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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can you really damage the crown, rifling, or something in the chamber that easy with your cleaning rod. Why are there so many different type's ( where materials are concerned ) of bore guides, jags, and rods. Don't use a rod made of SS or Aluminum, and don't use anything but a 1 piece rod is what I have read so many times. Yet there are so many made out of these materials or 1 piece rods out there. Hoppe's is one of the biggest names in cleaning and they sell who knows how many 3 piece cleaning rods. I had a jag that didn't mate up well with a rod and I hope I didn't rough up the the rifling right at it's beginning in the chamber. Opinions please, thank you much !!
 

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Your average shooter with your average rifle with your average scope with average ammo will never be able to tell the difference. Even with a better everything it will be hard to tell if there is an increase or decrease in accuracy because of the cleaning rod.

But for the guy who wants to shoot itty-bitty groups or tiny critters at long distances, a better cleaning rod is just one of many things that can help. With cleaning rods, all those strokes add up, once in and once out, time after time after time. The count will be into the thousands relatively fast.

The rod damages in several ways, dragging across lands at the muzzle, the handle striking the muzzle and a snug rod humping up in the middle bouncing from land to land.

1-pc rods, coated rods, bore guides and muzzle guides all help to prevent the wear and tear. I'm really liking the new chemicals that are on the market now. The chemicals do all the work and the rod just hangs on the end of the bench till it's needed to push the crud out.
 

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I've based my rod selection and cleaning practices off of hearsay more than having ruined a bore with defective cleaning practices.
Neverless common sense tells me keeping the rod off the rifling is a good idea, as is one piece rods, cleaning from the breech end and using bore guides. I prefer jags to loops and all brass brushes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, truth be told, what I may have done was really just stupid on my part. The gun didn't need a heavy cleaning or anything and I do use 1 piece coated Tipton rods, I didn't use the bore guide like I normally do. It's hard to tell because I don't have a bore scope, I do have bore lights that I use. I guess I'll find out next time I shoot it, hopefully it'll be okay !:eek:
 

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IME, you'd need to have abused your bore for a long time before the damage would be noticeable. Damage would occur faster using a cleaning rod that was made of material harder than barrel steel. While a bore guide would help, just running your rod paralled to the bore starting at the chamber (if possible) and avoiding having the rod touch the bore at the crown helps. I tend to favor the liquid solvents when cleaning bores but at times it may be necessary to resort to paste cleaners which contain fine abrasives. Be sure to follow the instructions exactly with paste cleaners.
 

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I really doubt that one cleaning session would do significant damage to a bore or crown.
For a target or varmint shooter, who's shooting a lot, and maybe cleaning weekly, then bad cleaning procedure can add up to some damage.
We all have our preferred method and tools. The only thing I would add to that discussion is: get in the habit of wiping off your cleaning rod often. The grit that can get picked up on a cleaning rod can do damage- it's likely harder than the rod itself. I keep an old hand towel on my cleaning cradle, and wipe down the rod frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Jack, I do wipe the rod now. I was surprised the first time I wiped one and saw how much black stuff was on the towel afterwards. That's a good tip to pass along also, thank you sir !
 

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Bore Snake

I need to know this because I am anal about cleaning my firearms but, has anyone heard of damage to the bore caused by Hoppes Bore Snake? I use them for a fast cleaning from time to time.
 

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whip down rod

Jack, I do wipe the rod now. I was surprised the first time I wiped one and saw how much black stuff was on the towel afterwards. That's a good tip to pass along also, thank you sir !
I agree, I do the same thing and see black stuff on the rag. What is coming off the rod because the rod is not scraping the barrel.
 

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Around 3 years ago, the Garand Collectors Assoc. had an article in their quaterly magazine about a test they made on cleaning a M1 Garand bore using a G.I. issue 3 piece steel rod. Details of this article are hazy to me, but imagine they had a garand with a muzzle that measured a 2 on an armorers muzzle guage. They wanted to see how many strokes it took with a standard issue G.I. cleaning rod to change the muzzle guage reading from a 2 to a 3. Also, they deliberately ran the rod into the muzzle to contact the muzzle bore, changing the place the rod contacted the muzzle's bore....they attempted to get an even wear from rod.

