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John Kort,

Intersting,

Check with your library to see if they can obtain a copy of Dr. Hudsons: "Modern Rifles Shooying From the American Standpoint" This book is No. 1 in the Laflin and Rand shooting series books. It was published in 1903 by George Wolf of Wilmington Delaware.

Pg 101 gives tips for using Sharpshooter with lead bullets in reduced loads.
Pg. 137 gives Dr. Hudsons best lubricant formulae: 1 pd. Japan wax, 1/2 pd. mutton tallow, 1/2 pd. vaseline.

Pg. 32 gives information on using hacksaw blades to remove the two stage pull from Krag rifles.
E.C. Crossman dedicated his book: Military and Sporting Rifle Shooting to Dr. Hudson and mention adjusting his triggers per Dr. Hudsons instructions.

Jim Foral sure does write some interesting stuff... His article "My .30-40 Plinker was sure interesting. His book "Gun Writers of Yesteryear" is very interesting. I wish he would do another of these.

I was looking at Dr. Hudsons book this weekend. Its 99 years old, the binding is tight and the pages are top quality paper, not affected by age, not many of todays books will look so nice in 99 years! This book is pre-gas check.
 

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Dr. Walter Hudson is one of my favorite personalities in the history of rifledom. I have been particularly enthusiastic about following his progress in the area of the competition Krag, from 1901-1907. At the time, he was about the best there was. And simultaneously, he was one of the best, if not the best Schuetzen riflemen in the US. He fired on two Palma teams, and came in second in the Wimbledon Cup Match on at least two occasions. Lesser known are his contributions in regards to ammunition for precision riflery.
I have his book. Cost me three figures about five years ago. One of the reasons I bought this copy (apart from the fact that it was available) was the previous owner - E.C. Crossman, whose stamp and library sticker are on the inside covers. Qite a nostalgic artifact.
Hudson evidently had some determination not to allow is photograph to be taken,and it seems he went out of his way to avoid it. There is, however, one in his book. He is the errie loking dude, back row, in the Palma Team photo 1902.
 

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Kragman,

I enjoy reading about Dr. Hudson also. Along with all the shooters of the turn of the century - you know which century!
Gerald O. Kelvers books have some interesting information scattered around in them on Dr, Hudson.
I enjoy reading E.C. Crossman also. What luck to find his copy of dr. Hudsons book. You need a copy of Military and Sporting Rifle Shooting to go along with it, if just for the dedication to Dr. Hudson.
I enjoy Dr. Manns work and find his book interesting but slow reading. I guess thats why I likes Jim Forals book, Gun Writers of Yesteryear, it has some very interesting reprinted articles from that era.
Paul Estey, Charles Landis, T. whelen etc left an interesting written record of the transitional era that is overlooked by most shooters.
Fremmantle and Greener both fit right in there too.
 

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I wish Jim Foral could have included Dr. Hudson in his book. Hudson was one of the lesser-known,but very important gunwriters of his era. During 1901-1910, he wrote very capably about bullets for the Krag, mostly. I have one 1905 article by him detailing the development of his Schuetzen bullets 319289 and 319273 for the .32-40 as well as the .38-55 counterpart 375272. Mostly he wrote about his involvements with the Krag bullets, both cast and jacketed. It was, in the main, through his efforts that bullet to bore fit was pinpointed as being crucial to accurate shooting, and this had to go hand in hand with bullets properly fitting the throat. It was Hudson that educated the unsophisticated masses, and the steps were taken to a higher level of understanding that a rifle went bang, and when the target was missed, it was not always shooter error.
I have some of his stuff from OUTDOOR LIFE, OUTERS BOOK, and ARMS AND THE MAN from this period. Though very readable, his intellect is very much on display. He didn't put out a lot of material, but it was all ground-breaking stuff.
 
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