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The Colts Official Police model that i own was made between 1947 and 1969, i wonder if the occaisonal use of +P ammo would cause excessive wear in this old revolver?  i normally use target loads in it but would like the option of hot loads now and then,  what do you folks think of the strength of these older Colts?
 

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Gutpile

Seems no one else wants to tell you anything, so I will.

If you aren't familiar with the lineage of the Official Police, here it is.  The O.P. came directly from the Army Special and is the frame, known as the .41 frame, from which the Python was ultimately derived.  Back in the '60s it wasn't very uncommon to rechamber the O.P. to .357 Magnum.  Needless to say, this wasn't sanctioned by the factory, but it was done.  I had one for a while which was shot with full power .357 handloads with no ill results.  The biggest problem was, as you might expect, recoil.  At the time this was a quite light gun for the cartridge and was somewhat less than comfortable to shoot.

I think it is fair to say that any post WWII O.P. can be used with +P without any concern for the safety of the gun.  I am not sure at what date Colt began heat-treatiing their cylinders and frames, but it was probably before 1921 which is the date S&W began heat-treating cylinders.  If your gun is in good condition don't worry.  If it isn't healthy mechanically, don't shoot it at all until the problems have been corrected.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Thanks for the info!

One other suggestion.... contact Colt.

By the way, the difference between "standard" .38 Special and the "+P" rounds something like 3,000CUP.  So... odds are that a cylinderfull once a year would probably not hurt.  Anymore than that and you have to ask yourself what are you trying to accomplish with that gun?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks alk8944   i was beginning to think that old Colts didnt interest anyone     and mike, as far as what do i want to accomplish with the gun?    heck i dont know    i was just interested in the strength of the older colts, this is the first Colt DA i have owned, all my experiance has been with Rugers and Smiths.....thanks again guys.
 

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gp:
I can add my assurance to that of the other posters.  Sensible heavy loads are fine in OP's.
I've owned a couple of these fine guns. OP's made in the 30's, 40's and 50's are finely finished, accurate pieces which sell inexpensively because 'they aren't magnums'. I picked mine up as police surplus, one was 4"mint and appeared unfired in and out, the other was 6" excellent. I foolishly traded the 4" away, and the 6" is now my son's house gun.
Both were shot extensively with my standard .38 Special load which is a 160 gr. Plus-P loading. This load was very accurate in both guns and shot to the sights.
The Colts are a bit fragile in the lockwork... those vee mainsprings weaken  and hands are rather soft and prone to wear...you have to keep ahead of this or get misfires, which isn't good in a gun that is mainly a defensive tool. This is true of all the Colt revolvers, including the Python, so fixes are easily come by.
 
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