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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever tried Color Case hardening parts of there revolvers, such as frames, screws, etc?
Is there a really good source for this information that covers the procedures and techniques?  
Somewhere in the back of my mind, I seem to remember a publication that described different techniques. They even described the "Syanide" method which gives the most "Unreal Colors Imaginable", but I have no doubt that you would need a #### of a lot of air circulation or something, else you would not be around when the metal came out of the "Cook"!!
Changeling
 

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It my understanding that the cyanide treatment gives color, but not any surface hardening like the real CCH treatment does.  CCH was almost a lost art before Doug Turnbull revitalized the process, and again, from what I understand, he guards his secrets jealously.  The basic mechanics are known, but the exact time, temp, and media are critical to give the rich and varied colors, along with a tough as nails skin that makes real CCH what it is.  Just look at the difference between a Ruger and Colt Cowboy and compare it to a Colt SAA that is CCHed by Doug.  Night and day.  Brownell's tech line can give you an idea of what is involved, but the equipment needed to do it right is not cheap I'm sure.  Personally, before I would invest a lot of time and money and them probably turn out an inferior product, I'd just send the piece to Turnbull and have it done right to begin with.  

(Edited by Big Bore at 7:34 pm on Oct. 13, 2001)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Big Bore thanks for the reply. I basically agree with you on everything! It's that, I just have this dam want, to know how things are done! I have no doubt that Mr. Turnbull would "fry my hide" when it comes to doing things right . But, I wouldn't know!!
In regard to the Cyanide method, It is my understanding it had no problem with depth of hardening, coloring being what most infasize as being superior.
But in my opinion "Cyanide" is best left to  "Bin Laden", but then again I would rather see some experimenting done on his backside WAY BEFORE technology/muslem Ilk.,  opened his door to to their promised land!!
changeling
 

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Hi, Guys:
  Brownells has a case coloring kit, &#361300+ with furnace, &#36260+ without (old catalogue). You might give them a holler and ask for the instruction booklet first. They've just got charcoal, no cyanide. Maybe they don't want to lose any customers <!--emo&:)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':)'><!--endemo-->

Bye
Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am aware of Brownels as much as I am aware of not even considering cyanide coloring. I ment this to be a discussion on "Case Coloring" methods and who had a book explaining the  different procedures. I am not interested in Cyanide in any way shape or form. I simply made a "statement that it was spectacular", Enough!! Back to the original implication, where is there a detailed explanation of the procedures.
Changeling
 

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"Gunsmith Kinks 4" from Brownells has detailed instructions. Roy Dunlap's "Gunsmithing" also has discussions of several hardening methods.
 
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