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Some of you might have heard of older guys telling of making cross cuts in lead bullet cartridges. It was supposed to make expansion. Has anybody ever done this in handgun cartridges?
 

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Noticed a Youtube video that showed using a phillips screwdriver to mark a sort of "X" on .22 rimfire bullets. Expansion was the explanation. Don't think I bothered to watch this video. Seems to me that any such thing would detract from accuracy rather than help in expansion. Back in the day, lots of men were killed with the old .45 Colt shooting plain lead slugs thrown by blackpowder.
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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We used to do it as young boys. We experimented with everything shootable. The cross cut 22 LRs would difinately make a bigger hole than just a solid point. I can remember trying it on boards, bones and watermelons.
 

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Same here, Jodum. I ringed shotshells, crossed bullets, swaged phillips head hollow points, shot arrow and 45-70 from .410 shotguns and made my own BP for blowing things up.
Some called the crossed bullets 'Dum Dum's but that's not right. That was a another thing altogether and worth reading about.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I used to do that with 22's to make a bigger hole in gophers, then I discovered that a 50 grain from a .222 Rem made an even bigger hole and as they say "The rest is history".

Handgun bullets no, I've never done it to handgun bullets. I'm not sure of the "legalities" of it. Seems I heard that it wasn't "legal" but I may be wrong.

RJ
 

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roverboy,

I have tried X cuts and found a much better solution using the Forster hollow pointing tool in a drill press on loaded ammo. Tool self centers well with a drill press and is depth adjustable and inexpensive too:

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/371968/forster-universal-hollow-pointer-1-8

I have used it successfully on RN, FN, SWC and spire bullets chucked in a drill press on slow speed for LOADED ammo only. Just bring it down slow and let it self center before firmly holding the brass case to slow cut the HP to the depth you have set on the tool itself.

Gary
 

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We used to do it as young boys.
It was supposed to do something, I forget what, but it also didn't make much difference shooting blackbirds in the new seed.

I did a lot of dumba$$ stuff as a kid, I'd forgotten about that one. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
One guy I used to work with, told me about cutting into .45 acp 230 gr. fmj with a hacksaw. Said it did expand.
 

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Heard of it a long time (decades) ago. Has anyone compared the accuracy of the cut bullets with uncut ones and hollowpoints from the same munufacturer?
 

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Bear Bio-- DumDum arsenal was said to have used a pig-based grease in their paper 'cartridges' that required the troop to bite the end off to start the process of loading. The muslims found out about it and that's what started the Sepoy mutiny.
Or, that was the version of history I was taught by reading it somewhere.

I heard the term 'dum dum bullets' from a movie about gangsters so I assume the term was miss-appropriated by the press of the day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Rebellion_of_1857
 

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Bear Bio-- DumDum arsenal was said to have used a pig-based grease in their paper 'cartridges' that required the troop to bite the end off to start the process of loading. The muslims found out about it and that's what started the Sepoy mutiny.
Or, that was the version of history I was taught by reading it somewhere.

I heard the term 'dum dum bullets' from a movie about gangsters so I assume the term was miss-appropriated by the press of the day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Rebellion_of_1857
I think I remember reading somewhere that a DumDum bullet was one that was set up in such a way that it would begin to tumble after striking it's target therefore doing lots of damage. Not sure how it was set up to do that. DumDum was also because it was kind of unstable and could go just about any way and may or may not hit target.
 

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DumDum was an East India Company arsenal in the mid 1800s and their rumored use of pig and beef fat as bullet lube was blamed for the war of 1847 in that part of the world.
There are still people that call any soft point bullet a 'dumdum' because it's designed to expand, not because it's greasy. :)

BIG EDIT

This is at wikipedia-
Etymology
During the 19th century the area was home to the Dum Dum Arsenal, a British Royal Artillery armoury, where, in the early 1890s, Captain Neville Bertie-Clay developed a bullet with the jacket cut away at the tip to reveal its soft lead core (see hollow-point bullet), known informally as a dum-dum,[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] or more correctly as an expanding bullet. The previous name of Dumdum was "Domdoma".
 
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Tried "modifying" bullets when I was a kid with various degrees of success. Now that I'm grown up, I just buy bullets that are actually designed to do what I want.
 

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I heard the term 'dum dum bullets' from a movie about gangsters so I assume the term was miss-appropriated by the press of the day.
NO WAY! Not the press. :(

Tried "modifying" bullets when I was a kid with various degrees of success. Now that I'm grown up, I just buy bullets that are actually designed to do what I want.
Yeah, but it was great being young, even if it did notta for bullet performance. :)
 

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Sepoy mutiny was caused by rumors, mainly false, that stated the British government was using a pig AND beef based bullet lube on rifle cartridges that angered the religious feelings of the muslim and hindu/Sikh populations of india.


The DUM DUM bullet as a term originates with the Dum Dum Arsenal in India. they made the first JACKETED SOFT POINT. yes, a jacketed soft point. all they did was modify the copper jacket on the .303 bullet so that it had an exposed lead tip.
Basically the original patent for Remington core lokt jacketed soft point.

What SOLDIERS did was simply take a file to their standard issue FMJ service ammunition, and file the tip down to no more then 1 mm exposed lead circle. From the modern attempts at reproducing, that stuff OPENS up big time.

Box of truth did testing on cutting an x into the bullets nose. most of the time is simply made bullets split into fragments. ALOT of the recovered slugs showed that the splitting followed the depth of the cut made and never went past.

Its somewhat useless really.

Just get a good semi jacketed hollow point
 

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I cut some lead .45 Colt and .44-40 as a young teen. Fired into a water vfilled 55 gallon drum from 3 feet they did expand. Never did sny other testing or use though.
 

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My friends and I would do it with 22 RF when we were youngsters, it seemed to increase expansion on rabbits, but that might have just been our wishful thinking.

SMOA
 

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There were ways of making .22LR hollow points making BIGGER holes :eek: but not sure about posting them here though. A drop of ether in the base of your air rifle pellet before loading made a real "go faster" pellet.
Things you do when you were young and stupid, probably just old and stupid now, but not quite as bad.
 
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