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Discussion Starter #1
hey guys. i was planning on building a rifle off a remington 700 action. i wanted to buy the action, bolt, barrel and stock for it. i know im going to have to send it to a gunsmith and have them install the barrel and maybe finish the chambering. my question is how much would it cost to send all the parts to a smith and have him finish it for me?
 

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I'm presuming you're going to build something on a short or standard-length action, so a 700 BDL is going to run you around $500. Make sure the gun you buy has the right length action and a bolt face that WILL fit the cartridge you want to end up with, otherwise you will spend a lot of extra money on a different bolt and possible modification to the magazine.

A new factory barrel can be surprisingly inexpensive and a well-made competition barrel can set you back $400, or more. Stocks can run anywhere from $125 to twice that much for a Hogue or McMillan and if you want a custom-made walnut stock...well, that can cost more than everything else, put together!

If the chambering you want is a common one and the 'smith has it in his shop you're still probably looking at several hundred dollars for him to mount the barrel, bed the action in the stock and ream/finish the chamber. Some barrels require additional finishing work and not all gunsmiths do this themselves, anymore, so that can be another hundred or two.

All told, you're looking at $1,500 to $2,000 depending on the scope you go with.

What is the cartridge you have in mind?
 

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There is a cheaper alternative, depending on the caliber you want. If you are set on the model 700 action, then Broom_Jm is correct.

Now if you were to find a doner rifle in a Savage Model 110, 111, 112 or 116 (long actions) or a model 10,11, 12 or 16 ( short actions) it could be a little cheaper.

You would be looking at 250- 275 for the barrel or more depending on if you want a brake or fluting.
Custom stock could be as much, unless you do not change the barrel taper, then the original stock could work or a drop in replacement could work, but keep in mind I have heard that not all drop is socks are 100 percent drop ins.

So say you find a doner rifle ( cheaper than buying the action from Savage) for 300.00.
Barrel cost ( factoring in stock taper, no flutting , and no break 250.00
Custom Stock - 200.00(including shipping)
Gunsmith charges - 200.00

So you are looking at just under a thousand bucks for it.


Also on the savage if you buy the barrel wrench and the go/no go guage you can do it yourself, and use the factory stock ( depending on caliber) you would be saving 400 dollars.

Now some of this is just guessing. I am building a 264 WM from a Savage Model 110 Magnum) All the pieces aren't in place yet, but I have most of the pieces in place. I will be setting the barrel myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well i was going to buy a match grade barrel in a 308, and most likely an hs precision stock or bell and carlson. i was going to buy just the action itself and then buy a berrel sperate from that and have the smith do the rest.
 

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Building a gun

I just finished a 1909 Mauser. I know it is not a Remington 700 but you can get some cost idea from what I had to shell out.

Action (bought 15 years ago) $125.00
Barrel - Shilen # 1 featherweight (also bought some time ago) - $175
Barrel installation - (got a Community College Gunsmith instructor to install it) $100.
Timney Trigger - $50 installed myself
Left hand safety - $20 installed myself.
bolt repositioned - Included in the rebarreling cost
(gunsmith bill for the followng $225.)
bolt jeweled and bolt relase jeweled
blued
drilled and tapped for scope
Scope rings and bases - $50
Richards Micro Fit stock - $ 205.
stock finishing supplies - $30 approx.
new cocking piece - $ 15.00
Glass bedding - $40.00 includes shipping.
Scope - $ 200.00
Total - $ 1235.00


I think that is about it. Seams like I forgot something. Oh my time. It took forever to finish that stock. But it sure does look good now.


Darin
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yea i thinnk some of the parts will be a little more expensice no big deal though. im more concerned about the service costs. that does help though. im thinking i mite use a duracoat finish im not sure yet
 

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yea i thinnk some of the parts will be a little more expensice no big deal though. im more concerned about the service costs. that does help though. im thinking i mite use a duracoat finish im not sure yet
If you get the duracoat id like to hear how it works out for you, im considering duracoating my m77 mkII ss/bp stock (something to make it a little less shiney in the feild. hope
your project goes well.
 

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I remember the costs of my very first rifle I had built. Back in late 1967, I ordered a Cadet Martini action (When you could still get one without an FFL), paid $35 for one in "Top Condition", sent it to a barrel maker in St. Louis (Nu-Line Guns, Inc.) & had them barrel it for the .17 Ackley Bee with premium barrel which ran $75. Also had them reblue the action & barrel and fit it to a Cadet Martini Stock which I bought for $45. Shipping ran about $15 each way, so my Custom single shot cost under $200. BUT this was back in the late 1960's. The last rifle I had custom work done on was reboring to a diifferent caliber and that ran $95 + $25 shipping back to me, this was back around 1978.
 

