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OUCH!
Bad habit(s) Illustrated by Those who do not study Game Season Schedules.
Poor Judgement and Bad manors shown by Low education "Shooters" leaving their 'Trash" where it dropped.
Unaware "Shooters" firing off Rounds WITHOUT Knowing What is/Was Downrange.
Sounds like A Lot More Education is Needed on ALL Sides of the Argument.
And Yes, I have been guilty of leaving ejected 22LR cases where they landed in my 'early Life Hunting days'.
Also in my "Time in Service" I usually left Ejected Brass where it fell in my 'combat area shooting', Too many "metal bees' around to 'police the brass' at the time.

Best Regards,
Chev. William
 

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Three times in 25 years I've heard of deaths by bullet of "co-re creationist". It very nearly happened to me in May of 1998.
My ex-business partner had come up from Colorado to shoot rock chucks and ground squirrels while the grass was green and short. For three days we'd shot an average of 500 rounds each and hitting better than 85%. Late in the afternoon, with an oblique sun, we were watching a pressure ridge of lava for yet another rockchuck of the recent 'hatch'. We'd shot maybe 300 in areas similar along a fire access road that cuts between north south running pavements 30 miles apart. The ground was BLM, with recovery from a fire keeping it from being grazed. The nearest road or access to our north was at least 12 miles of very rugged lava flows and desert bowls. We hadn't seen anybody all day.
I caught a glimpse of hair between rocks and brought the 20X Leupold to a gap to intercept the rockchuck that looked to be hopping along the ridge line rocks. There were more black lava rocks behind the target area about 300 further on and the reddish hue of a rockchuck is near unmistakable in the sunlight. I called attention to a possible shot to my partner and he said he'd just seen it in binoculars and told me about where to look. It came up again for an instant and we waited again. When it next came out, I could see something 'wrong' and got off target while my heart seemed to be completely stopped! It was a college kid 'out for a hike'.
He had heard us shooting and wondered what it was about, but never thought about his bare head looking like a rock chuck dodging behind rocks. The rifle was a 6mm wildcat and the range was in the near 100% area of its expertise. Had he stopped and looked away, could I have known it was a human head? I seriously doubt it and that's very scary.
Mountain bikes have totally changed S. Idaho's varmint shooting.
 
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Come to the UK and have fun dodging the local walking clubs and dog walkers on the maze of public footpaths that criss cross our countryside. Out crow shooting on Saturday and set up my hide in a hedgerow overlooking a field of perhaps 50 acres. I knew there was a footpath behind me on the other side of the hedge. After about 20 minutes I saw a flicker of movement at the far corner of the field and a man and his wife plus three siblings came walking across the centre of the field with two dogs on leads which they were entitled to do as a public right of way crossed there and legally the farmer had to leave a 1 meter strip through his crop for access. On our driven pheasant days we often have walkers stroll through the line of guns on similar paths. Essential to be aware at all times because not all of these people can read a map and some make a wrong turn although the paths are marked with arrows.
The only case I remember, of a member of the public getting shot at was when a 'nature lover' decided he would go out after dark with his new night vision binoculars. The local gamekeeper and a friend were also out lamping foxes and the glint from the night vision lenses looked like a foxes eyes .... now you should never shoot at just eyes ..but these two did and fortunately missed. Any of you who have had a bullet pass VERY close to your head will know, the effect is quite startling and can cause a loss of hearing for a few seconds. We know to make sure of our background here for sure.
 

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OUCH!
Bad habit(s) Illustrated by Those who do not study Game Season Schedules.
Poor Judgement and Bad manors shown by Low education "Shooters" leaving their 'Trash" where it dropped.
Unaware "Shooters" firing off Rounds WITHOUT Knowing What is/Was Downrange.
Sounds like A Lot More Education is Needed on ALL Sides of the Argument.
And Yes, I have been guilty of leaving ejected 22LR cases where they landed in my 'early Life Hunting days'.
Also in my "Time in Service" I usually left Ejected Brass where it fell in my 'combat area shooting', Too many "metal bees' around to 'police the brass' at the time.

