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Discussion Starter #1
I recently read an old article that highly reccomended cleaning your loaded cartridges before firing. The theory was that the excess lube on the nose of the bullet did bad things to your gun.
Since I have a new tumbler and was desperate to find something else to clean, I threw a half a dozen lead bullet loaded 41 mag rounds into the walnut media and turned it on. Three hours later I pulled out 6 highly polished cases with soft brown furry noses. A little solvent and I was back in business.
Does anyone clean the lube off of the exposed portion of their bullets?
 

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Hi, Jim:
The thought of firing walnut media down the barrel gives me the heebie-jeebies. I only use that stuff for extremely grungy cases. The dust sticks to the inside of the cases too, and it takes the airhose to get it out. It's corncob the rest of the time.

I wipe off the noses as I transfer the cartridges from the loading block to the cartridge box. You can do it while watching TV or checking the web. Beats wiping them at the range if you drop them in the dirt. Some bullets have exposed lube grooves, like the Lyman 311664, so I doubt if it's bad for the gun if the bullet is clean.

Bye
Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can't believe you would sit there and give me something else to worry about.
I had never thought that the walnut would be abrasive enough to damage the barrel.
 

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Gee, I'd be more concerned that the tumbling causes the powder grains to lose their coatings or break up making the powder burn faster and raise pressures. ;)
 

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I have no data to base this on other then a Scientific Wild *** Guess.
I'd bet that the amount of abrasive going down the barrel with any of your walnut media would have less effect then the glass in the priming compound.
Jim
 

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If you just have to clean loaded ammo, then it's probably better not to trade one contaimation for another. When the urge strikes me, I'll clean them a simple way.
1. Save the odd-sock when one wears out (or use that one you found alone in the wash and have never found the match).
2. Put in ammo (how much ammo depends on the size of your feet).
3. A squirt of lighter fluid to the oustside of the sock (it will soak through)...just a small damp area in the center of the sock.
4. Grab the oepn end and close it...grab the toe end with the other hand...roll the rounds back and forth a few times.
5. Dump ehtme out to dry, but PLACE THE SOCK OUTSIDE...lay it on a fench or something that lest air circulate ...ball it up and you have a decent chance to re-discover spontaneous combustion.
 

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I have read lots of no-no's about tumbling loaded ammo; besides those Sionaphrys mentioned (what does that name mean, anyway?), there is apparently a risk of detonation due to static electricity. I don't know, never tried it. I DID try tumbling some old Hornady bullets because they had tarnished - the lead wore off the tips, and I had some very interesting "proptected point" bullets. They shot OK, though...

IDShooter
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Jack, I've done essentialy what you say with press solvent and a shop towel. I can do that while I running a job.
BUT, back to the question. Is cleaning the excess lube necessary or desirable?
 

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Unless I'm shooting a cast bullet with lube grooves that are exposed when the round is loaded and I feel the load requires that much lube, I clean off the excess lube by rubbing it off with a cotton cloth. I don't think the lube will hurt anything but it will pick up grit and carry it into the bore. Exposed lube may also come off in the chamber or on the loading ramp, making a mess.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
sion ap rhys

Off the subject a bit.
One of my ancestors name was Rhyss. In North Carolina in the 1700s. Changed their name to Rice shortly after a Welsh pirate named Rhyss was caught and hung along the Alantic Coast. Family trees are interesting.
 

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Jim,
if you keep your loaded rounds in plastic boxes, or some other form of protection from dust and grit, you shouldn't need to worry about anything bad happening to your weapon.

If you've just gotta polish some brass, go shooting and polish your fired brass. :) Much more entertaining.

As Jack stated, the Walnut media is intended for cleaning really grungy brass..like range brass. The corn cob, which is much more economical, will put a better than factory shine on the brass you use regularly. I usually throw in a capful of purpose-made, non ammonia, cleaner to speed the process. It makes your media last longer because you don't have to polish as long.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
kciH

I ran over 200 rnds last weekend so I could have something to polish.

Well, maybe it was legimate practice too.

It's a lot more fun since I had the local machine shop cut some 8" and 5" circles from 3/8" steel plate. They welded 2 chain links on the back so that the plate hangs from a cable with the top of the plate slightly toward me. Any hits are deflected down into a hillside hole for safety sake. "Clang" is very satisfying
 
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