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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since my Dad never hunted, and we lived in a rural area were everyone hunted, and since there wasnt much in the way of technology in the 1970's to compete with my time, I bugged my closest neighbor to take me huntin with him.

I remember walking clumsily behind him on my first "woodchuck" hunt. I would stare at the ground, ya know, to keep from trippin' and he would look back at me, roll his eyes, and say...how many chucks are ya gonna see at your feet?...."look out in front of ya boy"

Well I had my share of misses at them chucks out at 100 to 200 yds, but it got me familiar with a rifle, and hunting safety, when deer season came along, I couldnt hardly sleep the night before.

It was my first big game hunt...I borrowed a rifle from my neighbor, and...just about everything else I reckon...I had on two pair of jeans...long underware, heavy winter coat, with a few sweat shirts on, and a plastic orange vest. I also had on a orange stocking cap, but worst of all...plastic snowmobile boots...if your old enough to know what i'm talking about, them plastic boots didnt let your feet breath a bit. and when you walked, your feet would sweat, and when you sat, your feet would go cold numb.

Well, it was dawn and about 22 degrees with snow on the ground, my Neighbor sat me at a tree, told me to sit still, he would be back to check on me in a few hours, and he'd be just down the trail about 100 yds or so. and keep alert, I mumbled OK...I was warm from walking the 1/2 mile or so to our stand, and it felt good to sit down for a spell.

Just about 20 mins later I heard the first rifle crack..... wow! I was excited...I kept a close eye on the area he had told me to watch, and then another rifle cracked...BaWoom...
Holy cow...them Deer must be closin in...then another..BaWoom....I was shivering and my teeth were chattering, [probably adrenaline] I seen a flicker of a deer tail... and another...pretty soon.. the whole woods filled with deer. I tried hard to spot antlers, but only seen Doe.

Things calmed down a bit, and an hour went by, I was hearing rifle cracks, but they were from a greater distance., and then it hit me, ...my feet were numb...cold..numb.. and now I had to concentrate on them cold feet...wow the sweat off my feet musta turned to ice, cause they were so cold I had the prickly stings all over them.

About two hours later I was in misery, even if a buck were to come by, I doubt I coulda shouldered the rifle, I was so cold I was losing feeling in my fingers, and the snot in my nose was froze up as well.

Around about that time my neighbor came to check on me, and asked if i had seen anything, I said "alot of Doe", but I was so cold even if i'd seen a buck I didnt think I coulda shot anyways. To which he said, get up and walk around ya knuckle head.!

Well the rest of the day went on like that, Sit still till ya froze out, then get up and walk a bit, I did see some more deer that day, but never got a chance at a buck, I remember going home that night, and my Mother asking if I had got anything, I answered "Cold Feet"
to which they all laughed and had fun with ..at my expense of course.

I have shot many deer since then, but I will never forget my first big game hunt, and why I have so many well insulated boots to this day!

C45
 

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That's a great story and how cool was it that your neighbor took you hunting like that?

I grew up hunting in California so when dad and I got an invitation to hunt in north-central Wisconsin back around '95, I made sure to buy some good hunting boots with Gore-tex, so I wouldn't have the same problem you did. When I landed at O'Hare airport, dad picked me up but one of my two bags didn't make the flight. Fortunately my tags were in the one suitcase that DID get there, but my new boots and gloves and a bunch of other gear didn't arrive until the hunt was over.

On the drive from Chicago to where we hunted, around Neillsville, we stopped off at a Walmart and I bought an inexpensive pair of boots, as well as a few other items I was missing. As my budget was very limited, I couldn't go all out and get the best equipment, and boy, did I pay for it! By 10:00 AM opening morning, my feet, hands and face were frozen numb, just like you said in your story. Our host had a pair of chopper type mittens and some thin Jersey gloves, which he suggested I wear in layers for the afternoon hunt. He said when I was just about ready to shoot, stick my right hand into my coat, under my left armpit and pull off the mitten, leaving the thin cotton glove to shoot with. I'll be darned if that didn't work out perfect and it's a system I still use, to this day. My feet still froze each time I went out, though. It was much better the following year when all of my stuff made it there, including my good boots! :)
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Being raised in the south, there was no such thing as wool clothing available when I was a kid. Everything was made from cotton the local crop. I can remember those mornings when it was in the teens that I sat on a deer stand freezing to death from damp cotton clothing. Several times I would just have to build a fire to get my feet warm, knowing that no deer would come my way. As I have gotten older, my tolerance for cold is very limited. Thank goodness for the new clothing that keeps you warm and dry. It allows me to sit on the deer stand like I used to without freezing. Plus, my new deer stand has sliding windows and propane heat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thankyou for letting me know i wasnt the only one out there frozen stiff. I live in the upper Central Pennsylvania region, were the chances of cold and snow were about 80%, But as the years passed it has seem to warm up in November, compared to the 1970's when I first started to hunt.

Cant say enough about warm boots, and good gear for hunting.,

C45
 

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Being raised in the south, there was no such thing as wool clothing available when I was a kid. Everything was made from cotton the local crop. I can remember those mornings when it was in the teens that I sat on a deer stand freezing to death from damp cotton clothing. Several times I would just have to build a fire to get my feet warm, knowing that no deer would come my way. As I have gotten older, my tolerance for cold is very limited. Thank goodness for the new clothing that keeps you warm and dry. It allows me to sit on the deer stand like I used to without freezing. Plus, my new deer stand has sliding windows and propane heat.
Heh... yep. A friend of ours always said that his toes felt like they were freezing and were gonna bust open. I remember one deer season when it snowed, I got real cold and pushed a lighter pine stump into the power line and lit the whole thing up. Fire must have been going 10' high and the snow was melted in at least a 10' circle around the fire but I got warm. Funny enough, over the course of the morning, I had four different hunters swing by to get warmed up too!
 

