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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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For a lot of years I've been able to use many different solutions for successfully cleaning my blued guns. But now that I'm purchasing stainless steel revolvers, I'm not satisfied with my process for cleaning the throat end of the cylinders, that is, completely remove all of the black rings.  The only thing I've found that allows me to completely remove the black ring is the "Lead Remover" yellow cloth. But while that does do the job, it's clumsy and laborious.  Would appreciate any information on a product(s) that you would recommend to address this particular problem.

Dan
 

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Stop using the Lead Removing cloth.  What you can't remove with solvent and a toothbrush doesn't need to be removed.  Anytime you use an abrasive on the cylinder throats, you are removing metal as well as the burn marks.  This will, in time, lead to causing the cylinder throats to become "out of round".  Just think of the burn marks as a "I shoot my gun a lot" badge.

I was told this by the head gunsmith at Freedom Arms and this was discussed in the IHMSA paper a couple of years ago, so it's not just my opinion.
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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MS Hitman,

Really appreciate the heads-up and I'll certainly follow your information --- but it will require a personality change !!  On the other hand, when I stop to think about it, the only individual that would notice the untidiness is some one facing the wrong end, and I have it on good authority that bears and pigs aren't that particuar.

Again, thanks for the help.

Dan
 

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Dan...Buried somewhere back in the forum is a post where I discussed using Flitz for cleaning stainless. It is non-abrasive and will remove the fouling on the front of cylinders, out of barrels, etc. I use it as a bore prep also. It is very good for cleaning out both blue and stainless bores during breakin. Also great for muzzleloading barrels. Last weekend Little Hank and I went up to Lake City to the Fall Gun Show. I picked up a little Smith & Wesson Safety in 32 S&W that had laid in a drawer for 30 years. After the Flitz treatmnt the little nickle gun looked new.If the local stores don't have it, Flitz has a web site where you can buy it, Be sure to get the paste in a tube instead of the liquid in a bottle.
Best Regards, James
 

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James,

Flitz is a polishing compound, not a solvent based cleaner.  BY definition, that makes it an abrasive.  Although, it is a very mild one.  That is the reason it will shine metal like it does.  
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Discussion Starter #6
James,

I got to thinking about the problem and said to myself, "I'll bet James would recommend trying Fitz", so tried it this past Monday and it worked great. I found that it didn't take any pressure and was a lot easier to get in all the dirty places.  I meant to email you and tell you that you've made a real believer of me on the use of Fitz, but as usual, my little mind went elsewhere.  So, appreciate you taking the time for the suggestion and sure agree it does the job.

Dan
 

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I repeat again....As per the Flitz people, "Contains no Ammonia or Abrasives"(and on their label)...I suppoes you will have to argue with Flitz, not me....JCG
 

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James,

My tube of Flitz says metal polish and fiberglass cleaner.  I do not wish to argue with you or Flitz, but I will repeat myself, if a cleaner is not a solvent, it is an abrasive.  Same goes for the polishing compounds used to remove scratches from car finishes.  

You simply can not polish metal without removing a portion of the metal to make the surface smoother.  No arguements, my friend, just facts.
 

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Instead of getting all wrapped up on this question.....I have contacted the people at Flitz. I think it best to let them say if Flitz is abrasive (therefore would remove metal) or non-abrasive. I was told it was a chemical makeup in a non-abrasive paste that removed all tarnish, etc. down to the surface of the metal. In the meanwhile, I suggest the members go to Flitz.com and satisfy themselves.....JCG
 

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Good for you James.  

Did you go over to the MSDS sheet to see that it is made up of 25% SOLID POLISHING POWDER?  I'm not one to carry on long arguements with the Florida boys, but this is getting to be  like what is the definition of "is".  I do not know what there grit standard is not to be called an abrasive, however, even the 5F polishing powder Brownells sells for stock polishing still removes scratches. That can't be done without removing material from around the blemish.

Anyway. all this to say, they are your guns; clean them however you wish.
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Discussion Starter #11
Prior to trying the Flitz I had on hand last Monday, I had scoured the Internet, looking for stainless steel cleaners and was surprised to find a large number of sites, each with their own “outstanding” product(s).  I found a particular site that really seems to know what they were talking about and appeared to be oriented towards the industrial side (rather than home users). Said to myself, “Self, this looks like righteous stuff!”  Ordered the industrial strength (aren’t they all?) stuff, pleased to pay only &#365.85 to ship it from New York to Ioway.  Got it today and was more than a little surprised to find the solution container had a familiar name on it …… FLITZ!

