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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Some jobs are a labor of love because I believe in them 100%. When asked about the possibility of butter knife bolt handles on full stocked CZ rimfires, it piqued my interest for sure.
I am of the opinion that some CZ rifles are the future desirables much like the Win M52 Sporter and banner Mauser rimfire sporters are today.

I was sent two CZ bolts to (hopefully) make future classics more so. Some will point out that altering future classic collectables will cut their value. Maybe. It increases value to the present owner and he's paying the bills.

Here are pertinent pics of BEFORE--
1) My M452 showing the bolt handle angles slightly back in the stock notch.
2) The bolt handles are none too low when using (preferred) low rings. BUT, the bolt is shown all the way back.
3) At first, I thought the bolts were identical but this shows the difference. M455 is top M452 bottom.
4) Same shot showing bottom profile of new handles.
5) Before work starts.
6&7) CZ (BRNO) M21 bolt handle I bought from Bubba at a gunshow. I think they're the best of the butters. ;)
8) The M21 handle is full M98 size. New ones will be size appropriate.

The bar stock is 1040 ag equipment steel used for braces mostly. It's the flat equivalent of StressPruf. It will blue or color case harden just like 1018.

As we clearly see. The locking lugs on the CZ changed with the model number. The 452 has dual opposed lugs and the 455 uses only the root of the bolt handle as a locking lug, but its bigger.
Both units are heat-treated in the body and the bolt handle root, but the knobs are soft. (induction-hardened, I'm sure).
My intension is to weld the new handles below the serial numbers and proof. Good intensions and all that. We'll see how it comes out. The tricky part is to blend new with the old without affecting scope clearance. Both bolts fit in my M452, so they can be tested for clearance and appearance.

Progress update soon.

Edit-- I thought the 'other' bolt was a M457. It's not, it's a 455. Those with a 457 might want to compare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is the cocking cam built into the bolt handle in these guns?
Yes, the cocking cam and the extractor cam are part of the bolt handle unit. Rather than have to 're-heattreat', I'll protect the heat-treated part and TIG weld with cooling gaps. The blue on the bolt collar and bolt handle root shouldn't change.
 

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That brings up an interesting question. I have been using Brownells 3 1/2% Nickel rods forever, but lately they don't seem to be blending well when bluing the bolt handles. What rod are you using?

PTCSmith
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Twenty-five years ago, I was a traveling salesman for Rockmount Research and Alloys in Vancouver, WA. (1800 ARC-RODS for catalog) I guess that still applies. I was building the ACGG #9 rifle at the same time and sacrificed a 1903 Springfield (wrecked) action to experiment on TIG rods. The product I was selling was equal to and better than the others tried and I've been using it for all gunsmithing jobs since. TARTAN TIG is the rod. I use 1/16 and 3/32 but the smaller is the most useful to me.
It does well on Winchesters but I can't say it's perfect. I'm always looking for one that does better.
This is a Win 1903 .22Win Auto having holed filled. Dovetails were cut, gun engraved and blued. The screw holes can be seen but it helps to know where to look.

ACGG #9 was a government de-mill 1922 that was torch cut through the action between the bridges. The square bridge was added, bolt handle made and changed but the big job was shortening it by about 5/8 inch. Look close and you can see small pits that I chased for a week and finally let them stay. Springfields are leftover Re-bar metallurgically.

A 'kink' about blending nickel steels--- leave it longer in the tank and increase temp to no more than 305 and stir a lot getting there. It's easy to 'burn' your salts so I use a smaller tank to risk less of them. At these higher temps, you'll sometimes get a very dark red rust form on the part. That's great!! Card it off with 0000 de-greased steel wool and dip again for a few minutes. THAT is the toughest blue going and I feel the secret to the Dulite Mausers.
 

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Nice job and very nice explain. Sometimes, it seems, not everybody knows what they're paying for? It's either knowledge and experience or the stuff ya avoid stepping in. Obvious to me here, it's safe to go barefooted. 😎
Thanks, I'm following with great interest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
After considerable trouble getting a Chinese boy scout welder full of spider webs and dust to sparkle correctly, I got some welding done on one of these CZ bolts.

