Shooters Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Folks!

Well I got to get out on a sheep hunt after all. It was a great trip, and a quality hunting experience. I didn't see another person the whole time, and although I didn't see a lot of sheep, I did find this nice ram. The fall colors were beautiful, and being out in those Alaskan mountains in the fall was priceless. It was about a 12 mile packout, with about 130 pounds in two trips, so I felt I earned him! My video camera failed on me shortly after I filmed the ram, so I had to get this photo by taking a picture off the TV screen.

It would be great if other folks would post some of their photos of this year's or past years hunts.

bucktrack.
Alaska Hunting Adventure: 700 Miles Alone by Backpack and Raft
http://www.bucktrack.com/Alaska.html
 

Attachments

·
Beartooth Regular
Joined
·
5,218 Posts
Congratulations!!! Very nice ram.

Where were you hunting (not the exact location of course, just general vicinity or mountain range). Details, we need details!

Anyone hunting sheep without the use of spotter planes and putting all the miles in on their legs definitely deserves one. Glad you made it through the fire season in fine shape.

Great job!
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,987 Posts
Yes, that's a trophy to be proud of - especially the most complete full circle I've ever seen! A perfect circle.

The type of hunting conditions you describe are far in my past abilities. I envy you younger folk who can still put in a hunt like that. Congratulations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
bucktrack - Great looking ram. Congratulations on a fine payoff to your hard effort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks folks. I was on a week-long hunt in the central Brooks Range. I had seen a handful of ewes and lambs, but not a ram. I was walking along a creek to cross another divide when I spotted a couple of sheep that had just come into view up a steep rocky ravine. Through my binos I could see that they were a couple of rams, and the one was so much bigger I was pretty sure he’d be a nice ram. Through the spotting scope I could see he was a good ram. I picked out a couple of boulders to use as markers. After emptying most of my pack (I had my full camp) I took a couple game bags, ammo, a space blanket, some extra warm clothes, my knife, and my spotting scope. Climbing as fast as I could without getting too out of breath, I finally got to the two boulders, then side-hilled over to a rock outcropping. There they were! They had been feeding uphill. I estimated they were 200 yards away. I had a dead lean, and they were unalarmed. The wind was rather iffy, so I decided to take the shot. I must have yanked the trigger in the last millisecond, because I missed him clean the first shot AND the second! I suspect buck fever. The third shot I heard the bullet hit and he fell, rolling about 100 feet to some boulders where he stopped. The younger ram ran about 100 yards, then trotted away I reached his fallen partner. The third shot had been perfect. I guess the true yardage was about 250 yards, a reasonable shot for a good shooter with a dead lean and plenty of time, but plenty far if your heart is hammering away!

The next day I packed the meat over a glacier and to the top of the divide. The next after that, as I packed my camp out, I found where a lone wolf track followed mine from the day before, toward my meat stash. In the snow on the glacier, he was putting his feet in my tracks. I KNEW he was heading for my meat, and he was. Luckily, the space blanket covering the stash spooked him, and although you could see where he had looked at the cache, he didn’t dare get the meat.

All in all, a great experience. You sure can’t put a price on that kind of wilderness.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top