope mount holes which is great for older eyes like mine. My lube is Lee Alox for simplicity and my own lead alloy is not that hard (60% pure and 40% chilled hard birdshot).
 

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This might seem ignorant/arrogant of me...but being a faithful .270 owner, why shoot cast lead and handicap the cartridge that’s meant to push 3,000 FPS? Again I apologize if I come off as ignorant...just curious is all..

Thanks,
Jake
 

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This might seem ignorant/arrogant of me...but being a faithful .270 owner, why shoot cast lead and handicap the cartridge that’s meant to push 3,000 FPS? Again I apologize if I come off as ignorant...just curious is all..

Thanks,
Jake
I'll jump in here. Casting and shooting cast bullets in virtually any caliber rifle is a great way to expand one's knowledge and enjoyment of the shooting sport, and extending the capabilities and usefulness of a cartridge beyond and regardless of it's original intended purpose or 'fit' as one may deem. Beyond that, casting bullets is a very fulfilling and often times challenging and frustrating hobby that can have the additional reward of saving money while shooting more. The ability to select a desired velocity expands the rifle's usefulness from big game (in this case) to varmint and even small game hunting, he may even shoot squirrels with his 270. Paper punching can challenge one to make better bullets, experiment with alloys and different powder and lube combinations. Reduced recoil and noise can lengthen and make shooting sessions more enjoyable, and less noise can make for happier neighbors and bystanders. There are many benefits to extending your enjoyment of your firearms by shooting cast bullets, and if you don't choose to get involved in the casting side of the sport, there are many commercial sources for excellent cast bullets. Don't sell cast bullet shooting short, i.e. a .458 Win. Mag. does not have to stay in the closet until an elephant walks by.
 

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Recently I acquired a new (to me) Win mod. 70 in 270 Win. with the intention of trying it with cast lead bullets and using the original iron sights rather than a scope. I also acquired on older Lyman 119 gr Loverin style mold and more recently, the Lee 135 gr. mold. So far I am very pleased with the results. The Lyman bullets have been giving nice 2.5" groups at 100 yards. The Lee bullets seem to shoot a little better in the first test at 40 yards yesterday. After trying several powders in the last couple months, I settled on 5744 and RE-7 as my primary powders with the 5744 being slightly better. This old rifle's (manufactured in 1972) barrel seems to like velocities around 1900 fps. Every rifle barrel seems to have its own personality with cast lead, of course. I did add a Williams low profile peep sight (WGRS) which fit beautifully into the rear scope mount holes which is great for older eyes like mine. My lube is Lee Alox for simplicity and my own lead alloy is not that hard (60% pure and 40% chilled hard birdshot).
I've also have shot cast gas-checked bullets in my .270, and even used it for hunting Squirrels a few time, when I lived in Southern Indiana. While it was slightly over-gunned for Squirrel sized game it was accurate. However, my most accurate caliber and rifle was my Winchester Model 43 bolt action in .25-20 Winchester. I cast bullets from a NEI brand mold, 75 grain sized to .257" gas-checked bullets, using pure lead. Used this for hunting those big Indiana Fox Squirrels almost every season, and my load of: 4.5 Grains of Unique was a very accurate load and non-destructive on Squirrels. Velocity was kept at 1,400 FPS.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
When I started casting bullets for modern rifles, I had already been casting for fishing gear as well as my muzzleloaders for well over 35 years. It immediately became an absorbing and challenging hobby after reloading jacketed became boring. Casting bullets adds at least five new variables to consider in reloading - alloy, lube, casting technique, bullet shape, barrel personality, brass shape, and more considerations. Sometimes a particular rifle barrel (not necessarily caliber) takes to CB's like a duck to water in days (e.g. the 270 and one of my 308's et. al.) while another that should theoretically love cast, hates CB's (my old and much beloved 6mm Rem comes to mind). There are a couple calibers I have that should not like cast that caught me completely by surprise when they loved CB's - my 338WM, and my 250 Sav which now may be my most accurate for competitions. I shoot more now than I ever did before and it is affordable, especially my 338WM and 444 Marlin.
As for hunting with CB's, I learned decades ago after switching to muzzleloading for deer and elk ( as required in my state to choose a weapon every year), that, unless you do a lot of long range shooting, at ranges under 150 yards, high velocity is over rated. You just have to create the right alloy for better terminal performance with the benefit of often being able to eat "right up to the hole".
If you are a tinkerer and like to fix things that "ain't broke", making your own CB's will become a benign addiction. Learning not to "mess with success" is really hard.
 