Best Regards,
Chev. William
Good post. It's absolutely frightening to go to a public range in mid Missouri anymore. It wasn't always this way. I think many of us came from a time when our fathers and grandfathers taught us how to shoot and handle a gun correctly. Now a days, at the public ranges and even at times at the private ones, there are young and middle age folks shooting that you can tell never had any proper teaching. They almost always are shooting semi-autos. I call them IWAWs (Idiots With Automatic Weapons). They are f'ing clueless and dangerous in all too many cases. More than once I've had to chew someone's butt for shooting or preparing to shoot when someone else was down range checking/changing their target. These AR toting morons actually think it's OK to fire if the person down range is a few lanes over. I feel sorry for those folks who don't have access private land to shoot. It's a big problem. It's gotten bad in the last 10-15 years.
 

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As Jack Belk has so accurately and revealingly pointed out those areas of comfortably remote hunting may no longer be. I lived in Southern Idaho and hunted pheasant around Burley and rock chucks near the Snake River years ago and can totally identify with Belk's surprise and astonishment to see some kid scramble over the volcanic black rock in your scope's field. Nobody should be there without feathers or fur. I left the big West Country chasing jobs and money and landed in New Hampshire and Maine only to be totally dumb-struck by anti hunting groups In the woods deliberately walking out in front of hunters, slashing tires, breaking windows etc, etc, only to come home and see these same people pasted all over the news channels claiming they walked these woods every day and now gun shots riddled the very ground they traversed and returning alive was beyond even the most remote possibility for them. The state wildlife cops had no idea how to handle this.

BTW hunting them rock chucks is beyond difficult and I'm embarrassed to say four or five hunts brought me nothing but one or two birds and some really chewed up knees and dinged wood stocks. Tough tough country and even tougher prey. Shoot one and finding it ain't easy -- no place for dogs. Taking a drone
 

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I read that article this morning and just could not come up with the right way to post it here. The sad thing about it is that it is true and there is nothing to do about it but be a more responsible gun owner/shooter. In Jack's tale, there is no blame to be laid, but thanks to his acute sense of his surroundings, level headed thought process and an absolute acceptance of responsibility for his shooting practices, the young idiot survived. That young man had the same right to be there as Jack did, just not the same level of intelligence. Glad to hear that that issue didn't get any worse. I have been in these same situations before and they can absolutely ruin a great day of shooting. I don't sleep well knowing that I almost killed another human being because of their lack of common sense.

Allen
 

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Mountain bikes will let folks go where maybe they can get themselves in trouble, that's for sure.

Last year, while elk hunting along a trail (that was open to bikes), Marshall and I were plumb astonished to hear the racket of a half-dozen people come up on the trail we were cow-calling about 50 yards below. Spandex, little day packs that might have held a sandwich and maybe a couple of water bottles, and mountain bikes... granted, the trail was open and they had as much right to be there as we did. We were in full camo (bowhunting) and they never had a clue.

They reached the summit, maybe a quarter mile away, and you could hear them whooping and hollering. Then they went off the back side of the mountain toward another peak.

Assume they made it to wherever they were going. Did see their vehicle and it was gone the next day. One thing's for sure, a mountain bike sounds a lot different than an elk so they were in no danger from us.

I doubt they had any idea there were wolves, and possibly grizzly, in the area.
 

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All boils down to too many people. I think there is a plan afoot for that.
 

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We have our stupidity

I never took up turkey hunting mainly because the accepted way is to go into the woods and act like a turkey. I stay out of the woods during deer season. After thinking about it I gave up hunting squirrels with a rifle. I used to clean up waste water ponds and would flush ducks off thèm. So I buy my ducks in the store. I love rifles especially squirrel rifles and levers and bolt guns. I build my own sights, customize guns and punch paper with them. If I hunt it is with a scatter gun.
 
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