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Discussion Starter #1
A few weeks ago i was looking to buy a 6 hole turret press as i sold the old 4 hole lee as i was never really satisfied with the results of loading cast rifle cartridges on it. I ended up buying a pro 1000 and so far it has proven a far better press for handgun ammo with much tighter tolerances but i still wanted something for cast rifle since i need four dies for some loads and so i just ordered the classic cast four hole turret press yesterday just for this purpose. Who uses this press for rifle loads? does it align the cases and seat the bullets straight?
 

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IF a press can put a case into a die, it's done about all it can do to make straight ammo. After that, it's up to the brass and the dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IF a press can put a case into a die, it's done about all it can do to make straight ammo. After that, it's up to the brass and the dies.
Well from my experience i would have to disagree as the case needs to enter the dies as straight as possible to size a case properly including inside the neck. And then there is the issue of the bullets not being seated straight and further messing up the case necks. This is why most people prefer to load precision rifle rounds on single stage presses. I realize that no progressive press or turret press can match the precision of a single stage but am hoping the classic will have as good as the alignment on my pro since as far as the eyes can tell is perfect in all three stations.
 

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I have the Lee's classic cast turret for about a year now. I reload .45-70 goverment with no problems, I am very happy with it and I like the cast iron base. Seems to be very solid for me. You should know that I remove the indexing rod and tun the turret by hand, to each station. I really like this option. Basically becomes a single stage, with out have to change out the dies for each stage. I batch load my cases, so this is no problem.

Yet, when I am loading .45 long colt and .45 acp, I reinstall index rod and then use it as a semi-progressive. I like the ability to have the option.

I am not in competition, I shoot for enjoyments and hunting. So, I do not need the sub/sub moa out of my loads.

I take my time and I do not rush during reloading. Use this time as my down time to relax contemplate the universe, a good horse, or the gal that out shot me at the range.

No complaints on my end. Treat the Classic Cast Turret with respect and you should have good relationship with her.

Lonerider
 

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"Well from my experience i would have to disagree as the case needs to enter the dies as straight as possible to size a case properly including inside the neck."

Scott, I don't think anyone would disagree with that and I certainly didn't suggest otherwise.

But, since you disagree, I have a question: Obviously a round, tapered object (a case) WILL self center in a round, tapered hole (a die) UNLESS it's interfered with, and any press can do that unless its tighly bored and grips the case so hard they cannot align, what do you expect a press to accomplish other than provide the force to insert and withdraw the case? (And I can assure you that when the case goes into a die the inside of the neck will be there, no additional attention or alignment is required!)


"This is why most people prefer to load precision rifle rounds on single stage presses."

Most people prefer to load precision rifle rounds on a single stage to get away from excessive press springing under pressure that is common with turret presses. ??


Actually, if you credit them with some knowledge of handloading, note the bench rest crowd rarely use threaded presses at all. They generally use hand dies and arbor presses, specifically to avoid any possible press interference in mating the dies and cases. Meaning, the arbor presses they use do nothing but press cases into dies and back out. And they do make some precision ammo, do they not?

We common reloaders do far more agonizing about the "right press" to make precise ammo than it justifies; it's the dies that do the job. Fact is, no press has much impact on the precision of the finished product unless it actually forces things OUT of alignment! And, with some 45 years of handloading experience, I have never seen that occur from any press at all.
 

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I have to agree with Ranger. THe case will move incrementally in the shellholder and center itself within the die. This happens even with a single stage, though probably we don;t notice it. Lee makes good stuff, so I think you did well ordering the Classic Turret.

I don;t own a turret, but my next press will almost certainly be the Classic Cast Turret. And....there is no doubt I'll use it like Lonerider does his..... reloading in batched-stages and indexng manually by hand.
 

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The case will center itself in the die, if given the opportunity. If the operator uses one hard, continuous motion, the friction between cartridge, shell holder, and ram will tend to keep the case from centering in the die. If the operator pauses at a few intervals along the way, the pressure on the shell holder is reduced, allowing the cartridge to float and re-align. Most conventional press rams take out slack in opposite directions when the toggle inverts (when the linkage pivots and ram pivots pass horizontal), so simply aligning the case with the die at the beginning of the stroke is not sufficient. The old adage to pause and rotate the cartridge during the middle of seating the bullet has as much to do with the pause to release pressure and allow realignment as it does with rotating the cartridge.

