Shooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any one hunting coyotes at night? If so what are you using to see them when they come into range? Methods? Any info would be appreciated. I have about 100 acres to hunt and am getting a lot of traffic from coyotes so time to thin them out. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
I hunt coyotes quite a bit, but never at night because it's simply dangerous in my view. I call them during the day. Calling coyotes is one of the most exciting and demanding types of hunting we do, and we spend more time in any given year doing that than we do big game hunting. Give it a try.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,819 Posts
Red filters work but make sure they're slightly 'frosted' instead of having 'facets' of any kind. Many red lens are designed to call attention by glitter. I'm convinced coyotes see that and stay just far enough away to turn into an antelope instead. :eek:
 
  • Like
Reactions: rum4

·
The Shadow
Joined
·
7,687 Posts
Depends on the 100ac and your backstop.
So out here we talk about fields in the irrigated projects as 125ac, and the dryland in sections (square miles). We just use spotlights and regular scopes on our to rifles. Depends upon the terrain and such, but you can pick them up easily by 300 yards. The trouble is depth perception. If they are coming across the canyon at a known distance it's fine. If you catch them in one of the fields, then it's tough to judge distance of they aren't close.

Out here they tend to be creatures of general habit in their travels, most are taken within 30 yards and classically with a shotgun.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rum4

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
The full moon is going to be here for a couple days. Hunker down in your favorite stand, and wait till they show themselves. Thermacell, bug spray, (if it's warm enough there) and don't forget the caller. Use it sparingly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,819 Posts
I had an experience with a full moon coyote last year. My GSP barks at satellites going over so he's got a hair trigger anyway. About four in the morning, a coyote did that YeOW!! alert bark that set off the dog like a fire alarm. In ten minutes or so, after Pete was back asleep the 'yote would yeowl again. After a while it got to be tiring! About five in the morning with only a hint of gray in the east but a glaring full moon about to set in the west shining right in the coyotes eyes. I thought it would be easy. I eased out to the shooting bench with a triple deuce and a sandbag and waited for the coyote to show, run, howl or hide. He yeowled right in my FACE! He was RIGHT THERE.....where? I waited and watched through the scope right where he absolutely HAD to be only 80 yards out in the sage brush. It took four yeowls for me to see his lips move when he did it. From there an ear and glimpse of eye told me how he was situated behind a sage brush not even knee high and shot him.
I would have thought I could have seen that 'yote with the naked eye and might have eventually, but for about twenty minutes I was staring at him through a 10X Leupold without seeing a hair.
 
  • Like
Reactions: broom_jm and rum4

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,652 Posts
I hunt coyotes quite a bit, but never at night because it's simply dangerous in my view. I call them during the day. Calling coyotes is one of the most exciting and demanding types of hunting we do, and we spend more time in any given year doing that than we do big game hunting. Give it a try.
I know you are well experienced so no offence meant, but it is only dangerous if a) you have not checked out the ground your shooting on background etc. and b) Identified your target.
Here in the UK we shoot a lot of foxes at night with lamps, usually one lamping one shooting from a vehicle. We are a little more tightly packed in the UK, than in the wilds of Sasks area so have to take background very seriously, we also have little muntjac deer not much bigger than a fox, so have to 100% identify the target. The DANGER is the NUT behind the trigger.

I use a red filtered hand lamp to pick out the fox initially and then I have an amber lamp on top of the scope for the shot. We have dimmer switches on the lamps to reduce the glare.
Like coyotes, once missed on a light and even with a caller foxes are educated. You will see a flick of eyes and they're gone.

