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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering, considering the uppper limit of loading for the .45 that I've been doing (not very top, but supposedly "high" pressures), how one determines the proper crimp....is there a too much or too little (I know there is, but really, how does one know the proper crimp for the pressures, etc., when loading these heavy cast bullets?)...??  Thanks again,  
Greenhorn
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Good question... and a difficult one to answer.

First, if the unfired rounds in the gun are not jumping the crimp, you're probably OK.

Second, the crimp is not the most important thing.  Case neck tension on the bullet is.  So, measure your expander and ensure that it is a good 0.004"-0.005" less than the bullet diameter.  This will solve many 'crimping' problems.

As far as crimping goes, I seat the bullets so that the case mouth covers all but a tiny sliver of the crimp groove (but don't crimp).  Then, with the seating stem backed off where it won't contact the bullet, I adjust the die so that the case mouth is folded into the crimp groove as much as possible.

When seating and crimping in separate steps, you can feel how much crimp you are getting.  When you get a good solid bump on the handle that's about right.  Too much crimp and you'll likely buckle the case, so don't get too carried away.  You just sort of have to experiment a little.

Does that help?
 

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In addition to the well placed advice already given, I might add that for the .45 Colt heavy loads and .454 Casul loads that employ heavy bullets, and have a tendency to "jump crimp", there's no finer solution than using a Redding Profile crimp die, and as already mentioned, always seat and crimp in two separate steps.

As far as over-crimping, yes, with conventional roll-crimp dies you can certainly over-do a good thing, as the heavily applied roll crimp will pull the case neck out away from the bullet slightly to make the sharp bend into the crimping groove caused from an excessively heavy roll type crimp applied by conventional loading dies.  This will actually reduce the neck/case tension on the bullet, and be counter-productive to uniform start pressures on your handloads.

For your application, I think that the Redding Profile Crimp Die is about the best you'll be able to find.

Hope this helps!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Can someone please explain the differences and/or advantage of the Redding Profile Crimp die and the Lee Factory Crimp Die. When do you use one or the other?
 

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I don't understand the Redding Profile Crimp Die at all. I was just beginning to understand headspacing and the Lee Factory Crimp Die, when I read this? When do you use one vs. the other?


Marshall Stanton said:
In addition to the well placed advice already given, I might add that for the .45 Colt heavy loads and .454 Casul loads that employ heavy bullets, and have a tendency to "jump crimp", there's no finer solution than using a Redding Profile crimp die, and as already mentioned, always seat and crimp in two separate steps.

As far as over-crimping, yes, with conventional roll-crimp dies you can certainly over-do a good thing, as the heavily applied roll crimp will pull the case neck out away from the bullet slightly to make the sharp bend into the crimping groove caused from an excessively heavy roll type crimp applied by conventional loading dies.  This will actually reduce the neck/case tension on the bullet, and be counter-productive to uniform start pressures on your handloads.

For your application, I think that the Redding Profile Crimp Die is about the best you'll be able to find.

Hope this helps!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Is the Redding Profile Crimp die better to use on these loads than the Lee Factory Crimp Die?

Marshall Stanton said:
In addition to the well placed advice already given, I might add that for the .45 Colt heavy loads and .454 Casul loads that employ heavy bullets, and have a tendency to "jump crimp", there's no finer solution than using a Redding Profile crimp die, and as already mentioned, always seat and crimp in two separate steps.

As far as over-crimping, yes, with conventional roll-crimp dies you can certainly over-do a good thing, as the heavily applied roll crimp will pull the case neck out away from the bullet slightly to make the sharp bend into the crimping groove caused from an excessively heavy roll type crimp applied by conventional loading dies.  This will actually reduce the neck/case tension on the bullet, and be counter-productive to uniform start pressures on your handloads.

For your application, I think that the Redding Profile Crimp Die is about the best you'll be able to find.

Hope this helps!

God Bless,

Marshall
 
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