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Most American made guns are designed to have parts removed "From Left, To Right", this includes many pins and sights. In lieu of extra pins or screws, some sight dovetails have a slight taper to keep parts tight.

If the sight was removed in the wrong direction, and there was a taper, then the taper is probably gone.
 

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On my Marlins, it's left to right like Mainspring said. I have confidence he's right concerning other American-made firearms too. Going the other way tightens it.
 

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Lukai,

Moving the front sight will change your point of impact laterally. Normally, one moves the rear sight in the direction you want to change the POI. It is OPPOSITE for front sight movement. I often move the front sights on my military rifles withoiut windage adjustable rear sights. After yoiu get your desired POI, I suggest you stake the front sight with a punch.

The other posters correctly stated you move the front sight in the dovetail Left to Right to remove and install in reverse order.

Webley
 

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I suggest you obtain a Williams Sight-pusher to remove/replace your front sight. Just banging it with a hammer & rod might damage your front sight.
They make special punches for doing this. I've changed a lot of them and never damaged any. If you use a steel punch you'll likely cause damage. The special one comes with a brass tip and a nylon tip. They're cheap, something like eight or nine bucks from Brownells.
 

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I have a ruger 10/22 and i got a new front sight.
I was wondering do i have to tap the front sight out of the dovetail a certain direction?
or does it not matter?
I'm already outvoted here but logic tells me that removing a front sight blade can be done in either direction.

If the dovetail in the sight blade is tapered, it means it should be driven into its slot tapered end first. Of course I'm assuming that the slot is cut parallel. Since I'm neither a gunsmith nor the sharpest tool in the shed help me out.

Since the OP has a new sight blade, I'd suggest he measure both ends of the dovetail and confirm whether it's tapered or parallel. My guess is that it's probably cut with a slight taper. That's the way I'd approach the problem.

Yes, some pins are tapered and care must be take to ensure the pin is driven out/in in the correct direction.
 

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To answer this question and remove all doubt: The slot in the barrel is cut tapered. It has been my experience (over 40 years of doing this) that all manufacturers seem to do it the same way...as you are looking down the gun to sight it, the sight should be removed from left to right and installed from right to left. The sight itself is not tapered. It's a "crush fit". If you do screw it up, all is not lost. You'll have to "punch" the base of the slot and use some RED LOCTITE when you re-install it. I've never lost one after doing that and it's still pretty easy to remove.
 

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. . .
MK logic has little to do with a lot of things, gunsmithing included :)
So I'm beginning to see:D

Have only two experiences in moving dovetailed sights: Both were rear sights. One on a SIG P220, the other on a Winchester 92 clone.

Both sights were driven a bit right to left with a brass punch.

Will not dispute that a front sight dovetail slot may be cut tapered but what happens when the sight dovetail has completely filled the slot and you want to still move it further in the narrow direction? I suppose that is an opportunity to show your expertise with a file.:)
 

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The sight base is tapered so the sight will tighten as it is pushed ferther in, if the owner needs to move it further it'll still be tight. if you push it all the way through you'll have to stake it in place with a staking punch and it'll stay put, but look like a rookie worked on it. This is one of the first things told to us at the Trinidad State Jr. College, Gunsmithing program when I was there. There are other ways to get around having to stake a loose doveailed sight base, but no need to go in to that if you are not going to practice the golden rule, of right in and left out on both pins and dovetails, you can figure it out for your self. Oh and by they way look out for the rotary dovetails, mess one of those up, and the only fix is ugly.
 
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