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QUOTE by RoBoTech
Bought a SW Model 10 with a 4" heavy barrel. It was a Birmingham
Police gun and had been carried but not shot very much.
I paid 85,00 from a Gun Store in Huntsville. They had 50-60 of them.
Went through about 20 to find the solid lockup and timing I wanted.
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Used revolvers scare me as I dont know enough to be able to find
a good one and fear I might get one that is worn and possibly not safe.
The above statement inplies that the guy found 19 pistols that had enough
wrong with them that he didnt want to buy them. And this is concerning
one of the Stalwart brands of the industry.

Can someone please comment on the referenced "lockup" and
"timing" mentioned above.

Thanks
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Man you got a good deal. Police trade ins are usually some of the best used revolvers on the market. A couple of quick things to check for is solid lock up and for any slack in the cylinder. The cylinder should not be able to be rotated any by hand when the gun is cocked and the cylinder should not move front to back on the cylinder pin. Most minor problems with revolvers can be corrected easily.
 

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When I check a used revolver I do the following (after making sure it is empty) and assuming it is a 6-shot weapon:

1. Open and close the cylinder 6 times, rotating the cylinder 1/6 turn before each time. This shows that the yoke and ejector rod are in line at least enough to avoid interfering with cylinder opening.

2. Cock the hammer very slowly with very light pressure from left thumb against the cylinder. Watch to see if the cylinder bolt locks into position at full cock on each chamber. This shows whether the revolver is "in time" and "carrys up" properly.

3. Repeat the above step double action.

4. With cylinder open, rotate it 1/6 turn and press ejector rod fully. Do this 6 times. This shows whether the ejector, yoke barrel and center pin are straight.

5. With hammer cocked, check for fore-and-aft or side-to-side play in the cylinder. Do this for each chamber. A little movement can be OK but if it is really noticeable it is a red flag. This checks for cylinder end shake. The cylinder should NOT contact the breech end of the barrel.

6. With hammer uncocked, try to move cylinder fore and aft, while watching the joint beyween the crane and the frame to see if the crane moves fore and aft. This checks for yoke endshake. Sometimes it is caused by swapping screws on the sideplate of a S&W (the screw that holds the yoke is a fitted screw and needs to go back in the same hole every time).

6. With hammer cocked, press on back of hammer with about 10-15 pounds of thumb pressure. The hammer should not fall. This ensures the sear is not broken.

7. Dry fire 6 times double action and 6 times single action to check trigger pull.

8. Take a good look at the revolver for such things as loose sights, missing or buggered screws, obvious excessive wear, rust, or a crooked barrel (I have seen a few).

If you find something wrong, it may not be the end of the world. For example, both yoke and cylinder endshake on a S&W can be repaired in about 10 minutes with no need for parts by somebody who knows what to do. Most other repairs are pretty simple and S&W or Ruger will usually fix them for free.

Sometimes I have identified a problem that would cost $20.00 to repair and have gotten more than that knocked off the price of the gun. As long as the frame, yoke and barrel are OK, everything else can be fixed, so if you really want the gun and you have checked it thoroughly, get the best deal you can and write the check.
 

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It doesn't really matter, if you buy a Ruger or S&W, they will repair it and bring it back to factory specs for free. I don't know about other brands taking that good of care to their customers.
 

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One thing I would like to add is do NOT dry fire a rimfire revolver! Depending on model, you run the risk of breaking the firing pin and/or damaging the edge of the cylinders.
 

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When I dry fire a rimfire while inspecting a revolver, I always catch the hammer with my left thumb to cushion the fall and protect the firing pin and chamber edge.
 

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Thats also not an issue with Ruger's, you can dry fire them all you want, you'll never hurt one.
 

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well ruger has a good name.. but my 60 leaves nothing to fix or make better..imo..
just learn your gun..i just know it feels right an shoots right..never imagined i could hit much with a snubby ..but it was as easy as falling off a log,soon as i picked that gun up.. easiest gun to get to know ,i ever owned,, an thats whats got to happen for me to call a gun my carry shootin iron.. plus its a dang good black jack, face buster,, if i think i can get away with not shootin them.... jmo slim..
 
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