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This past Fall, I purchased about 100 persimmon tree seeds.
I am planning to get them started at my place in Eas Texas (Near Karnak, 10 miles East of Jefferson). From what I read, deer love Persimmons and they tend to drop fruit throughout the hunting season. Might even attract a few ferrule hogs.
The seedseller added a note saying that the seeds need to be stored in the fridge for 60 to 90 days, in order for them to be viable.
Well, a short while back I put about half of them in plastic cups and set them on a shelf in my utiltiy room. One sprouted about 2 weeks ago. Others are beginning to show signs of "awakening".
I am hoping to raise this batch at the house and plant them next year.
In a month or so, I will be bringing the rest of the seeds to my property where I will carefully select places for them to grow.
I don't expect more than 10% of the seeds to make it into viable trees, that's why I plan to raise some at home and then plant them next year when they are a foot or more tall.
Anyone else do something like this?

Bob Nisbet
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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I just cut six persimmon trees down in my yard. They do make a lot of fruit that attracts a lot of animals. Which is why I had to get rid of them. Each year the coyotes had a feast and a fight in the back yard over the persimmons. The deer ate the persimmons along with every shrub in the yard. Now I can walk behind my shop without stepping on rotten persimmons. yuck.....

I still have several in the pasture behind the house and watch deer feeding there during persimmon season.
 

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I used to climb an old persimmon tree that grew beside the fence when I was a child. When a good frost hits and the persimmons hit the ground, they are a delicious fruit. Shoot the deer and eat the persimmons too!

I wouldn't want hogs around though. Already have them hittin up my pasture in East Texas and it's not pretty. Might make for some fun hunting even though I would rather them stay gone.
 

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A neighbor friend of mine has 40 acres in southern Indiana with half a dozen or so persimmon trees on it. When that fruit is falling, deer will bed down within a couple hundred feet of those trees and he tells me that is the only time of the year they bed in that particular spot. Now, how he "knows" this, I have no idea, but the land has been in his family for a long time and he always manages to get a couple of does and sometimes a decent buck off that property, so maybe he's got it figured out.
 

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Persimmon trees are very slow growing & there are male & Female trees. They are excellent for all species of wildlife & make great Persimmon Pudding for people!:)
 

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The fruit of wild persimmon trees are much smaller than those of domesticated trees. Had a wild male tree on one side of the house in Pennsylvania and a wild female tree on the other side. Both near a hundred years old. The fruit is very astringent until after a heavy freeze then delicious. Unfortunately the male tree was destroyed this January when an arsonist burnt the house down.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Sorry to hear of the house loss, Irv. Hope there were no firearms lost in the fire.
 

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Deer will love the persimmons and as Jodum mentioned the coyotes will also. Here the fruit will ripen through september and probably fall in early october. Have to be ready to hunt early archery season to make use of it for hunting. When I am ready to hunt(usually mid-late october) the deer have moved on to acorns. Persimmons are a great wildlife attractant. I see the seeds in coyote droppings all across the farm(even by the house (why don't the dogs bark at them- they bark at everything else??)).
 

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Sorry to hear of the house loss, Irv. Hope there were no firearms lost in the fire.
The only 2 firearms (a Mossburg .22 and a Rem 1100 shotgun) I had there at the time were rescued by a friend after the first fire was extinguished after about half of the 8 bedroom house, (built in 1914 by my grandfather and great grandfather) was destroyed along with several generations of antiques and historical documents. After the firemen left the arsonist returned the next morning and relit the house destroying the rest of the structure and almost all of the contents, including several cases of competition shotshells and some hunting equipment. The arsonist has not yet been captured and this was the 6th house fire in the area ruled arson with several others ruled suspicious. There is a reward out for information leading to an arrest.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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They used to find a big tree with stout limbs for a situation like this. Again, sorry for your loss.
 

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I planted a couple dozen persimmon seeds 2 years ago, I don't know if they came up or not. If I can get a good mess of persimmons this year I want to have someone make some jelly for me.

I recall seeing a gunstock made of persimmon wood a year or two ago. Looked nice.
 

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We have a few persimin trees here, when the fruit is dropping my dogs will wait under the tree for them to hit the ground.
 

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i was bow hunting in texas, along the navasota river and came upon a tree loaded down with fruit. my buddy identified the tree as a persimmon. having always heard tales of how persimmons make you pucker up, i tenatively tried one. this was pre-frost. they don't just cause you to pucker up, they draw your face up so you can not even speak. several minutes elapsed before my mouth worked correctly.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Paw-Paw's are good for this wildlifer, too! Love them things.
 

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great choice.... If I had land to plant stuff for wildlife, persimmon trees would definitely
be on my list. They make a super duper deer attractant when ripened after the first frost.
Also, as mentioned above I have seen a lot of coyote droppings full of seeds.... In a few
years you should be enjoying the fuits of your planting!!!!!....good luck
 

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peach and plum

peaches and plums are practically nuisance plants in east texas. if i was planting fruit trees i would include some of these.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
This past fall I got around a hundred seeds and so far only one had started growing.
I was told that the seeds need to spend 2 months in the fridge, and was successful at convincing my wife to let me do that. Every time she opened the fridge I got a reminder!!
I am beginning to be concerned that most of the seeds may never sprout.
If any of you would be willing to send me a handful (or so) of seeds, I would be glad to pay the postage.
Thanks,
Bob Nisbet (Displaced Texan)
U.S. Army Research & Technology Protection Center
Supporting Army Aviation
Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898
ffice: 256-876-1939
Cell: 256-797-4152
 

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Discussion Starter #19
After getting only one seed to germinate out of 50, I decided I needed to improve my chances of having some viable trees. About 5 weeks ago I purchased 20 bare root trees from a guy in TN. Put them in the ground same day they arrived, to make sure they didn't dry out.
Been a good 4 weeks and every tree around here has leafed out, except for the persimmons.
Anyone got any ideas how long I should wait before placing a BAD eBay report.
I a very concerned abouty the trees not being actively growing by now. It has been in the high 70s and low 80s for a week or two.
Bob Nisbet
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Transplants seem to go into shock and have a "set-back" for some time after being replanted. Think I'd wait several months to check for results.

Put some Live Oak acorns in the wife's flower bed several years ago and had a couple come up the following spring. Transplanted the seedlings and they eventually died. Just this winter noticed one sprouting in the bed. That's 3 years after planting! I wouldn't give up on the seeds you put in last fall. They'll probably sprout this year or next.
 
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