Not one sentence in the product description had used the word FLITZ, which of course I already have and can get locally.  Not only that, but I immediately remembered James had recommended “Be sure to get the paste in a tube instead of the liquid in a bottle.”

One of the disconcerting instructions on the bottle is “DO NOT LET DRY”. Now you and I know that I’m going to get some in the throat when I spread the liquid on the cylinder surface. And we both know it will dry before I can get it all wiped off, so end of story is I have an 8.5oz. container of Industrial Strength FLITZ Stainless Steel & Chrome Cleaner/Degreaser that I will give to my wife, nice, thoughtful fellow that I am.

And as for the “abrasive or not abrasive” discussion, if you see a Super Redhawk .44mag for sale in Marion, Iowa, then you’ll know it was abrasive.  If no sale sign, then either I successfully used the non-abrasive stuff or I have black rings on the cylinder --- stay tuned (kinda suspenseful, huh?)  

Dan
 

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I'm with you...I want Flitz to make an offical statement as to whether there is an abrasive in it or not. We customers have to go by what they advertise and if it is not correct I want to know so I can decide what to recommend. If it does have abrasive in it...then that's what it is no matter how fine.
 

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hmm,,, not to get agrumentive here Ms Hitman, but Mr Gates is correct. While the MSDS sheets do state a content in percentile of "abrasive powder", you must look at the overall composition of the solution. Then comes a long and chemically invovled reaction with such things as acidic bases and free radicals, leaving the determination of ,, the availability of either, "dissolved solids", "solids in suspension", or a coagulation of abrasive solids. Beyond all that you have to consider if the "abrasive" in solute is harder then the material being cleaned or is it not.
 Basically it boils down to ,,if all abrasive material were to corrode what it came in contact with,, the "hard" barley,sugar, and yeast, that is dissolved into water to make what we Canadians call beer <!--emo&;)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=';)'><!--endemo--> would actually hollow us out rather then give us a large belly shaped protrusion we claim bragging rights over.  
Also while "Flitz" is not measurably abrasive to ferrite based metals,ie stainless steel. It might be abrasive to a salt based metal, ie zinc or aluminium. 

 No hard feelings please. <!--emo&:)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':)'><!--endemo-->

(Edited by Snowman at 7:42 pm on Oct. 19, 2001)


(Edited by Snowman at 7:45 pm on Oct. 19, 2001)
 

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I found this topic interesting, as I have used the "lead remover cloth quite a bit to remove the burn rings on the front of my S&W 686's cylinder.  Could this have opened up the gap between cylinder and forcing cone?  I've probably run through only a handful of those cloths.

I'll have to try the Flitz.

Thanks,
Ray
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Discussion Starter #15
Ray,

My concerns on the abrasive situation is the potential, however small, for affecting the throats. A person is inclined to use the lead remover cloth in the same hand each time, thus would clean in the same direction each time. If any material is removed, it would tend to be the sharp edges of the throat, and would probably affect the front and far edges more than the top and bottom of the throat circle.  

I recently asked a top gun smith rather he recommended .4525" or .4530" for my .45 cylinder throats and he responded that while the .4525 was  probably more accurate, the more important dimension was consistency between all the throats.  Thus, my concern is any impact on the throats that would affect the consistency, however minor.

So, quite frankly, MS Hitman's original suggestion of cleaning with gun solvents and leaving the rings may be the safest process when cleaning that portion of the revolver.  

Dan
 

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I've used Flitz for years on guns and knives.

It will take material over an entended period of time, I have to agree with James. It is a mild abrasive, but abrasive nonetheless. Now by extended period of time, I'm talking polishing the same area several hundreds of times. Who will be cleaning them that often over a lifetime is anyones guess.

As to getting the front of the cylinder completely clean, whatever a bronze/brass brush will not removewith solvent should be left on the gun.

All my revolvers have the same markings, they show the gun is used by the owner. Once they get to a certain point, they get no worse if kept up with solvent and a cleaning brush.

I learned long ago to ignore it, it does not affect the function of the gun.

Brownie
 

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brownie0486 said:
I've used Flitz for years on guns and knives.
I've used Flitz for years too in both paste and liquid form. Paste for deep stains and liquid in the brass tumbler. IMHO, the amount of material that Flitz removes (if it removes any at all) is so miniscule that it would take years of intensive useage to be even measurable. This has been a great discussion but are we splitting the split hairs? :confused:
 
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