Shooters Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Many people like Rugers, price, durability etc, but they want the Ruger to have a S&W like trigger.

There are ways to improve the trigger without taking it to a gunsmith. I added lighter weight Wolff spring and trigger shims

I would post all the pictures here, but my photobucket account is maxed out, follow this link.

TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: Trigger job for a Ruger
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,781 Posts
Browsing through the link convinces me this should be posted as a "Sticky" to help folks now and in the future. Thanks for posting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Very good but I need to explain about a weaker hammer spring. Accuracy can go clear to pot if the primer is not struck with proper force. Not noticed at close HD ranges of course. Shooting ranges from 50 to 200 meters and even to 500 meters with revolvers showed a marked loss of accuracy as hammer springs weakened. I changed them every year. Then went to Wolfe over power springs. I use 26# variable springs in SA revolvers, Ruger and BFR's. Important in a DA since the hammer has less distance before release.
Then there is hammer bounce from internal pressure on the primer. Slow motion can show a hammer going to near full cock on any revolver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
The Ruger SRH has a great trigger at the start but the RH has one spring for both the trigger and hammer. Abortion.
The SA also can be a problem with a short transfer bar if you go too light on the trigger. You will get hang fires or failures as the bar drops off the pin. I make my own transfer bars so I get from 19 oz to 1-1/2#. I can beat a S&W trigger with a Ruger. But not the one spring models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Thanks for this sticky.

I've done very similar work on 6 or 7 Rugers over the years - all yielded noticeable improvement, and no problems (except 1 noted below) While I've got the mainspring off the hammer strut, I usually polish the strut and the rounded nub at the top with crocus cloth. Probably doesn't make a huge difference, but it sure can't hurt. I've often polished the engagement points of the hammer and sear with a very hard, very flat gage block stone to smooth burrs or unevenness on the flat edges of the hammer/sear engagement. It makes the break a little cleaner. Don't do it if you don't understand exactly what you're doing, though.

One caution, and I think Wolff includes it in their instructions: lighter springs make the DA pull "feel" a lot better, but you can easily overdo it and get soft primer strikes. In my GP-100, the two softest mainsprings would give an occasional FTF. And if you're getting some FTF's, not only are you giving up reliability, you're probably not getting best accuracy.

Maybe everyone knows this already, but if you're doing it for the first time, it's worth paying attention to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
I have used Pepsodent toothpaste on the mating surfaces and dry fired until one hand was worn out replace the toothpaste and dry fired until the other hand was worn out.
That mates the parts by polishing them and also strengthens your trigger finger. :) It does smooth the pull considerably.
I have to get some Pepsodent for my GP100 but it is already a pretty good trigger compared to what my Security-Six started with. After 45 years of use it's like glass now. It won't take much to get the GP100 at the same point.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top