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I remember the costs of my very first rifle I had built. Back in late 1967, I ordered a Cadet Martini action (When you could still get one without an FFL), paid $35 for one in "Top Condition", sent it to a barrel maker in St. Louis (Nu-Line Guns, Inc.) & had them barrel it for the .17 Ackley Bee with premium barrel which ran $75. Also had them reblue the action & barrel and fit it to a Cadet Martini Stock which I bought for $45. Shipping ran about $15 each way, so my Custom single shot cost under $200. BUT this was back in the late 1960's. The last rifle I had custom work done on was reboring to a diifferent caliber and that ran $95 + $25 shipping back to me, this was back around 1978.
Absolutely nothing is cheap anymore when it comes to guns. When I was a teenager, our local gunsmith used to charge 5 dollars to mount a scope and 5 dollars to bore sight it, and if you bought the scope from him, it was free.

He used to charge 10 dollars for glass bedding. Trigger adjustment was 10 dollars.

Buy the recoil pad from him, and he would install it for free. Stock refinishing was 20 to 25 dollars.

He has sinced retired and pass on, he was cheap and he was good.

The first box of shells I bought for my 270 Win back in 1986 cost $7.99. That was for a box of federal's. I wish I still had that box with the price tag on it. Come to think of it, my Savage Model 110 270 with a 4 power bushnell cost me 179.99.
 

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I've got a preWWII Czech BRNO 98 action that I've been planning on building a 9,3x62 Scout rifle. Been looking at what I've going to need and a new CZ 550 in 9.3mm will be alot cheaper.

CD
 

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Absolutely nothing is cheap anymore when it comes to guns. When I was a teenager, our local gunsmith used to charge 5 dollars to mount a scope and 5 dollars to bore sight it, and if you bought the scope from him, it was free.

He used to charge 10 dollars for glass bedding. Trigger adjustment was 10 dollars.

Buy the recoil pad from him, and he would install it for free. Stock refinishing was 20 to 25 dollars.

He has sinced retired and pass on, he was cheap and he was good.

The first box of shells I bought for my 270 Win back in 1986 cost $7.99. That was for a box of federal's. I wish I still had that box with the price tag on it. Come to think of it, my Savage Model 110 270 with a 4 power bushnell cost me 179.99.
The same was true, back in Indiana, where I am from & grew-up. I remember as you, when things that we're charged for today were free & "Goodwill Policy" back in the Good "Ole" Days. I remember when a box of Winchester 130 grain Silvertips cost $4.95, & you could buy a Remington Model 600 or Model 788 for under a $100!!!! Things have certainly changed......FOR THE WORSE! :(
 

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I've got a preWWII Czech BRNO 98 action that I've been planning on building a 9,3x62 Scout rifle. Been looking at what I've going to need and a new CZ 550 in 9.3mm will be alot cheaper.

CD

I'd buy the CZ 550 in 9.3 m/m instead of building a custom rifle that might have issues.:)
 

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What has our society come to when even the most durable of goods (firearms) are "throw-away" because it's cheaper to buy new than it is to refurbish something old? It makes you wonder how well-made the new stuff is, or if the gunsmiths are charging too much for the work they do? Maybe it's just typical inflation, but it seems to me that the cost of gunsmithing services have gone up at a faster rate than the cost of a new gun.
 

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Production has come a long way. Companies have less hands on and are able to mass produce them with little labor cost per unit. A custom firearm is done in seperate pieces from differant companies with more hands on. Buy a car piece by piece and have a mechanic assemble it and see what it cost. I'm thinking of having an old M98 that has all the work done on it previously by my grandfather rebarreled from 06 to 338-06 and restocked. I know it will be cheaper to buy a good used one.
 

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What has our society come to when even the most durable of goods (firearms) are "throw-away" because it's cheaper to buy new than it is to refurbish something old? It makes you wonder how well-made the new stuff is, or if the gunsmiths are charging too much for the work they do? Maybe it's just typical inflation, but it seems to me that the cost of gunsmithing services have gone up at a faster rate than the cost of a new gun.
With the alloys of the metals these days, and the engineering involved today most rifles are as good if not better than the rifles are grandfathers carried.

