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Discussion Starter #1
As a novice at reloading I have avoided compressed loads. Having to now reload for my 6.8spc compressed loads are all that the Nosler manual shows for my 110gr accubond bullet. However the Lee manual using 110 gr jacketed bullet shows the same powders with sometimes even slightly more grains as normal or not compressed loads. Not sure what to make of that.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Different OAL. Different lots of brass, or different brands. Different lots of the same powder.

I wouldn't worry too much about it, if it is a published load, then just do the usual workup.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Agree with above. Most stick powders don't mind being a bit compressed. Ball powders are more sensitive. The Lyman 50th ed. does not list compressed loads using the 110 g V-Max bullet, however, the preamble for this cartridge cautions to work up slowly to the max listings.
 

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I'm a little confused by your wordage, so, please let me know if I am off topic.

I would stay with your avoidance of compressed loads,... I do.
I am not exactly a novice, been reloading for about 15 years, but, I have always avoided compressed loads, they make things a just little more complicated for me, that I don't like, or, want.

If you are trying to accomplish a certain velocity, but, the published load data for the powder you want to use is not to your liking, I would bite the bullet ;) and find a powder that will give you what you want, with less case capacity.

With the multitude of powders produced, we can pretty much have the individual end results we all want to accomplish,... imo.
 

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The Shadow
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Having to now reload for my 6.8spc compressed loads are all that the Nosler manual shows for my 110gr accubond bullet.
However the Lee manual using 110 gr jacketed bullet shows the same powders with sometimes even slightly more grains as normal or not compressed loads. Not sure what to make of that.
As stated by the previous gents. Powders are never "the same". If you look in your manuals or on the bottles, you'll see the caution to drop loads 10% when switching lots. That speaks to how different lots can be from "the same" powder. Similarly, manuals don't list lots or dates tested, meaning what is printed isn't exactly what you have.
Just start low and work your way up to accuracy.

Remember:
When you reach EITHER book max charge, OR book max velocity; you have reached book max pressure.

Cheers
 
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For some powders and loads compressed loads are unavoidable. I have several that are compressed long before they're max loads.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Same as gunpa. Three of my .223 loads (bolt guns) are compressed (Benchmark) but two of those are more components as in brass has less capacity.

My 35 Whelen and 30-06 IMP loads are heavily compressed (H4350) with a 250 grain Hornady and 165 grain Hornady respectively.

RJ
 

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Hmmm,... not one other powder option, without a compressed load?
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Check Post #3 above. The lyman book doesn't show compressed loads for their 110 gr V-Max.
 

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Compressed loads can be your friend. Never understood the fear of compressed loads. Unless the manual warns you NOT to do it, it is a fully approved technique.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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A drop tube, or just pouring the powder in the case more slowly, can solve the problem also.
 

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Agree with above. Most stick powders don't mind being a bit compressed. Ball powders are more sensitive.
An interesting experiment is to drop a volume of extruded powder, (something like 4350), and the same volume of ball powders, (W760 maybe), into a clear tube. Then weigh them. The extruded powder has more "air and space", and tolerates more compression. Loads with ball powders that need a lot of compression, which some do, often need a Magnum primer to ignite properly. I've compressed a couple ball powder loads, only to find they pushed the bullets back out before I got to the range. That's too much compression for sure.

To the OP, compressed loads are not bad or dangerous, and sometimes that just shoot the best. Otherwise a faster powder might be the answer.
 

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Just wondering; why fear compressed loads? I have been reloading since 1969 and have always trusted my published reloading manuals, even with "compressed" loads...
 

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I use a drop tube for R19 in my 338 WM. That powder gives me great velocities and good accuracy. Why give up 150 fps for a non compressed load? I'm not afraid of compressed loads that are still under max.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Fear compressed load because it sounds scary, I will try to get over that. I understand that looking at 3 load manuals ( I added another books data) is comparing apples to oranges as case, bullet, are not always identical, but have to be pretty darn similar. I did compare only the same powder if it was listed in all 3.I just was wondering for the compared powders why Nosler list almost every load given for 6.8spc as compressed and neither of the other 2 books list even one. Just curious I guess.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Don't sweat it, and if you don't care much for compressed loads, I'd say stay away from the .35 Rem as that's generally the rule, not the exception ;)

I compress stick powders a LOT in the .35 Rem. Seems to do no harm with the appropriate load data, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Nosler manual tested oal 2.245 nearly all loads compressed
Lee manual min oal 2.260 no compressed loads listed
that could be the difference, except
Hornaday tested oal 2.245 and no compressed loads
I give up
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You're thinking too hard. Set your OAL what YOU want it to be, then work up. If "compressing" the powder bothers you, and the case is starting to get pretty full, then just pour it in more slowly while gently tapping the side of the case. You'd be surprised (sometimes) how much more the powder can settle.

Either way, you're just putting "x" grains of powder (mass) in the case. How it got in there, and how the "excess" air got squeezed out, isn't all that big of a deal. As long as the bullet will stay seated and the load is safe, you are good to go.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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There is a certain "mystique" to compressed loads of one isn't "used" to them. Having been brought up reloading them as "the norm" the "mystic" was never an issue until I was asked by a fellow reloader to explain what "that long tube is for". An older Lyman manual that I can't recall the edition of tells the description of compressed loads pretty well and how to "use" them. If your load bulges the case, it might be too much.

Basically you load a couple of three rounds, measure the OAL and leave them set for a couple days and measure them again. If they haven't "grown" then you should be fine unless they "grow" in the magazine as the first ones are fired, then a crimp needs to be applied. The only one of my compressed loads that may grow is for the 35 Whelen, but it's always crimped and those rounds haven't appeared to grow.

ANnyways, nothing to fear from compressed loads as I see them.

RJ
 

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I think the fear comes from carrying over information that doesn't apply. For example, Hodgdon warns strongly not to compress their Trail Boss powder, as it raises pressure rapidly when you do. But that isn't how highly deterred rifle powders behave.
 
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