Shooters Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've had my CED Millennium 2 out twice. It works very well, if it is set up perfectly. It is a real pain to align perfectly and it seems I have to shoot very low (scary low) over the sensors to prevent error readings. I'm using the infrared kit. Does anyone have advice? Do you have this same problem?
Thanks
Doug in Alaska
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
I have the original Millenium and have never had a problem at all. I've used the IR screens to clock a lot of airgun pellets in my basement, all without a hitch. Those are about as small and hard to read as a projectile gets, except for BB's.

One difference between the MI and MII is that the newer version has self-adjusting sky screen sensitivity that is supposed to make it more immune to variations in light conditions. Sounds like it may be overcompensating? You might call the factory and describe the issue? One nice thing is each screen and the computer are all separately replaceable, so you shouldn't have to send anything large to them.

Re alignment: I've always found chronographs a bit of a nuisance to line up. I used to go to either side trying alternately to see the bench and the target through the center, but it was always off a little. I finally hit on a solution: I set a rifle up on the bags so it sits aimed at the target. I put a laser bore sighter into it. I then trudge out to the chronograph and find the beam with the palm of my hand. Next I move the tripod and crank it up and down until my palm finds the laser at the center of each screen. I find it helps to use a rubber band to hold one of those little circular spirit levels on the beam between the screens. That takes care of tilt and one axis of alignment if you are on a level range. This method compensates for how high the sight line is above the bore line. You will be sighting three quarters to an inch above the laser spot.

Per another thread, don't forget to remove the laser before you start shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks much for the suggestions. The laser is a great idea. I don't have a laser bore sighter; any suggestions on which one to get? I really like this idea! I'll also give the manufacturer a call on Monday.
Thanks again.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
For this purpose the cheapest of the ones that go in the bore are fine. They may err by a few inches at 100 yards, but at 15 feet its nothing. I like the cartridge case shaped ones from the standpoint of safety because they make it impossible to load and shoot a round with the laser sighter still in the gun (a stunt that can and has burst barrels). But because you need different arbors for each chambering, they are not the least costly. So, putting a range safety flag in the chamber or some other reminder to remove the muzzle type sighters before firing is a good idea. Just develop the habit of putting the flag in before the sighter goes in and taking it out after the sighter is removed. You can even write "check the muzzle for a sighter" right on the flag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks much for the help, I'll give it a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Ok, for anyone interested, here's an update. Yesterday, I contacted CED about my problems with the M2 chronograph and quite frankly, the customer support has been phenomenal. I spoke with a very nice lady (Supaporn). She asked lots of questions, offered advice and told me to expect an email message within the next few hours. When I got home from work, the email had arrived with several attached files and a drawing.

Early this morning I received another email message from Charles, explaining that he is currently traveling internationally and apologizing for the delayed response. He also offered tips but asked several question regarding shooting conditions, set-up, temperatures, speeds, etc. I answered his questions and he responded within an hour. He thinks the distance I'm setting the sensors from the muzzle is to close. I won't get a chance to give his suggestions a try until April 16 but he asked I contact him immediately following my next range session.

I guess I'm not familiar with kind of tech support. This is great and expect with this kind of support the problem will be sorted out shortly. I highly recommend this company when you begin shopping for your next chronograph. Amazing!!!!!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
Ah! Yet another symptom to attribute to muzzle blast complications! Good to know. I always recommend 15 feet, same as the magazine writers and manufacturers use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Actually, my manual says to place sensors between 7' and 10' from the muzzle. However, I think this is going to solve the problem. I still can't understand why muzzle blast from the .22-250AI is excessive. When I start chronographing the 7RUM, I'll be really concerned. BTW, thanks for recommending the laser bore sighter, it's on the way. Thanks much for the tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
I have a CED with infrared lights and it works very well. The only time I have trouble iwth it is when the lights are not electrified. Make sure to check that both green lights are on when you use it. Sometimes you have to fool around with the plugs to get a constant connection.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
I'd forgotten the spacing recommendation? Since I already owned an Oehler 35P, which I've always used at 15 yards, I got my CED as the down-range chronograph for determining ballistic coefficients with rounds that went through both. Had to verify they track each other well, and they do. The nice big display on the CED is easy to read through a spotting scope. That's how I came to be interested in finding a better alignment system than just eyeballing.

Anyway, 7' will do for most small caliber pistols and rimfire guns. 10' is usually considered a minimum for rifles, but I like to copy the magazines and manufacturers use of 15" (to the midpoint between the screens) just to get comparable data.
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
24,127 Posts
Yup - always set the Pact PC2 up 15' from the muzzle to eliminate muzzle blast and those on adjacent benches with muzzle breaks. Be surprised how much a Loudenboomer with a brake next to you will affect the readings.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
Since this thread, I also ran into a post on another forum in which the fellow had a .338 Mag that necessitated the screens being at 18' to prevent false triggering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
How was this done when the folding, mounting arm dictates a 24" spacing between the sensors?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
You got me. I fixed the typo. I meant the center point between screens is at 18 feet from the muzzle, not inches between screens.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top