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Discussion Starter #1
Almost 90% of primers used by now was CCI. This autumn I loaded some XTP240 with H110 counting on CCI 350 primers. Everything fine till just few shots later when the first misfire happened on the shooting range while testing the load. No big problem I thought, from thousands of primers one to fail I said maybe it's not big problem. Then few weeks later I went on the range again with some rest from the seria I loaded previously and it happened again!!! That started the alarm!

I wrote a mail to CCI and they tried to find the fault in sitting of the primers, in my 629 in the cases etc. I followed their instructions, resitted the primers checked my revolver and so on, now hoping everything should be OK.

I hunt euroasian wild boar with my Plotts and I really hardly wait a chance to shoot a good trophy with my 629. By all ods it happened that day, after some hard job I got a chance to shoot at one... CLICK nothing happens!!! S...t I pulled the trigger again at the next one but it's not so big, it fall down but with a Federal factory cartridge I had in the next chamber.

This is to much! I wrote to CCI again when I got network explaining what happened. And expressing my disappointment. I sent all the pictures from fired and misfired cartridges, offered them to come and check them and finally to express their concerns about what happens. Nothing from that!

I bought some quantities from those primers but they are trash for me now. Problem is nowhere near my town I can find some Federal primers now and the hunting season is going on fast!

Please tell me if you had similar experience with CCI primers? What would you suggest?
 

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I've used CCI primers for more years than I can remember. I've purchased them in quantities of over 40,000 at a time and I can't recall ever having a problem with them. They're as good as any I've ever used. That being said, it's possible to get a bad lot of anything. However, I think I'd be looking at your handgun and not the primers. If you've adjusted the hammer spring or had a trigger job done on the gun I'd look there first. You simply may not be striking the primer hard enough or not seating them deep enough. I'd place the primers themselves at the bottom of those potential causes.
P.S. - welcome to the forum. Hope others can offer some other insights. Stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My experience was the same for almost ten years till this lot of 350.

My S&W 629 is a factory standard and it shoots excellent all other rounds except this lot of loaded round. I shot almost a box of CCI 240 grains with aluminium cases (laying arround few years) today with no problem. Also Federal, PPU and Magtech.
 

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Compare the firing pin dent in the cases that don't fire. If the firing pin strike is light, there won't be much of a dent in the primer. If it is light, like NSB suggested, check the tension screw on the main spring, it should be turned all the way in. Just a suggestion.

Allen
 

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Just this past summer I had the exact same failure in about ten percent of the primers from 200 I loaded. The rest of the box got shelved and I switched to Winchesters for my hunting season ammunition builds.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Sorry to hear about your troubles. I'm guessing you don't have many choices in your country. RWS or Norma, maybe?

Be sure to check that the primers are seated a few thousandths of an inch below the case head (or about 0.01 millimeters if your equipment is metric) and the firing pin goes out about 0.060" from the face of the breech (about 1.5 millimeters if I did the conversion right).

Federal primers have a reputation for being a bit 'softer' and more tolerant of a light primer strike by the hammer. That could be one explanation of the problem.

Again, good luck.
 

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I think you have either a striker energy or a striker velocity problem. To properly determine the amount of energy your firearm has you will need to do a copper energy test but the equipment is expensive and the coppers are very hard to find and expensive as well.

What I have done is to remove the mainspring on weapons and see if they are shorter than a new striker spring when tension is removed from . I have stretched striker springs and achieved more striker energy but this has proved to be a short term fix as they take a set again after a while.

If stretching striker spring helps I suggest replacing the striker spring with a new one giving more energy.

Be assured this condition is not restricted to any brand of firearm. One of the first things I learned when I went to the Army Small Cal Lab was every manufacturer in the industry including the gov't has received springs that took a set.

A spring engineer once told me a properly made spring will never take a set and there was no way to tell unless you had a way to check the energy with coppers.



These are copper holders for 30.06, 308 and 5.56.



This is a copper inserted into a copper holder which is placed in the firearm, point muzzle down and trigger is pulled causing the striker to impact the copper.





This is a bench inspection gage for measuring the depth of the indent that has been zeroed out prior to depth measurement. Note the point of the indicator is to the left of the indent to be measured.



Note this measurement shows about .0185"difference between the surface of the copper and the bottom of the indent. Note the point of the indicator is now in the indent and moved to determine the absolute bottom of the indent.

Some manufacturers accept .016" indent as acceptable. Others want .020" indent as min acceptable in center fire rifles. I have measured rifles with .022" indent (Swiss M1911 straight pull) and a .024" indent on a surplus LaCorona Mauser 98.



On long range rifles you will see vertical dispersion at long range before you get misfires. Primers engineers tell me the distance from all fire indent to all no fire indent is only .003"

Hopefully a moderator can reduce the size of these pics as I have no idea how to do so. sorry about the sizes.

I just remembered another possible problem. Are you shooting in cold weather? The lube inside your striker channel may well thicken and retard your firing pin velocity which will give erratic ignition.

I also have had blanked primers wherein a hole appeared in a primer the piece that came out went into the striker opening on the bolt face and reduced the inside diameter of the striker channel. It served as a brake on the striker in following rounds. I have had that happen twice in last 30 years. I degreased the bolt body and removed all signs of grease from the inside and the piece of the primer came out both times.
 

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I've reloaded the .44 Magnum for probably close to 20+ years how, using nothing but CCI LP Primers. I've never had a round fail to ignite. These loads were shot from a Super Redhawk and Super Blackhawk.

To tell you the truth, in 25+ years of reloading, which includes numerous rifle and handgun calibers, I've never had a CCI primer related issue.
 

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Welcome ,and comiserations ,I had winchester primer misfires in my win 94 and started a thread about it ,it was a very interesting thread.
 
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