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I just tumble my brass for 2 hours in a Harbor Freight tumbler with Lizard Litter (crushed walnut) and a squirt of Turtle Wax liquid car polish. They come out shinny as new brass inside and out and ready to reload. I don't get the need to tumble them with stainless steel pins in water with all that mess.

New unfired .357mag brass:



Twice fired and tumbled .357mag brass:



What's the difference?
 

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I went 60 years without any case cleaner, so going without the latest whiz bang is easy. I use a cheap gunshow-bought vibrator now and it works well.
 
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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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My practice for years is the dry media mix of ground corn cob/crushed walnut hulls with a dab of case cleaner/polish dropped in. The wet process sounds like a lot of extra work to me.
 

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Vibrated for years, never was happy with how clean the insides and the primer pockets came out. Now, all I use it for is moly coating bullets.

I went to stainless steel tumbler, with all the extras.

It's real easy to nay-say a tool, one has never used,... but, it's not very authoritative, imo!

YOU COULDN'T PAY ME ENOUGH TO GO BACK TO A VIBRATOR !!!
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Shooter 444 - get your hearing aid adjusted - didn't "nay-say" the wet process, just that it sounds like a lot more work than I want to do.
 

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Wet tumbling may/may not be more work or effort depending on your point of view. I've done both ways, and prefer the wet tumbling due to the lack of dust, etc.. I use the dry method on occasion but still prefer the wet method.
 

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I just tumble my brass for 2 hours in a Harbor Freight tumbler with Lizard Litter (crushed walnut) and a squirt of Turtle Wax liquid car polish. They come out shinny as new brass inside and out and ready to reload. I don't get the need to tumble them with stainless steel pins in water with all that mess.

New unfired .357mag brass:



Twice fired and tumbled .357mag brass:



What's the difference?
The difference is that regardless of which method you use, clean has absolutely nothing to do with being bright and shiny. At best, that is a convenience to help find your brass on the ground, and at worst just stroking your ego. Bright and shiny doesn't make it perform on whit better. It can still be clean in so far as functional requirements go, but discoloring and stains don't make it shoot better or worse in any way.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Not sure I even know what decade I last used a tumbler to clean brass..... ;)
 

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Wet tumbling may/may not be more work or effort depending on your point of view.
Well, my point of view is it is far LESS work.

I can do it inside and it is much faster. Heck two hours with pins, Dawn, water and lemon juice and the brass looks better than new with clean primer pockets. No dust, and the inconsistent results with dry tumbling.

Dump the brass into a colander to separate the pins, rinse and into a pan with a towel and onto the wood stove to dry.

And pins are a lifetime investment. No dry media to have to eventually change when it gets too dirty.

My vibratory tumbler burnt up about five years ago and that is when I made the switch and would NEVER go back.
 

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Shooter 444 - get your hearing aid adjusted - didn't "nay-say" the wet process, just that it sounds like a lot more work than I want to do.

Hmmm,... really? Maybe you should get your reading comprehension adjusted!
My post was not written with you in mind,... sorry if that disappoints. 😢
 

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The difference is that regardless of which method you use, clean has absolutely nothing to do with being bright and shiny. At best, that is a convenience to help find your brass on the ground, and at worst just stroking your ego. Bright and shiny doesn't make it perform on whit better. It can still be clean in so far as functional requirements go, but discoloring and stains don't make it shoot better or worse in any way.

Well, this may ONLY be MY personal experience, but, necks without any foreign matter, being residue, or, stain, seems to be a more consistent component for me to work with, and therefore better for my results. Also, bright and shiny definitely results in FAR LESS RESIZING LUBE needed, and sometimes NO LUBE AT ALL! I am sure most know about the positive's of an extremely clean primer pocket.

p.s.,... my cases never touch the ground!

Which all brings me to the question,... if I may,... have you ever used this method?
 

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I have never used the vibrator tumblers, being as I started with a ultrasonic. Last year I got a harbor freight rock tumbler and steel pins. My cases turn out great with dawn and hot water. I have found that hot water works better than cold. About 2 hours and my brass comes out clean inside and out with clean primer pockets, as long as you don’t over fill the drums. Then I anneal most everything and set it out to dry.
 

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Well, my point of view is it is far LESS work.

I can do it inside and it is much faster. Heck two hours with pins, Dawn, water and lemon juice and the brass looks better than new with clean primer pockets. No dust, and the inconsistent results with dry tumbling.

