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I am not pickey
But there are things I won't eat if I do not have too. If I had too as in no other choice I would eat you.
There are two groups of people I have run across in my life that seem to be willing to eat anything Cajuns and Chinese.
Islander
 

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I like the wild pigs I shoot in Central California. They feed mostly on barley, grown by the ranchers for their cattle. I keep the loins and ribs whole. I have the rest ground up and packed in 5 pound bags. I buy pork butts at Costco or Sam's, mix the wild and the store bought pork 50/50 for delicious sausage.
 

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I have to ask, Mr. fatwhiteboy, why do you waste money buying bland store bought pork to dilute the "wild"--really just feral--pork that you shoot that has better, fuller flavor in the first place? Are you just trying to extend it? If so, I understand. But if you are trying to improve it, you're operating in reverse. Making good sausage I know costs about $.75 to $1 per pound of finished product just for the herbs and spices, and keeping that fuller flavor pork in the mix is well worth it. Why dilute it? Inquiring minds like to know.
 

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Simple- Fat content. The wild boar and the feral hogs are much leaner. Sometimes I will buy beef fat trimmings from the butcher to add to the pork if it looks too lean. Fat is flavor.
 

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Yup. If you get a feral pig with hardly any fat, the sausage will resemble a really tasty shoe, ground up in a casing :eek:

Been there, done that! With enough fat on a feral pig (good acorn crop helps) then adding more domestic pig may not be needed.
 

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My butcher uses fat from different domestic animals depending on the wild game I'm having sausage made from and what type of sausage, I don't bother asking anymore he has it figured out through years of experimenting. Being a big fan of all things pork you would think pork fat would be perfect for everything but he uses beef fat in all the Antelope sausage he makes, claims it's better tasting.
Always wanted to try feral pig sausage or even the loin.
 

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I promised my family venison my first year hunting with my own-made rifle. I was 14 and had shot four wild hogs before my first deer. My dad said, "Keep them hogs comin.".
Even the rankest of boar hogs is better than a wild goat on a sandspur diet. I tried one of those on a week-long 'survival camp' on a barrier island. The redwing blackbirds were better.
 

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I appreciate the explanation regarding my question to Mr, fatwhieboy. I will point out, as a Ph.D. in meat science, that the flavor is almost totally in the fat. Then it comes down to what you prefer, weather plain ground meat (with some fat, of course) or spice/herb flavored sausage, it's all in your personal preference. I have my preferences, but that means nothing to you (or anyone). If you prefer your meat ground with beef fat, great, or if you prefer it with pork fat, great--it's personal. I've been experimenting with mixtures--but I personally find I still prefer beef fat for burger, pork fat for sausages. Each to their own. An exception is ground goose breast (which I am fortunate to get a lot of), I have found that meat ground simply to be burger is best with a mix of beef and pork fat, but so is sausage, such as salome made with the same. I recently made a batch of 1/3 goose breast and 2/3 venison (deer, antelope, elk) with beef fat--the jury is still out, but we're finding it pretty good. I'm thinking to try the same meat mix with my favorite sausage blend, but pork fat instead of beef fat. I have high expectations.
 

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Wild Duck Bad Taste?

I don't kill or eat any waterfowl or should it be spelled water-foul, wild ducks taste like the bottom of a muddy pond and geese taste like Kentucky bluegrass. Yum! not.
There are some ducks, particularly diving ducks,that have a strong taste. These are gumbo ducks. Cook a dark roux. After boning the duck (or simply use the breast,heart and gizzard) cut into cubes as best you can, season then brown in oil before you add to the roux. Of course there is a lot more than that to a good gumbo. A good duck gumbo turns that strong taste into a very rich flavor. There are as many duck gumbo recipes as there are cooks, but I can send you a good one if you are interested.

Same for a goose. Speckle Bellies will bake like a chicken or a domestic duck. Blues and Snows are gumbo geese.

Want a real treat. Coots are terribly strong tasting, essentially in-eatable. They have a gizzard the size of a baseball. Coot gizzards are wonderful. Nothing much better than a coot gizzard gumbo. I do not know what the limit is now, but they were once very liberal.

Soft Shell and Snapping Turtles make a wonderful Sauce Picante. Sort of similar to a gumbo, but I cook a Sauce Picante roux twice; once with flour and oil and again adding tomato paste. At low water on Lake Okeechobee one could often catch a big Soft Shell in the shallow water. Catch them on a sandy bottom and two guys could usually coral a pretty big one. Put him in the bottom of the air boat and he owned it. Would have to walk around on the gunnels until I got home and watch for that long neck. They can be fast and fearless.
 

