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Ok i have heard a few different opinion on this. Ive always been taught if you have to dry fire a rim fire put a dummy round in it. I would like to hear what everyone else has to say?
 

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Never Dry fire a rimfire ever. the firing pin will strike the edge of the chamber and damage the chamber or break the firing pin. It is a no no and anyone who says different has never paid a gunsmith to repair the chamber on his prize .22
 

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It really depends on the gun itself. A lot of the modern rimfire are made where they can be dry fired without risk of peening the edge of the chamber. The Ruger 10/22s are built this way. They have a short firing pin that is just long enough that it will set off the cartridges but not long enough to impact the edge of the chamber. However, a lot of older guns were not made this way and you can cause damage by dry firing them. If in doubt, don't dry fire a rimfire unless you use a snap cap. Some guys use a #6 screw anchor, the little plastic anchor you drive into sheetrock walls. Supposedly they fit perfectly in the chamber and give some cushion to the firing pin upon contact. I haven't tried it so I can's say for certain.
 

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I bought a Cricket .22LR for my daughter for XMAS, it said to use a fired cartridge to avoid damage for dry firing and practice. Well, only one problem. The case expands when fired and it got stuck when trying to insert it. So ... I decided she should practice with live ammo at the range instead.
 

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Plastic .22LR snap caps are inexpensive, and easy to use - except, of course, they turn a semi-auto into a straight-pull boltgun. ;)



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Plastic .22LR snap caps are inexpensive, and easy to use - except, of course, they turn a semi-auto into a straight-pull boltgun. ;)



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You should be able to take a knife and cut a small slot out of the snap cap so the extractor doesn't pick it up when you run the bolt back. That way you could recock the gun and snap over and over with out running a new one into the chamber each time.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Consult your owner's manual - never hurts to read directions, first :D

Having said that, I do not dry fire a rimfire unless I have exact information that it is safe to do so. All of my Rugers say so in the owner's manual. In fact, you have to dry fire a Ruger auto pistol to disassemble it.

It is certainly better to be cautious, than pay the repair bill......
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Agreed - don't ever dry fire a rimfire unless the owner's manual specifically says its OK.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your input guys, and jbee its alot more fun when its live fire ;)
 

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Never Dry fire a rimfire ever. the firing pin will strike the edge of the chamber and damage the chamber or break the firing pin. It is a no no and anyone who says different has never paid a gunsmith to repair the chamber on his prize .22
Absolutely the case, and I've seen a couple that required the chamber to be recut.

Working part time in a small shop, I saw more than a few of those. One rifle that came in wouldn't even chamber a round. The father brought the gun in, and complained that it wouldn't fire the first trip to the range. His yuppie larva must've dry fired the darned thing about 1000 times.
 

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Dang, I'm glad someone asked that, I had no idea you weren't supposed to dry fire a Rimfire. Thanks yote ' nut !!! Now i need to go look in the chamber of my 22Mag.
 

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The Ruger Semi-auto .22 pistols have a pin in the bolt that prevents the FP from striking the breech face. If it drops out when you remove the bolt for cleaning and you do not notice it......the next dry fire will damage the breech face.
I normally keep a box of fired cases for dry firing purposes. They must be cases that were fired in "that" gun, otherwise they will not fit.
About the cases that didn't work.....cases expand when fired, yes, but then they shrink a bit so that extraction is possible. If they don't rechamber, something else is going on; I have no trouble rechambering fired .22 brass in any of my rifles or pistols.
Pete
 

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I have a Winchester Model 60 (bolt action single shot) that has a slightly recessed bolt face. I just cut a small circle of some firm rubber that fits snugly in the bolt face for dry firing. Look over your rifle well and see if you can implement this idea. It is a lot cheaper than snap caps and lasts a lot longer.
 

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> The Ruger Semi-auto .22 pistols have a pin in the bolt

Yes, on the Ruger (1978 Mark I?) manual I downloaded, I saw that caution. So, I did not bother to remove the pin when I disassembled the gun for cleaning. I was surprised how much better I shot with such a low recoiling gun.

Plus, the front sight is a lot taller then my Ruger 944, I think that helps a lot.
 

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Consult your owner's manual - never hurts to read directions, first :D

Having said that, I do not dry fire a rimfire unless I have exact information that it is safe to do so. All of my Rugers say so in the owner's manual. In fact, you have to dry fire a Ruger auto pistol to disassemble it.

It is certainly better to be cautious, than pay the repair bill......
X2, good advise.
 

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Never Dry fire a rimfire ever...
I really hate the word "never."

Kimber's .22 conversion kit specifically says that dryfiring is perfectly fine. It's not really that difficult to machine a stop for a protrusion at the rear of a firing pin to hit something to safely stop it a few thousandths from the rim recess on a chamber.

It's just that MOST manufacturers don't do it. So, unless your owner's manual says differently, you SHOULD assume that you should not dryfire a rimfire excessively without a cushion of some type in place. Spent cases will work for a couple of shots but are a pain to rotate sometimes.

I have dryfired my Kimber hundreds if not thousands of times.
 

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Been dry firing every pistol and rifle rimfire and centerfire I've owned in the last few decades and I have a different point of view. That gun is a tool to help me become a better shooter. I dry fire the heck out of all of them. In all that time, I worked out a couple of chamber burrs, never broke a firing pin and never caused any major damage. It's my gun and I'll do exactly what I chose to do with it. If that requires repair later, then that's just a cost of becoming a good shot. I choose to lose sleep about something else, thanks!

A word of caution here. I do what I want with my property and so should you. Follow your conscience and if want to dry fire your rimfires or anything else then do it and don't worry about what anyone else thinks. Do NOT, however dry fire someone else's guns. They may get sorely ticked off. Respect their opinion and do as they ask when handling their guns.

Flash
 

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I never dry fire my rimfires ,centrefires or percussion locks,- Intentionally that is.However, how can you avoid Unintentional dry firing? The last time you pull the trigger is a dry fire. "Click" you are empy!
I would think that the gun is made to take such things.
Even so , I be care full with my rim fires!
 
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