The Forster Co-Ax press design is unique in that it takes out ram slack in one direction for the duration of the stroke, and it includes features for both the cartridge and the die to float into alignment with each other.

Andy
 

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Hold it Hombres. I think you fellas are getting a little off base here with the question that Scott has asked. I believe he's asking for opinions on the Lee Classic 4 hole press. :rolleyes:
I've had a RCBS single stage press for awhile. It was good for loading rifle but slow when loading handgun loads. I graduated to a Lee 3 hole turret press (that's all they had 30 years ago) and loved it. It has the speed I need to accurately load my handgun bullets and with a slight alteration by removing the index rod, becomes a single stage press to use when loading my rifle bullets. I ended up giving that Lee press to my brother cause he was borrowing it all the time. I bought the Lee 4-hole Turret Press and have been pretty happy with it. I now use a crimping die on all my rifle and handgun loads which means that I can use the turret once again from bullet seating and progress to the crimping stage. Done! All in all for me tha Lee Classic Turret Press is definitely a winner both in performance and price.
Good luck and be safe.
 

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I use mine to load 45-70 and 223. I cut down a funnel and affixed it to the turret so I can use the Lee Dipper Cups to charge a case.

 

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Discussion Starter #10
This thing came in this evening...not the best casting i have seen and actually should be considered a second! Also this is the roughest press i have used but it should smooth out with a little use. It seems that all holes in the turret line up as good as it gets with a multi station press of any type so i am overlooking the casting and roughness of the press.
 

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I been using a RCBS Rock Chucker for 40 years give or take and it served me well for most of my needs. Then came the competition shooting with a pistol and that change the outlook on getting ammo produced in large quanities.......thus my partnership in the "Green Machine" for a few years.

Now recentley I found the need to make more ammo in large numbers for the wife and I, so Hornady answered the call with their Progressive Lock & Load press. It still requires pulling that handle but just not as much as the single stage. I can load up a batch ( 400 to 500 ) of pistol or .308 rifle ammo and not work up a sweat doing so. It has the auto-case feeder, along with a Kiss auto-bullet feeder.

I figured the cost up the other day, and I have close to $1,600 bucks tired up in the whole sha-bang. Sounds like a lot of cash for a reloading outfit but this gets it done fast and store bought ammo is not getting any cheaper. My wife only shoots twice a week nowdays and that is in a .40 cal. She fires off a 100 rds a session. So that is 4 boxes of ammo per week at $15 dollars a box for Blazer ammo. So $60 dollars a week times 40 weeks a year, adds up to $2,400 dollars a year if my math is correct. I pay for that Hornady unit in around 7 months of her cost of shooting store bought ammo.
 

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Most of the guys I shot with use Dillion presses....but I came to the conclusion that I didn't need to load that fast...in fact I simply could not afford that volume. I initially bought a Lee progressive and never could get it set up...so I sent in back and traded for a Lee Class Turret press. I love this rig....lots of options.....I have found that using Lee dies works better than converting RCBS and Lyman dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Most of the guys I shot with use Dillion presses....but I came to the conclusion that I didn't need to load that fast...in fact I simply could not afford that volume. I initially bought a Lee progressive and never could get it set up...so I sent in back and traded for a Lee Class Turret press. I love this rig....lots of options.....I have found that using Lee dies works better than converting RCBS and Lyman dies.
I would love to try the Dillon 550b out but don't know anyone that has one i can access and probably it's for the better since i really cant afford one since caliber conversions are a bit expensive but i do love the looks of that press. I bought a pro 1000 for pistol ammo and after reading the instructions and following them it works great and as long as the trough is kept full and clean there are no problems with priming or indexing as i quickly discovered letting that area get dirty will not only cause priming problems but indexing problems as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well folks you are correct! I have had a chance to use this one and there is not one tiny bit of difference i can tell whether loaded on this one or my single stage classic (groups are the same). I was hoping for a slick press though. My cc o frame is as slick as glass and this one is just starting to smooth out a little... I just hope that when it does finally smooth out that it doesn't cause any alignment problems as you can feel a drag on the first few inches of ram stroke in either direction. The part about the casting that i complained about is where they removed the flashing they took too much off one side. Lee has tripled their work force since the change in Washington and it seems the folks in QC are not doing such a great job! As long as i have no problems with it, i don't think the o frame will see any more loading! it will be used for decapping and bullet sizing.
 
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