Shooters Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been reloading my .45 Colt with 255gr Lead RNFP bullets and 5.5gr of TITEGROUP. The final step in my reloading is crimping. I just crimp it enough to get a firm grip on the lead.

The crimp is not a big deal with the revolver, but I'm concerned about each bullet's crimp when I start using them in a lever gun. I don't want the recoil working the bullet down inside the brass of the rounds in the magazine.

How tight can I make the crimp without creating too much pressure to be dangerous? I know that's probably a hard one to answer without seeing the crimp I'm applying, but anything will help.

If this will help, I'm using a Lee 4-hole turret press with carbide dies.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Two-Bits
Try pressin' your reloads against your bench or a table top by holdin' em in yer hand and puttin' your weight on em. Ifin' they don't move then they won't move in yer rifle either.
The crimp strength is also dependent on the springiness of your brass, Old hard brass doesn't hold as tight as less used softer brass.
Pressure unless your right at the max shouldn't go outa limits with a firm crimp, ifin' yer at max throttle now back her off a bit and work back up, Safety First!!!
I use a Lee 4-holer too and really like it!!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,165 Posts
Crimp away man. Overcrimping would cause noticable deformity. You are only working the very end of the brass. Overcrimping will cause your brass to not last as long but like Two-Bits says you would have to have some other things causing high pressure for the crimp to put you over the top. Consistancey is the answer from round to round and batch to batch and year to year. Agood way to learn a good crimp is to try to duplicate factory bullet appearance.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top