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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on long term use in a Glock, but figured I'd share my thoughts on it's use in an AR so far.
This was a rifle I assembled early this year shortly after the new year. Short of the original couple magazines to test and flesh out and issues(prior to first cleaning), the rifle has exclusively had Fluid Film as it's only source of lubrication.

According to my box count a moment ago, I've put a little over 700 rounds through it. Here are some pictures of the more worn portions of the bolt:

Finger Bumper Gas Electronic device Auto part


Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Auto part Automotive wheel system


If you compare that top photo with the one below, you'll have an idea of how much I use to lubricate it after cleaning. Just a dab, then wipe with finger to leave a thin film.

Bumper Automotive exterior Material property Bag Auto part



For my money, I'm completely happy with it so far. I'm going to continue using it, and will probably begin changing over my bolt guns as well.

Cheers
 

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Looks like a pretty economic lubricant.

Good to know. Thanks.

Cheers!
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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How's it smell?

RJ
 

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I'm working on long term use in a Glock, but figured I'd share my thoughts on it's use in an AR so far.
This was a rifle I assembled early this year shortly after the new year. Short of the original couple magazines to test and flesh out and issues(prior to first cleaning), the rifle has exclusively had Fluid Film as it's only source of lubrication.

According to my box count a moment ago, I've put a little over 700 rounds through it. Here are some pictures of the more worn portions of the bolt:

View attachment 105642

View attachment 105641

If you compare that top photo with the one below, you'll have an idea of how much I use to lubricate it after cleaning. Just a dab, then wipe with finger to leave a thin film.

View attachment 105644


For my money, I'm completely happy with it so far. I'm going to continue using it, and will probably begin changing over my bolt guns as well.

Cheers

i don't have ARs, i played with the m16 enuff to last two lifetimes. i like dab of fluid film on the bolt carrier. i used military clp at the time and it was a dab and finger the clp on to bolt carrier. a dab will do ya!!!

i remember when the guys didn't have clp and they shot anyway.......for about 2 - 3 rounds, then the action was locked up and you had to find a dab of clp or motor oil to make shoot again. too much clp on the bolt carrier can cause problems too.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How's it smell?
A little like Dapper Dan. 🤣🤣🤣

Honestly for opening a gallon can, there is almost no smell at all. If you stick your face in the can, you'll know it's lanolin but it isn't egregious.

If you wanna try some, PM me an address and I'll send a little jar.

Cheers
 
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I have it in both bulk can and spray can, having used the spray can more for things other than guns. The spray tends to release a little more odor into the air, it's a 'sweet (not sweat!) smell', but not offensive. It's great stuff with a bunch of uses.
BTW, the spray can can get a little messy and get on other things, in addition to what you intended, so the can and rag, toothpick, cotton swab, etc. may be your better application choice for firearms and any 'fine placement' requirements.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I completely agree, and also have used both.

I've actually been using the bulk as my FL sizing lube for a bit over a year now.

A very LITTLE wiped on, is all you need. And you don't have to worry about your dies rusting, if you live in such a terrible humid environment as that. 😉😆

Cheers
 
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This is the same product that is used as a rust-preventing automobile undercoating?
If that is a question, the manufacturer lists that as an application, as it does for lawn mowers and other equipment such as snow plows, etc. It is a temporary coating though, not the typical permanent 'tar like' automobile undercoating that most of us 'old timers' grew up with.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is the same product that is used as a rust-preventing automobile undercoating?
Yes, and the same product JD dealers use to keep tractors shiney on their lots. 😉
 

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I know that this might be a WAG, but do you think that this would work as a spray bullet lube. I plan on picking up a can today from Lowe's and am going to give it a try as a sizing lube, but also have some cast bullets that might need a tiny bit more spray lube which I am out of.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I don't know what cast bullet lube is, so this is pure speculation.
Fluid Film is not thick or dry, like classic grease is; and it doesn't dry out. I don't think that's what you want in a cast lube, but I'm guessing.

If Lowes sells non-aerosol cans, that's the one you want for case lube. The aerosol cans aren't a easily dosed affair, more of a splattering affair.

Cheers
 
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JW, I don't think you will find FF to be a satisfactory bullet lube. My experience, in both areas (bullet lube and FF) puts me in agreement with Darkker, FF is way too messy (spray can for sure) and doesn't dry. Not only will you have it all over everything (if you spray bullets), I don't know how you could keep from contaminating the powder charge once you load them. If you try it, let us know your experience.
P.S. I do think you will love the stuff for many other applications!

P.P.S. To elaborate on Darkker's point. If you think of 'spray', in the traditional sense, as a fine mist (like spray paint), you'll find FF ain't that! I'd describe it as more of a 'spit and sputter' of large 'droplets'.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you think of 'spray', in the traditional sense, as a fine mist (like spray paint), you'll find FF ain't that! I'd describe it as more of a 'spit and sputter' of large 'droplets'.
Cottage cheese in a can!:LOL:
 

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I've used the stuff for non-firearm related stuff for a few years. Just today noticed my sons dog took an interest in a piece of metal coated with it.
She did NOT eat it, but she picked it up and moved it (showed interest).
My impression is, she was attracted by smell.

I always wondered why dogs enjoyed "rolling" in stuff that stinks. Right up until I tried it myself.
Now I like to roll in stuff that stinks!

Take care of your dogs. They are better friends than your friends sometimes!
 

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I'm working on long term use in a Glock, but figured I'd share my thoughts on it's use in an AR so far.
This was a rifle I assembled early this year shortly after the new year. Short of the original couple magazines to test and flesh out and issues(prior to first cleaning), the rifle has exclusively had Fluid Film as it's only source of lubrication.

According to my box count a moment ago, I've put a little over 700 rounds through it. Here are some pictures of the more worn portions of the bolt:

View attachment 105642

View attachment 105641

If you compare that top photo with the one below, you'll have an idea of how much I use to lubricate it after cleaning. Just a dab, then wipe with finger to leave a thin film.

View attachment 105644


For my money, I'm completely happy with it so far. I'm going to continue using it, and will probably begin changing over my bolt guns as well.

Cheers
From their web site:

"FLUID FILM® is a penetrant and lubricant also used for corrosion prevention. It is a non-toxic, long lasting, thixotropic liquid that has been used for over fifty years in the highly corrosive marine environment of ships and offshore drilling rigs. More recently they have been introduced and successfully utilized in the aerospace, aircraft and automobile industries as well as for home maintenance. Facilities where they are used include the following: government facilities, commercial fishing concerns, gas companies, agriculture, salt plants, municipal plants, power plants, manufacturing plants and pulp and paper mills.
FLUID FILM® is formulated from specially processed wool-wax, highly refined petroleum oils and selected agents to provide corrosion control, penetration, metal wetting and water displacement. The long lasting product contains no solvents, will not dry out and will penetrate to the base of all metals, providing corrosion protection from both natural and industrial atmospheres. Heavily corroded and/or frozen parts such as nuts, bolts, shafts, etc. that would normally be damaged during maintenance, can be salvaged by applying FLUID FILM®."

I used Fluid Film years ago as a lubricant and corrosion protectant. I liked the fact that it contained lanolin. I drifted away from its use for no particular reason. Since then, I heard that it no longer contained lanolin but two of its products still contain "wool wax" Fluid A and Fluid AR!

Smiles,
 
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