Dump the brass into a colander to separate the pins, rinse and into a pan with a towel and onto the wood stove to dry.

And pins are a lifetime investment. No dry media to have to eventually change when it gets too dirty.

My vibratory tumbler burnt up about five years ago and that is when I made the switch and would NEVER go back.

HiDesertHunter, every once in awhile, when I decide to do something, I actually do it up right!

When I went with the SS pin method, I bought the Frankfurt tumbler, their pin and case separator, and best of all, their magnet. I put a few teaspoons of LEMSHINE, with a cap, or, two, of car wax and shine concentrate in the tumbler with enough HOT water to, just come above all the cases.

After a couple of hours of tumbling, I just dump the load into the case/pin separator, give it a few spins in both directions, dump the cases into a food drying screen hanging from the ceiling in my reload room, take the magnet and remove every little SS pin in the blackened wash water directly on to a heavy towel, on the bench without getting my hands, or, anything else, wet,... then dump the wash water,... come back the next morning and all the cases and pins, are dry.

I highly recommend Frankfurt's case/pin separator, and, at the very least, the magnet. The magnet is a real time saver!!!

For me, those accessories make dealing with the task far more easy than what I use to go through with walnut/corncob.
 

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I just tumble my brass for 2 hours in a Harbor Freight tumbler with Lizard Litter (crushed walnut) and a squirt of Turtle Wax liquid car polish. They come out shinny as new brass inside and out and ready to reload. I don't get the need to tumble them with stainless steel pins in water with all that mess.

What's the difference?
CoSteve,... if you tried it, you would understand the need, and the difference,... believe me.
 

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The Shadow
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p.s.,... my cases never touch the ground!

Which all brings me to the question,... if I may,... have you ever used this method?
My cases do hit the ground, everytime I go shooting. I have used both methods, but like MikeG; I almost never use either outside of testing.

Wet or dry cleaning, makes things pretty. If "daddy like shiney", then I'd expect them to use one method or another.
If someone is simply concerned with some potential accuracy loss due to fouling, they need to stop believing everything that gets printed in the inquirer.
If someone is concerned about the abrasive fouling causing undue wear, they need to reevaluate their fears.
90% of "shooters" will never wear out a barrel in their lifetime(excepting RJ using a 7mmLapua at a dogtown, or someone doing mag dumps). Those of us who do wear out barrels, aren't crying about the cost of a $400 rifle barrel, relative to the cost spent to cause that barrel to wear out.

Painless is a perfect example. I'm above 5,000 rounds fired through that POS Salvage 308. Yes, it is becoming difficult to keep bullets within a 55-gal drum lid at a mile with it. No, it's nowhere near unusable as a deer rifle, for at least the rest of my children's lifetimes.
I can honestly say, that rifle has had less than 400 rounds of clean brass run through it; in it's entire life.

Cheers
 
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Everybody knows a newly waxed car runs better! Nobody has a fast, dirty boat. ;)

There's a difference in 'needed' and 'nice'. My '99 Ford was washed when new and spent every day since on dirt roads without more than a good rain to wash it.
I've known guys that wore the barrels out of a rifle without ever cleaning anything but primer pockets and neck innards. I've got a varmint rifle now that's never had a clean case shot in it, but they were sized with Moly Di when they were made and never tumbled.
BUT, last year I bought a vibrator and already had over a hundred pounds of media so cleaned a 3 gal bucket of K-Hornet brass, some of it 40 years old. They look GOOD!
 

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There definitely is more than one way to skin a cat. Whatever works for you is your own business and not mine or anyone’s to disparage.
Well said!
...............................

Last comment, relating to the OP's subject,... it read (to me) as if the original question was comparing the need for a wet system as compared to dry. Since the OP is already on the road seeking cleaner brass, with his dry system, those who use the wet system just wanted to answer his question as to how the wet system compares, as to cleaning better.

Why others have a hitch in their giddy-up about wet/cleaner brass is obviously above my pay grade. But, not cleaning brass doesn't seem to be the actual subject here. And, obviously, the OP is concerned with his need of, how clean his brass is, or, he wouldn't be using the dry system, or asking for a comparison between the two with his post.

So, with that said, I can simply offer him what I know for a fact, from first hand experience,... if your need of a CLEANER CASE is truly your goal, Costeve,... wet is the way!
 
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