100 acres here is often the whole farm:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Saskshooter, I say at night cause I have cameras out and have never captured one on the camera in daylight. I have plenty at night. I'll try the daylight but they don't seem to move in the day light.
Thanks to everyone that responded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,695 Posts
I haven't started purposely hunting coyotes, but will when I can make the time. I see them day and night, in person and on camera. Alabama doesn't allow night hunting unfortunately. It would sure help keep the feral pig population down if they didn't have the "safe time" after dark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
Saskshooter, I say at night cause I have cameras out and have never captured one on the camera in daylight. I have plenty at night. I'll try the daylight but they don't seem to move in the day light.
Thanks to everyone that responded.
The whole point of calling is that they WILL move to investigate a call that they find interesting, even in daylight. In addition, although the coyotes around here are dominantly nocturnal, almost any drive around the country in morning or late afternoon is very likely to see a coyote mousing in fields or just travelling. We don't believe coyotes here sleep the whole daylight time period at all.

As to the danger, Sus, I almost always know the country very well, but the fact that we can very successfully call coyotes and other predators in daylight makes night hunting a waste of good sleep. There is no need to do it, so not being able to see is just not worth any risk at all. You use vehicles in ways that are illegal here too. I suppose our feelings about shooting rifles in the dark may be "unnecessary" but so is shooting in the dark for us, so we just don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Y'all use electronic calls or hand calls? I'm thinking of investing in a electronic call.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,652 Posts
I've shot a fair few coyotes when down in Texas and always in the day time. Did have a drive round with the ranch foreman and his boys one night but saw only raccoons and skunks. The simplest and most effective call down there was a glass bottle and a piece of polystyrene. Damp the glass slightly and you can produce everything from whimpers to screams that will set your hair on end. Mind your calling close quarters and only on senderos would you get a view more than a hundred yards, or round a tank. Nothing gets the blood running faster than the sound of a pack yipping and yapping, getting closer and closer, then going quiet.
You need eyes in the back of your head then. Had them just appear in the middle of a pipeline before now and never saw them imerge from the mesquite. Do I miss it ...your darn right I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,246 Posts
I hunt them and tried the red spotlight with a call.

Like Saskshooter, I didn't shoot as just seeing red eyes wasn't enough for me to pull the trigger. I hunt natl forset miles from houses and roads. But real was uncomfortable about shooting 'eyes'. friends do it and say things like; you can tell from the height of the eyes above the ground, or the distance between the eyes. Sorry, in hilly areas a doe 90 yards off and walking up a small valley grade looks to be close to the ground.

First light is my time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,819 Posts
Ghost Dogs!! I admired them at (long) distance but shoot those within range. ;)

I said something about 'yotes turning to goats because a GS student was going to get rich when hides were $100 on the hoof. He bought a call and red spot lights and a Mini-14 and shot 6 antelope the first night. That put him out of business and he didn't graduate, either.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikekoch

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
Y'all use electronic calls or hand calls? I'm thinking of investing in a electronic call.
I have emailed this in response to questions from a new coyote hunter in another context, but I will post it here because of that question. I feel a bit hesitant to do so because this is what we do, where we live, for our coyotes, and may not apply directly to your situation, but it gives an idea about how we have come to think about hunting coyotes.

I believe the best method of hunting predators is to call them. Waiting at baits, or just watching an area can work on occasion, but it can also be a long, cold, futile wait. We don’t enjoy that much, so this advice is about how we call coyotes, foxes etc.

The first rule of coyote hunting is to hunt where there are coyotes. You can not know for sure if there are coyotes in a specific area without seeing recent sign. Coyotes travel quite a bit, and I don’t know how “pretty large” your area is, but unless you see recent sign, they may be out of the area for a while. Snow is the best medium for knowing where they are. We sometimes just drive slowly down back roads looking for tracks after a recent snow or blow. No tracks at all, we usually don’t bother calling that area at that time. So, other than just having a look around for areas that will work as good calling set ups (as has already been suggested in the thread) there is little you can do right now that will matter much.

We call coyotes that have been called before and not killed "educated" coyotes. If yours are educated, and hunting pressure will educate many for sure, they will be very hard to call. You may have to try something "different" to get their curiosity aroused. That is a very wide topic, so I will stick to generalities we use as SOP.

If they know you are there, they will not come. No sky lining; no walking across open areas if possible; stick to edges; use depressions; do not be easily visible from far away at any time.