I never met my great grandfather or my grandfather, but my great grandfather had three guns his entire life. He had a 20 ga pump shotgun, a 22 rimfire, and an old 30-30 that had duck tape holding the stock together. I have both the shotgun and the 22 rimfire. They both still work and shoot just fine. The old 30-30 was lost in a fire before I was born, I don't know all the details.


My grandfather had a 25-06 for years, my grandmother sold the rifle after he died. Again before I was born, and I have his Colt 1911. And it still fires. As far as I know he never owned anything else.
 

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well i was going to buy a match grade barrel in a 308, and most likely an hs precision stock or bell and carlson. i was going to buy just the action itself and then buy a berrel sperate from that and have the smith do the rest.
Have you considered getting a 700 already chambered in .308? I see lots of excellent rigs going for well under $1000 on AA and GB. Then you could upgrade one item at a time if/when you felt the need.

As a side note:
A friend of mine had an old 700 Mountain rifle he was considering selling. He paid me $30 to "clean it up, shoot it and measure the group." He wanted to sell/trade for a heavy-bbl sniper rig "to hunt deer with." I completely cleaned the action [found the stock was glassed], stripped the copper out of the bbl, set the trigger to break @3.5lbs, and shot 5 into .8" @100yds. He kept the rifle.
 

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When you have a gun built, it is far removed from what you buy off the shelf. The more you can describe just what you want to the smith, the closer he can get to building the perfect rifle for your needs. He needs to know the action type, how long you want the bbl, the taper (which has to do with final weight), the twist rate, if you want SS or CM, what type rings and bases, the glass, the type of stock as well as the color and material and the list goes on. A true smith wil probably ask you questions you had not thought about. How far will you shoot? Are you going up a 10K mountain? Do you hand load? Do you hunt open areas or hvy timber? If you are going to spend the money for a custom rifle, all these things come into play. If you are demanding in the accuracy department, pay a little extra for action and bolt work. If you have to scrimp, don't do it with the bbl. A good gunsmith is worth every penny he charges (if he is honest). I say this not because I am one but because of what I see coming from a lot of other shops. A lot of what we do must be done correctly the first time. You only get the chance to drill a hole in the right place one time. On the other hand, a customers friend had a f-pn put in a Llama 45 and was charged 140.00. It is folks like that who hurt the gun smith trade. A full line gunsmith could buy a very nice used truck for the money he has just in hand tools. A electrician with 1 helper along with his son worked at my place for 6.5 hrs and I got a bill for 549.00; dern near made me change trades.
 

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Agree that modern design and machining make a big difference in current manufacturing precision. Quite a number of guns, with the right load, can make sub-moa out of the box now, and that sure didn't used to be true. The Savages seem to be the most gun for the money in that regard, anymore, but even they are climbing in price.

As to the cost of labor, inflation and modern overhead are the cause. Few gunsmith's without name recognition can make a reasonable living in that trade now.

According to this handy CPI calculator, $1 in the mid-60's is about $7 in 2010 money. So, if you're my age, what passed for pricing in my teens would be multiplied by seven today. Pre-1968 you didn't have to pay FFL fees or comply with FFL storage requirements. Your taxes were small compared to today, and you didn't have to carry liability insurance. Your kids were less likely to go to college and didn't think it was their birthright to have you buy them a car while they were still in high school. You didn't have cell phones, cable TV, air conditioning, and $13K a year in medical insurance for a family of four. You had a house with 1/3 to 1/2 the square footage most people expect to have now, and the government didn't charge you nearly such a amount of rent on your home in the form of property tax. I expect those factors easily make up for added differences. Modern overhead is out of control.
 

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With the alloys of the metals these days, and the engineering involved today most rifles are as good if not better than the rifles are grandfathers carried.
There is a flip side to this, and it means they can manufacture the same rifle for even cheaper (and end up with something similar) and save some money. The Ruger 10/22 is a good example. There's a world of a difference between one made today and one 10 years ago (plastic components, terribly cheap finishes, rough machining, etc.)

It seems like lots of manufacturers are also putting out budget priced models that are cheaply made and similar to their flagships- like the Remington 770 and the Savage Edge.

Back to the subject... I would be wary of trying to find the absolute cheapest to do your barrel work. You get what you pay for, and a poor chamber job or barrel fitting could spell a big headache down the road. Same goes for bedding and stock work. It can be done cheaply, but there's the good, the bad, and the ugly out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
ok. lots of great info. does anyone know of any good smiths who maybe they sent it out to or had heard good stories from?
 
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