Shooters Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to shoot a lot of wax loads in the garage... Had a blast. After several hundred rounds, my Ruger security six developed an occasional problem cycling the cylinder. Was it the wax loads that caused the problem, or was that a coincidence? Will shooting wax loads harm a revolver in any way? I'm thinking about loading some wax loads to shoot with my kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,312 Posts
Keep in mind that primer residue contains some nasty stuff. It is usually greatly diluted and blown out by the powder charge. But when there IS no powder charge, that nastiness accumulates unchecked. The bore may or may not be fairly well protected by the wax - but the action isn't!

Clean guns well when fired with primers only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
I think Rocky has hit the nail square. Wax bulleted ammo is harmless, but you will get wax and primer residues that can tie things up -- really, worse than you would with regular ammo.

It's no reason to avoid having fun, though! Get a can of Gunscrubber and spritz everything off after each session.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,015 Posts
questions!

That sounds like fun when it's 19 degrees with 20mph winds outside like it is here right now. :) Where do you get the wax bullets or how do you make them??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,312 Posts
Pour melted wax into a shallow pan until it is about 1/2 deep. Allow to harden.

To "load" cartridges, simply press UNprimed cases straight into the wax all the way to the pan. THEN prime. (the flashhole lets the air out of the case when you seat the bullet.)

If standard primers aren't enough, try magnums. If they aren't enough to always launch the wax clear of the bore, drill the flashhole a wee bit larger. But if you enlarge the flashhole, never use those cases for anything except wax loads.

Like all loads, these can injure or worse. Follow ALL gun safety rules.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I always loaded for .38 spl or .357 mag... never had any trouble at all with the wax "bullets" clearing the barrel. Propelled only by the blast of the primer (no powder charge), they will put an impressive dent in a coffee can at 10 feet. And "a good friend of mine" said that they will put a painful black bruise on the top of the foot if you test their power that way. "He" recommends not to do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
I will say ALWAYS drill out the primer hole larger, and NEVER use your wax-load cases for regular loads. Keep them separate from your regular brass.

Why drill out the primer hole? When a regular round is fired, the primer actually backs out of the case a goood bit, but the recoil slams the cartridge backwards and instantaneously re-seats the primer against the breechface. Without the pressure of a regular load, the primers wax-bullet loads tend to back out and tie up the gun because they do not get driven back in to the case. Enlarging the hole reduces or eliminates the primer back-out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Primer setback or gunk getting behind the extractor will easily tie up a DA cylinder. I've had the same problem, but those wax bullets ARE fun!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
If you cast your own bullets, use one of your bullet moulds, and a hot glue gun. Put a little cooking oil in the cavities then fill with hot glue. Don't close the sprue plate, just cut the top off with a knife. Put a little oil on the bullet and shove it as far down in the case as you can.Yes it leaves lots a black residue in the barrel. But it cleans up easy. If your shooting a .45 caliber the glue sticks should fit right in the case.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
637 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Gents, Thank you, I just had alot of fun with both wax and the Speer plastic bullets. I felt like a young boy with his first Red Ryder! I learned buying the Speer target case was much easier than drilling and keeping sorted brass cases.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top