The new piece and the bolt stub are ground at a wide angle for welding. Notice the new piece is under the bolt stub. The weld is started on the new piece and bridged to the bolt, then the bolt collar and bolt stub and cooled (too hot to touch but not hot enough to sizzle in the bolt parts but the new handle is HOT.)
I turned a brass heat sink for the collar.
Filler metal is put in, then rough ground to find the pits and places that need metal.
It'll probably need more as I start shaping.
Watch out spiders, electricity on the way!

Notice the pink paste in one picture. That is Heat Stop paste, used by plumbers a lot. I used to sell the stuff to welding shops. The sales demo was scary...make a layer of the paste a quarter inch thick as big as your hand. With ox-act torch melt a penny in the palm of your hand. I sold a lot of after that demo. For the main stem welding, I packed the collar full and stuck it over the exposed parts. It worked well. No sizzle from the collar or lugs.
 

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A polished handle on that bolt will really set that off Jack. Can't wait to see the finished product!!
 
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I'm with JW, totally. A lot of work and it's awesome. Then there's the pictures, woof, outstanding. Thank You !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was going to finish one today until the fish started calling.

Pictures in order--
A little urging to bend is made possible by the Tanya Harding 5 lb. model.
Obviously some metal is missing on top to get the BRNO look.
So, I added some, but you see the pits left from my mistake. (Strike an arc with no gas does that)
Gone now.

We'll know tomorrow night how it looks polished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I got curious and the fish weren't hungry.
Still battling pits, but I'm winning.

Several have asked about the welding machine and process. It's a cheap Chinese copy of an inverter Tig, Arc, and plasma machine costing thousands. They saved money by having Cub Scouts solder together welder kits. Or at least thats what it looks like inside. It DOES work at times.
I run DC with a foot pedal amp control. I peg it at 200 amps once in a while getting started, but a 150amp machine is plenty.
Air cooled torch, 1/16 thoriated tungsten electrode ground to a long spear point by diamond. Filler rod is Rockmount Research and Alloys Tartan TIG&Gas. Pure Argon gas with the gauge about 7 and 12 second post flow.
As an aside---I bought some Nicholsen files from ebay made in Brazil. Seem a very good file so-far.

more and better pics tomorrow.
 

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Notice the pink paste in one picture. That is Heat Stop paste, used by plumbers a lot. I used to sell the stuff to welding shops. The sales demo was scary...make a layer of the paste a quarter inch thick as big as your hand. With ox-act torch melt a penny in the palm of your hand. I sold a lot of after that demo. For the main stem welding, I packed the collar full and stuck it over the exposed parts. It worked well. No sizzle from the collar or lugs.
No surprise you sold a lot, I'd be impressed if someone did the penny trick in front of me :oops:
 

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Super explain and great photo's Mr. Belk. It's enough to make a woman cry in joy, I just watched one do it. I got a little misty eyed myself over the beautiful workmanship. 😉
 

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I got curious and the fish weren't hungry.
Still battling pits, but I'm winning.

Several have asked about the welding machine and process. It's a cheap Chinese copy of an inverter Tig, Arc, and plasma machine costing thousands. They saved money by having Cub Scouts solder together welder kits. Or at least thats what it looks like inside. It DOES work at times.
I run DC with a foot pedal amp control. I peg it at 200 amps once in a while getting started, but a 150amp machine is plenty.
Air cooled torch, 1/16 thoriated tungsten electrode ground to a long spear point by diamond. Filler rod is Rockmount Research and Alloys Tartan TIG&Gas. Pure Argon gas with the gauge about 7 and 12 second post flow.
As an aside---I bought some Nicholsen files from ebay made in Brazil. Seem a very good file so-far.

more and better pics tomorrow.

my willys jeep engine turned stick welder can do that!!!!!!!

i don't have a picture of it, its in my shop. but i found one that is similar.

Wheel Vehicle Plant Automotive tire Motor vehicle
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
AH! The old Lincoln Tornado. Built like a tank and just as noisy. One of the best of the old machines.
 
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