No noise. You are going to call an animal with a sound, so don't make any that sound like coyote hunters. No talking; no slamming truck doors; no noise you can avoid; approaching the area while keeping a ridge between you and the area masks sound well.

Control your scent plume so it does not enter the area you intend to call to. We do not use any scent masking soaps, sprays, clothing, or whatever, because we believe they are useless and the only way to avoid a coyote's nose is to not let him smell you. One exception is we will often deliberately allow our scent into an open area down wind. Often coyotes will circle down wind to get a smell of what's making the noise. If the open area is large enough, they must expose themselves to do so. Often, in that moment they get your scent, they will stop to think it over for a few seconds. THAT is a good time to shoot, because they will likely leave after they decide what you are.

Break up your outline somehow. Brush in front (as long as you have a shooting lane) or behind you will do that. Do not move around any more than you must. We like to hunt in pairs. One guy gets fairly hidden, sometimes giving up long range vision, and does the calling. The other sets up to cover the approaches from an angle that allows him to see well, but the animal will be looking elsewhere for the source of the sounds. Decoys can work for this distraction too, if you are alone.

Although we have used electronic calls successfully, we use mouth calls almost exclusively. We walk lots and we hate carrying crap. That's the only reason to avoid the electronics that we can think of; that and the cost, and cold batteries. We have howlers, but use them mostly for "location" calls and then move in and use "dying prey" type calls. We believe only dominant animals will readily approach a stranger in their territory, so howlers seen to us less productive than prey type calls. We want the insecure ones too.

Call "softly" the first time in case they are close; you don't want to scare them. We call for 30 seconds to a minute and then sit for 5 and watch. The next set of calls can be louder. Watch very, very carefully. Binoculars are a real help, even in the bush. You cannot pay too much attention. Around here, if you see a magpie coming to the call, pay close attention to that direction. Coyotes and magpies hang out a lot together. You must pay attention to the really unexpected directions too. Make head movements slow and steady rather than quick glances. Move nothing more than you have to.

The length of time we call a particular set up depends on how long we think a coyote would take to come from the farthest ranges we think the call is reaching. Wind knocks down calls really quickly, so your range is short. Calling from a ridge on a calm evening will reach a long way. Experience is likely the only teacher here. We have had coyotes over half an hour into the set, but most of the time 15 minutes will tell you what you need to know.

Be very careful once you decide the set is done. Stand up slowly and have a long look around. The new angle will reveal all those coyotes you called but have not yet seen (and there will be a depressingly large number of them). You may get a shot if you don't create too much of a spectacle so that the dog has to figure out what the H*** just moved. But chances will not last long.

If you are going to just move and try again, don't talk, don't make noise, don't expose yourselves any more than you must. They may be watching. We move far enough to enter a "new" area that we think holds animals that have not heard us. In a big wind that may not be far; on a calm day that may be half a mile or more. We avoid calling the same area more than a couple of times a winter. Educated coyotes and all that.

Shooting sticks or tripods are essential. We use .22-250s or .243 and one 6mm Rem as dedicated coyote rifles. We have come to believe coyotes are, pound for pound, a very tough animal. They are also small targets. You need to be able to shoot well, and shoot quickly at times with some honest power too. Multiples get really interesting. We agree before hand about left side/right side etc. and who will shoot first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
760 Posts
I don't hunt at night; those days/nights are long time over. Evenings and nights will find me on the sofa either reading or watching TV, or in bed. I lived in Georgia for 62 years and coyotes were everywhere. I only ever shot one. I was in a deer stand when a good looking guy walked by; couldn't resist this time so I shot him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
I use a red filtered floodlight to quickly sweep the area for eye shine then switch to an ATN X-sight with an aftermarket illuminator if there is no moon. You can clearly see 3-400 yards under most conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,019 Posts
They are Predators so I hunt them year round every chance that I can get, With May & June Coming, The Doe's will soon be dropping Their Fawn's So its the perfect time to be out there with Decoys etc. And cut down on some of those Deer Eaters etc. Be it Day or Night etc.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top