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Back in about 1991, My son Michael was about 16 and had been deer hunting (in Wisconsin) for only 4 years. After an opening weekend (Sunday) of not seeing any deer east of Osseo, WI area, we were headed home on I-94, when I spotted some deer headed west toward I-94. We were headed westbound and the deer were coming from our right side to the left, across our path of travel. Being a divided highway, and snowing like the dickens, our vision was limited to about 1/2 mile or so and we could see an oncoming semi-tractor and trailer. As we neared Foster, WI, the deer crossed in front of us and 3 of the 4 made across the eastbound traffic lanes (two) and the fourth skidded under the wheels of the tractor. Being fresh snow, the blood from the fourth deer sprayed, as the tractor ground up the poor hapless doe. All that was left was a bloody White Tail "rug". I thought that my son (a rather inexperienced hunter at that time) was going to puke. Heh, heh. One can always tell if a deer is hit by a car or pickup truck or a road tractor. The car or pickup truck leaves parts of the vehicle all over the roadway and the road tractor just leaves a bloody pulp. Welcome to the real world! Mike got over that rather quickly, however, as he soon discovered what a delicacey that venison is-----especially, slow grilled on an outside charcoal grill.
 

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Non Hunting Cold Feet Story...
I took my girlfriend home to northeast Montana in mid-winter. I planned to ask her to marry me. I wanted it to be outdoors because that was special to me. We went for a walk across the ice of a bay in the river and watched cedar waxwings pick berries off of russian olive trees. It was bright, crisp and very cold with hoarfrost on the trees. One of those absolutely beautiful but brutal cold days. We began to walk back across the ice...I was waiting for just the right moment. I stopped her and we faced each other. I just got the nerve up when she said,"My feet are cold! Let's get back to the car."
Well, that blew my nerve. Didn't get it back for another month or so either! I always joked with her that I would have asked her to marry me earlier but SHE got cold feet!
 

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There is a product called "Boot Blankets" which is basically a set of enormous, zip-up over-boots that you put on after you're in your stand or blind. They are a hassle to get to the stand and a bit of a pain to put on, but for those REALLY cold days, they work incredibly well. I don't even mess with them unless it's going to be zero or below, though and stopped using them in treestands because they're not easy to get on when you're up there. They're awesome for box or ground blinds, though.

I think it's a little funny that folks in the south get cold, but I guess everything is relative. For most of the folks I hunt with in WI and MI, anything above 20 and we start to get disappointed cuz it's too warm and the deer won't move as much. :D
 

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Hunting in cold

I went to Canada a few years back and being from Texas was not use to hunting in cold climates. It was -30 deg. and 2' of snow. I had gotten all the clothing you were suposed to need, even had boot blankets. I'll tell you this there aren't enough clothes to keep you warm in those conditions. Hunted in a box blind with heater and still thought I would loose my toes. One of my friends took his boots off and put on the boot blankets with hand warmers inside and he did alright. I shot my deer the first day and told them they couldn't make me go back out. I won't be going back to Canada hunting again.
 

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Sitting out in a blind in Texas with a Blue Northerner blowing in and someone left the barbwire fence gate open isn't exactly fun, either! :p
 

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I went to Canada a few years back and being from Texas was not use to hunting in cold climates. It was -30 deg. and 2' of snow. I had gotten all the clothing you were suposed to need, even had boot blankets. I'll tell you this there aren't enough clothes to keep you warm in those conditions. Hunted in a box blind with heater and still thought I would loose my toes. One of my friends took his boots off and put on the boot blankets with hand warmers inside and he did alright. I shot my deer the first day and told them they couldn't make me go back out. I won't be going back to Canada hunting again.
Ya'll'll think I'm nuts, but that sounds great to me! I would much rather freeze than sweat when I'm hunting. With the right gear, I can sit in an exposed treestand in 10 degree weather and not be uncomfortable...unless it's really blowing. In a good ground blind, I can hunt in any weather and be just fine. Must be the polar bear in me. :D
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Sitting in a blind is one of the worst things you can do to stay warm. Especially if it's off the ground and air can circulate under. The only other thing you can do that's worse is to get wet.

I have been colder sitting in a box blind at about 25 degrees, than when I was up in the mountains walking around at much lower temperatures. Granted, the walking around in the mountains was 15 or so years ago so I was a bit younger.

Just gotta keep moving in cold weather. I can't believe that it's possible to even stay alive at those temps sitting still!!!! :eek:
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Since losing almost 100 pds, none of my winter hunting clothes fit. I guess I am going to have to put them on the trading post or ebay. To expensive to give to goodwill. At least I will get the newest and warmest.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Hey, jodum - invite a good friend (preferably female) to share the clothes with you! :p
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Hey, jodum - invite a good friend (preferably female) to share the clothes with you! :p
Hmmmm, a nice young thing (female) to help keep my old joints warm.
But then again, "did we have to get up this early? I'm cold. I'm hot. What time is it? I'm hungry. I'm thirsty. You're not gonna shoot that pretty deer are you?"

Naw, I'll just buy some extra hand warmers........
 

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Well, guys, I live in Saskatchewan. The worst horror stories in this thread, are just "the way it is" for us at any time during hunting season. Lots of times it's nice too, most times in fact, but it can get cold. To bgr2014, I can only agree that no one can stay warm at -30C without moving around some. We change our hunting methods when necessary. Whoever told you to just sit there, knew you would slowly freeze, and didn't care.

When it's cold, deer move. It's a good time to hunt, but we don't sit on stands at that temperature.

I don't think you should blame all of Canada for one cold hunting experience. You were just unlucky with the weather and hunting advice.
 
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