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Ate possum once at Gramps. I caught it, (un)dressed it, he cooked it. Went across street to their place ate dinner. Dont really remember much about it (12 yo).
Possums take special treatment. My grandmother, when I was a kid living in the pinny woods of north central Louisiana, would put the possum in a chicken coop and feed it table scraps for a couple of weeks. By the way, we did not shoot the possums, my uncles caught them. After a couple of weeks she claimed they were "cleaned out". Then she would bake the possum with sweet potatoes. I do not remember what it taste like, but do remember looking forward to possum and "sweet tators". As an addendum, I would not eat a possum now. I have seen too many crawl out from under a dead cow finishing off what the buzzards left. I guess what I did not know at the time did not hurt me.

JBelk, redwings are OK. Cardinals and Yellow Shafted Flickers are very good. In fact, cardinals are excellent eating. I sure hope the statute of limitations has expired. Probably was no law back then, anyway.
 
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There are some ducks, particularly diving ducks,that have a strong taste. These are gumbo ducks. Cook a dark roux. After boning the duck (or simply use the breast,heart and gizzard) cut into cubes as best you can, season then brown in oil before you add to the roux. Of course there is a lot more than that to a good gumbo. A good duck gumbo turns that strong taste into a very rich flavor. There are as many duck gumbo recipes as there are cooks, but I can send you a good one if you are interested.

Same for a goose. Speckle Bellies will bake like a chicken or a domestic duck. Blues and Snows are gumbo geese.

Want a real treat. Coots are terribly strong tasting, essentially in-eatable. They have a gizzard the size of a baseball. Coot gizzards are wonderful. Nothing much better than a coot gizzard gumbo. I do not know what the limit is now, but they were once very liberal.

Soft Shell and Snapping Turtles make a wonderful Sauce Picante. Sort of similar to a gumbo, but I cook a Sauce Picante roux twice; once with flour and oil and again adding tomato paste. At low water on Lake Okeechobee one could often catch a big Soft Shell in the shallow water. Catch them on a sandy bottom and two guys could usually coral a pretty big one. Put him in the bottom of the air boat and he owned it. Would have to walk around on the gunnels until I got home and watch for that long neck. They can be fast and fearless.
I would rather watch ducks than kill them especially the wood ducks here are a beautiful bird. I used to kill a few geese every year until the licenses got so expensive, I'd rather buy a couple of farm raised ones that really taste good.
A couple of years ago I killed a big snapper in one of Gary's ponds, holy sh!+ are they hard to skin!
Gave up after messing with it for what seemed like forever, waiting for a southerner that's done it all his life to show me how, I shoot them on a regular basis, they drag full size ducks under and drown them, nasty little creature that pre-dates the dinosaurs. They haven't survived 200 million years by being nice to the rest of the animal world.
 

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I don't duck hunt anymore. I stopped after I moved back home from Florida. In Florida I had Lake Okeechobee which was a duck hunter's paradise. I mostly hunted the marshes in a big Grumman square stern canoe. Too expensive in Louisiana. There are some places one can hunt ducks without several thousand a year to rent a blind in a rice field, but they are few and far between (at least in the northern part of the state). On the river behind the house we have Wood Ducks that nest each year on the opposite bank. During wet years we have mostly Wood Ducks because the local swamps are filled with water and the ducks are scattered all over. During a dry year we get ducks on the river that are seldom seen around here and lots of them. They concentrate where the water is.

As for the turtles, I do not kill a snapper any more. They are becoming rare. It takes a fair sized turtle to make enough meat to fool with. It takes a long time to grow a fair sized turtle. Just do not have the heart any more to kill a big snapper. I have no hesitation to take a soft shell, but I cannot get out and hunt them any more.

I was at a fellow's pond when I was in high school, fishing for bass from the shore line. Along came one of his big domestic ducks with a parade of little ones behind her. There were six little ones behind her when she started across the pond. A big snapper took them down, one by one, rear most first. She had one remaining little one when she reached the bank. Sure would have liked to have that one in the pot. He is probably still there eating ducks.
 
