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Any thing wrong with depriming ( universal depriming die ) prior to tumbling brass, beyond an extra step ?

The only thing I could think of would be the possibility of having media stuck in the flash hole

Lj
 

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You might get media in the flash hole, unless you have really fine media, but there is nothing wrong with it.

I typically tumble everything that comes from the range to get any junk off of it, especially if it was picked up out of the dirt or mud. Pistol cases I then size and load. Rifle cases get sized/deprimed, then dropped in the tumbler again to clean off all sizing lube. I then check the flash holes while sizing, or before priming to check for any left over media.
 

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I always deprime before cleaning. I don't have a tumbler (don't want one) but I give the brass a hot soapy bath and a hot rinse in 50/50 white vinegar and water. The vinegar does a decent job of cleaning the inside of the case and I will most likely add an ultrasconic cleaner to the loading room. During processing they get hit with 0000 steel wool and shine like new money.
 

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first off I want to say I am new to reloading and have only used my tumbler once (deprimed first) with excelent results, except the corn cobb media would stick in the flash hole but a poke with a needle got it right out.
 

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I always decap primers prior to tumbling so that the primer pockets get some (not much) cleaning. A poke with a round toothpick gets rid of any media left in the flash hole. The other option is to decap with media left in the flash hole. This results in bits of media dropping all around my press and possibly into the press itself.
 

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I resize/decap first, but that is largely because I want to clean the cases AFTER sizing, to get the case lube off and avoid any chance of contaminating the new primers as I handle the cases. Clearing any media from the flash holes doesn't take long and is worth it, to me. The process I use is to twirl one of those little Lyman primer pocket cleaners as I pull the case from the tumbler, which almost always clears the flash hole. This is also when I check the pocket/flash hole to ensure it's ready for a new primer.
 

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I find myself tumbling less and less as the years go by; shiny doesn't make them shoot any better, I find, LOL! But I learned long ago that walnut is much less likely to stick in the flash holes. I don't know WHY, but it doesn't. I glued a short piece of heavy paperclip wire into a small dowel to poke out any that does. I glance at the pocket before I prime to check.
 

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"You'r heads on right" littlejoe. No harm at all doing it that way. Other members have told you of the "price" that you must "pay" for doing so though!

Make sure that the flash-hole is clear prior to priming the case is all!

Cheezywan
 

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I had an epithany the other night while prepping some brass . I deprime first , then tumble and poke the media out of the flash holes with an allen wrench . I thought it would be nice to use a screwdriver for the job . A No. 7 Torx bit in a bit holding screwdriver is the ticket , much easier on the hand !
 

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i've got a comment that is slightly off topic but i think would fit nicely into this discussion:

a while back someone commented in one of my threads that they don't bother with deburring the flash holes in their once fired cases... well since i've got the tool, and like to be thorough, i do. i use winchester cases, and lots of times, the tool trims very little, if any.

however, more often than you would think, i will find a case with burrs so large they partially cover the flashhole. just the other night, i found a case with a flash hole so rough, my case length gauge for my trimmer wouldn't fit through. this would no doubt affect ignition and accuracy... so to those that don't, i would suggest looking into it if you like the utmost consistency (as i do)
 

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I used deprime my brass before tumbling most of the time. I used an air hose with the pressure set low to blow the media out of the primer pocket. I have found that if I don't deprime before tumbling, the decaping pin will clean any media left in the primer pocket for you. Saves me a step.
 

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While most of my brass is either off the floor at the indoor range, or has been purchased cleaned, I occassionally get fairly dirty brass in the bag. It can be quite cruddy if it's the stuff throw in my bag when at the matches. So...that's my first step with all my salvaged brass--it goes into the tumbler shortly after I get home, then deprimed/sized next.

I put about 1,000 rds through the vibratory tumbler that I'd decapped/sized already, and had a LOT of media stuck in the primer pockets. I found this to be a real time consumer. Since I have not found any media that actually cleans the primer pockets (and I've left the cases in the tumbler for DAYS), I decided to tumble, then decap. Clean, shiny cases going into the sizing die, although of course the have rouge on them so there's some added die wear but I believe it's negligible.

If the ultrasonic cleaners actually work and truly clean primer pockets, then obviously I'd decap first. As it is, I doubt I'll ever clean a primer pocket again unless I get into precision rifle or something.
 

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Like Jodum, I decap first...with a universal decapper. Then tumble and use an air hose to clean the media out and any dust that is left in there (yes, there is a little dust from the tumbling process).
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Like Jodum, I decap first...with a universal decapper. Then tumble and use an air hose to clean the media out and any dust that is left in there (yes, there is a little dust from the tumbling process).
Stretch, add a cheap dryer sheet to your tumbler each time. It will attract most of the dust and hold it. Just throw it away each time. Helps keep the dust down.
 

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Stretch, add a cheap dryer sheet to your tumbler each time. It will attract most of the dust and hold it. Just throw it away each time. Helps keep the dust down.
Thats a great idea. I am going to try that the next time I tumble.

I am one that tumbles fired brass and then deprime after the tumbling process. Scotty
 

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Make sure you use a used dryer sheet....and even then, a little "film" (some type of oily substance from the sheet) will begin to permeate the tumbling media. With a new one, it's unbeearable.
 

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Although I had a Thumbler's Model AR1, I didn't worry much about tumbling for the many years that I only loaded for revolvers and bolt action guns. My brass rarely touched the ground, and was easy to just wipe-off before it got near my sizing dies. I used an RCBS hand brush to get crud out of primer pockets.

But, then I started shooting auto-loading pistols, and my brass started getting really gritty on the ground. In action shooting matches, much of it was stepped on before I got it back, and there was mud inside and out. Also, auto-loaders are a lot more finicky about ammo and can get worn a lot more by grit. SO, I began looking for a better approach to cleaning brass before getting it near my dies.

What I finally came down to was this: I deprime everything with a Lee universal decapping die in a cheap Lee "C" type press that is used for nothing else. Then I throw the deprimed brass into a rotary tumbler with stainless steel pin media with water and a little soap. When it comes out of the tumbler, it is COMPLETELY clean outside, inside and in the primer pockets. It is also reasonably shiny, so I don't feel a NEED to tumble in anything else. If I want to make it pretty, I can use Vinegar to remove any stains (with a baking soda after-rinse to prevent later tarnishing), and/or tumble dry in walnut or corn cob for a real polish. But, mostly I just reload the wet-tumbled cases as-is.

This has been super-efficient for me, compared to anything else that controls the crud anywhere near as well. The range dirt, powder residue and primer residue all stop at the universal decapping die/press, and my single-stage and progresive presses stay CLEAN. Even my dry tumbling media stays clean. The crud that comes off in the wet tumbling goes down my drain as black water, rather than getting spread around my shop as dust.

Because I have enough cases, I can come back from the range and start one set in the cleaning process while loading another set that is already primed, then relax and prime a third set while watching TV with the "better-half." So, there is always brass ready to go in whatever step I feel like doing, without waiting for something to dry or get out of the tumbler.

SL1
 

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Hey good idea on the dryer sheet, I will try that. The walnut media leaves very little dust, if kept fresh. I always deprime before cleaning. Afterwards, put 20 cases in a plastic ammo holder like Remington comes in. Then take my pocket cleaning brush and use a hand drill to clean primer pockets. Next use DRY air from the compressor to blow out all residue. Really speeds things up doing 20 at a time.
 
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