Like I wrote, details are hazy, but they discontinued the experiment after several thousand strokes with the rod. They never got to a 3 on the guage. Why did they stop? Well, let's pretend a Garand had a bore life of 4,000 rounds fired. They had a forumula for how many rounds fired before it was cleaned and how many strokes a soldier made with a cleaning rod when cleaning.

Based on this formula, they realized, LOL, a bore would be shot out well before a soldier could change the measurement one increment on an armorer's muzzle guage by improperly running a G.I. issue 3 piece steel rod down his bore.
 

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fred, I've been using 3-piece aluminum cleaning rods for a long time, either from the muzzle end or the chamber end on bolt guns. On levers or single shots, from the muzzle only. Not all of these rods/threads lined up very well. I've never crapped out a crown on any rifle, but I have also been careful not to jam any handle into the crown. As has been pointed out, wipe the rod down before you use it to get rid of grit and oxidation.

I take the 3-piece jointed rods on field trips. I use one-piece SS or carbon fiber rods for cleaning at home.
 

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Pretty interesting. I don't doubt the validity of their experiments at all. But, I am at a loss as to how to explain the numerous Mausers and Mosins that I've seen with the bores worn nearly smooth. Must be a combination of factors at work? Maybe it depends on the powder/primer residue? Steel jacketed ammo? I don't know.
 

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Some of the wear and tear is from everyday dust, followed by shooting. I used to see a lot of wear at the muzzle prior to air conditioning. Rifles were left in gun racks in the back window and the trucks were driven daily with the drivers window down. Dust would settle in the muzzle then the rifle fired on a reoccurring basis. Muzzle down in the floorboards doesn't help either.
 

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I feel Lucas rod guides and Dewey one piece rods are a lot cheaper the cost of replacing a barrel. I have a Lucas guide that fits every rifle I have. I also have at least 1/2 dozen Dewey's one piece cleaning rods. When I can find them, I use Hoppe's Elite rods also, I've probably have another 1/2 dozen of those, they are only about $15 each and I have a couple handles for them. Understand, a lot of these are junk rods because once you push a tight patch and flex it, it usually sets a bow in it and it's junk after that.

If you don't think a rod can damage a barrel, then I guess those $7 kits from Wal-Mart will suit your needs.
 

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Back in the 70's I bought a lathe from Dave Corbin and we had several discussions about his products. One product he sold was a one piece stainless steel cleaning rod. He thought that the coated or soft aluminum was a poor choice. They could get derbies stuck in the coating or the soft aluminum. Eventually you will have an abrasive cleaning rod. He felt a fairly hard stainless steel was the best material for a cleaning rod. The hardness of the rod prevented debris from adhering to the cleaning rod.

The hardness of the stainless steel rod is less than the rifle barrel and would not damage the barrel. If you are concerned about the crown, use a guide. To me the worse type of cleaning rod is those that are coated with a soft plastic. These will diffidently pick up derbies that in-beds into the plastic.

Frank
 

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Oh, come now fellows; If the lowest-priced cleaning tools didn't have even a theoretical, hypothetical, ridiculously-improbable potential to hurt something, how would anyone sell any of the more-expensive cleaning tools?
;)
 

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I look at it this way, when just about every barrel maker and top bench rest shooters on the planet recommends a good rod guide and one piece rod, because they've seen more barrels ruined from cleaning than shooting, I will take their word. I'll depend on what the experts say over some personal opinion on the internet.
 

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Sounds like a good philosophy. Can't 'ruin' a barrel with a Bore Snake and some CLP, so that's what I use, if I ever use anything!
:p
 

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Nylon coated cleaning rods, is the way to go. Draging a bronze brush back from the muzzle end will show wear on the crown over time.
 

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Oh, come now fellows; If the lowest-priced cleaning tools didn't have even a theoretical, hypothetical, ridiculously-improbable potential to hurt something, how would anyone sell any of the more-expensive cleaning tools?
;)
They're more convenient on a field trip?:)
 
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