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I don't duck hunt anymore. I stopped after I moved back home from Florida. In Florida I had Lake Okeechobee which was a duck hunter's paradise. I mostly hunted the marshes in a big Grumman square stern canoe. Too expensive in Louisiana. There are some places one can hunt ducks without several thousand a year to rent a blind in a rice field, but they are few and far between (at least in the northern part of the state). On the river behind the house we have Wood Ducks that nest each year on the opposite bank. During wet years we have mostly Wood Ducks because the local swamps are filled with water and the ducks are scattered all over. During a dry year we get ducks on the river that are seldom seen around here and lots of them. They concentrate where the water is.

As for the turtles, I do not kill a snapper any more. They are becoming rare. It takes a fair sized turtle to make enough meat to fool with. It takes a long time to grow a fair sized turtle. Just do not have the heart any more to kill a big snapper. I have no hesitation to take a soft shell, but I cannot get out and hunt them any more.

I was at a fellow's pond when I was in high school, fishing for bass from the shore line. Along came one of his big domestic ducks with a parade of little ones behind her. There were six little ones behind her when she started across the pond. A big snapper took them down, one by one, rear most first. She had one remaining little one when she reached the bank. Sure would have liked to have that one in the pot. He is probably still there eating ducks.
My friend Gary has 3 ponds and the snappers are trying to take them over, we kill them whenever they try and cross the 100yards of field between the landscaped pond and the two wild ponds. I've counted over 20 on the bank sunning themselves in the one big pond.
A good number of the waterways around here are loaded with them, we see a few red ear sliders but not many.
 

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WOW! Snappers in the wild are hard to find now, espe cially the big ones. I think most people don't fool with them any more, but the commercial fisherman certainly will. Pond raised snappers are another story. If I had pond turtles like that, I would keep the gumbo pot hot. Some of the very best meals I have ever eaten were when I was driving for Halliburton in Eunice, LA back in the 1960s. The drivers would rent a bar with a kitchen every other Saturday night or so and cook up a big gumbo orThe Sauce Picante. They used turtle when they could get it, but it was not often. Every cook in the kitchen (and there were many) added his own touch. I spent a lot of time in the kitchen drinking Dixie beer and watching the cooks. Not only a learning experience, but some of the very best times I have ever had.

Darn, if it doesn't bring tears to my eyes recalling those times. Never knew better people or had better friends.
 

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I've traveled around the world a bit, and I've eaten quite a few things, rattle snake and dove are two of my favorites. Squirrel is edible but not my first choice. Bull snake was tough, but it may have been how I cooked it. Gator is good if you get a big cut, but most of the time people cut the pieces too small and all you taste is the breading.

The one thing I avoid eating is Buzzard. My grandmother has always told me that they are poisonous. Something about all the toxins from the rotten meat they eat building up in their bodies.
 

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A friend roasted a got for nice cookout in Hondo, TX many yrs ago. Was great and

took a long time to cook. One of he fellows helping said "I believe that is cooking faster on the top than the bottom." It was a HOT sunny afternoon.
 

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I eat a lot of wild game. Fully believe a lot has to do with the prep. Wood chuck, AKA ground hog whistle pig is a prime example. they eat grasses mostly but so many for get or do not know to remove the glands under the arm pits.

I shutter every time I read of some one mixing pork with venison when grinding. Have heard all kinds of excuses why they do so. Most common is to hold a buger to gether to make a buger. So much crap.

Back when I was a kid heard many a person say they just did not like venison at all. I could under stand that. Back then the cars had big front fenders, what better place to tie a deer on for the trip back hiome from the northern woods hunting spot? a 3 hour trip on the interstate today was a 4 to 5 hour trip on the 2 lane roads then and that deer was getting cooked in its hide by engine heat.

I have seen hunters that will hang game from rabbits to squirrels with the inards in them and fur on in the hot sun all day.
Take the time to clean them before hanging and don't hang them in the sun.

Snapper is one of my favorite foods, these days I don't see many of eatting size and don't set traps for them.
 

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Born and bred Louisiana ...some say I'm Cajun , some say something else not so polite (just smile when you say it ...it's OK) !
Cajun's pretty much eat anything ... I realy like nutria , gator, frogs and shark and just about all wild meat including crawfish and such .
Possum and **** isn't bad if you know how to prep and cook it .
The only animal I've never eaten is Skunk ... I just give them a wide berth and not realy interested in catching , killing or skinning one... I would taste it if someone else cooks it but skunks can put up a stink that don't easy wash off .
Gary
 
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