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I have always thought of cast bullets for larger diameter bores and/or slower velocity cartridges. I know about gas-checked options, but fear of leading has always steered me away from cast bullets in rounds that shoot smaller diameter bullets really fast.

I really like the economy of shooting cast from certain rounds, like the 44/40 and a wildcat I work with, the 358GNR.
 

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I have a Model 70 in .270 win. I agree with nigonjac. Why? Mine shoots cloverleafs with manufacturers ammo (Remington Corelokt 130gr) and my hand load, Barnes TSX 140gr.
 

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It's more "can I make this work " than it is "necessity ". Making ammunition is as enjoyable for some as is shooting. Cast is just another permutation that takes some thought and care.
 

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I don't see getting a 270 and loading cast bullet's in it. That 270 on a 308 case would be different. I cast for just one rifle, 308 Win. Started with the 30-06 but seem's to me I didn't need to waste the potentiate of the 30-06 with cast bullet's. Think of a 257 cal with cast bullet's. 25-06 would give up a lot but 250-3000 would about match if bot match the 25-06 with the same bullet's and less MTY case space, if that matter's. If you had a 220 Swift and a 22 hornet, which one would you consider for cast bullet's!
 

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It can be interesting.

I have shot some cast bullets out of the .338 Win Mag, that worked pretty well, at some velocities you might have a difficult time believing. Practical? Maybe not, but did it anyway.

The .30-30, and .35 Rem to a lesser extent, take to cast bullets very well. But that doesn't mean you can't use them at rifle velocities, in other cartridges. If you want to start out on that journey.... by all means, do so. It is an interesting path.
 

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I bought bullet molds for several calibers including .270, 30-06,.243 and .224, not for the fun of it but just for a back-up plan!
With the political climate we face today one never knows what tomorrow will bring!, I have near 1000 lbs of lead and many lbs of wheel weights, thousands of primers and a bunch of powder; I would rather have a .223 with the power of a .22 magnum than a hand full of rocks to defend myself! My .223's are both bolt guns!
 

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The caliber/cartridge is beside the point to me: Like the OP seems to be suggesting, for me it's more about the challenge and perhaps the self-reliance involved in being able to very literally MAKE bullets out of raw materials and then turn that into usable, customizable fodder for any given firearm. There are MANY worse expenditures of time than learning how to cast bullets for any gun you own.

I"ve shot lead through most of the rifles I own. Like most, I find the most practical benefits in calibers 30 and above. I've put tens of thousands of rounds through 30-30, 30-06, 35 Whelen, and mostly, 45-70. The ability to tune those loads while keeping recoil and report down keeps me interested. Sometimes is more about the art and craft than the quantifiable practical aspects. JMO.
 

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This might seem ignorant/arrogant of me...but being a faithful .270 owner, why shoot cast lead and handicap the cartridge that’s meant to push 3,000 FPS? Again I apologize if I come off as ignorant...just curious is all..

Thanks,
Jake
There are times when folks like to shoot their 270 at targets, or small game.
Practice shooting is much easier at 20 cents a shot than at a $1 a shot.
Also cast bullets gives the 270 a new dimension, a slower bullet that can take small game and varmints at close range in more populated areas.

One thing I have noticed about 270 shooters is they are the least likely to pick up their brass at the range, and there are very limited numbers of 270 cast bullet molds available -

I have several motorcycles that are capable of 130 miles per hour. They are more fun riding in the twisty, windy roads at 40 mph than on a straight road at 130 MPH.

I started to shoot cast bullets for economic reasons. That was the first lie I told myself. Now i shoot them because they make my rifles a whole lot more versatile .

I have hunted with a 30/06 for years. A friend gave me a 270 a few years back. They are so close to being the same cartridge that I can't tell the difference when the deer drops.

There is nothing wrong with getting the most out of your 270, whether it be with cast bullets for target and small game hunting.
 
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