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I never had a gun in that category but I enjoy the art and craftsmanship of them.
I happened to be in New Britain CT a while back and had the pleasure of viewing dozens of beautiful specimens, mostly shotguns at Connecticut Shotgun (connecticutshotgun.com).
Tony Galazan accomplished what many thought would be impossible in this day and age especially with the challenges of the economy.
It was a pleasure to drool over the merchandise.
 

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Heck yes. Most of my guns are shooters, but on some of them the collector value is way more than the shooting value. Case in point, I own a stone mint Royal Blue Colt Python with the original box. When I bought it, it was just another nice 357. Now it's worth thousands and even a little wear would knock hundreds off its value. I have other nice 357s to shoot, so it's not going to go hunting anytime in the foreseeable future.

"No safe queens" is fine as a general rule, but you should pay attention to what's going on with collector value and make the switch when called for. If you can't stand having a gun you don't use hard, then sell it to a collector and buy three or four shooters with the money.
 

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No. What is the point of owning a gun you don't shoot? Very few firearms are collectible. Saying a gun is a good investment is like saying a truck is a good investment. Some firearms may hold their value over time, almost zero firearms will appreciate in value over time. And Sorry, no offense but there has never been built a collectible Remington 700.
Here is a gun values book hypothetical: 1985 Remington 700 unfired, NIB, value $600 . 1985 Remington 700 90% condition, value $575.
I have some cool old guns, for example a 1918 built Remington model 14 in 35 Rem, Deluxe grade with 25lpi checkered french walnut, checkered steel buttplate, factory Lyman 38 sight in 90% condition. My wife gave it to me for my 60th b-day and it has great sentimental value. I baby it to be sure, cast bullets and mild jacketed loads, but it is a favorite in the hunting woods primarily because of what it is.
 

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Strikes me as the same as:
"Ever bought a TV you didn't want to plug-in?"
 

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I am a hunter so all my guns hunt. Even my 303 jungle carbine. I have a 1905 Mannlicher Schoenauer that will be 100 years old next year and it loves to hunt. Never seen a gun too pretty to hunt and if I did I wouldn't own it.
 

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I have a couple I don’t want to scratch ,one day I might get them out but I hate carrying any tool that makes me concentrate on taking extra care in case they get scratched.
They don’t need to be shiny to work as expected.
Makes a big difference on what sort of hunting or shooting you are doing.

cheers
 

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I've shot doves with Purdeys, quail with August Francottes and sporting clays with Westley Richards and my regular big game rifle is worth more than the total of my vehicles. I love REALLY good guns and use them as they should be used and for what they were made for originally.
Are you more careful when tromping though the pheasant patch with a twenty thousand dollar shotgun? You bet, but the enjoyment is worth it.
The one thing I wont do is shoot an unfired collector gun.
 
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I've shot doves with Purdeys, quail with August Francottes and sporting clays with Westley Richards and my regular big game rifle is worth more than the total of my vehicles. I love REALLY good guns and use them as they should be used and for what they were made for originally.
Are you more careful when tromping though the pheasant patch with a twenty thousand dollar shotgun? You bet, but the enjoyment is worth it.
The one thing I wont do is shoot an unfired collector gun.
I honestly don’t think about it when actually hunting. Now when crossing fences or getting in and out of tree stands yes I am more conscious and carefull. Sometimes while sitting or waiting I just admire them or caress them gently. I don’t collect guns but am cognizant of the fact I am only a caretaker until I pass them on for the next person to use and enjoy. I do find myself wondering sometimes about past owners and how they cared for them. Personally I love older guns the older the better as long as they are safe and function properly. Nothing like hunting with a small piece of history in your hands.
 

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That is one of the reasons that I never have gotten a Ruger #1. I've had the opportunity to obtain about 3, but knew that I would never carry them afield. I bought a Ruger American to hunt with. This is also why I've never wanted to buy a new pickup truck either. My pickups are always fairly beat up when I buy them so I don't worry about them at all.
 

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More I think about this the more I think I am taking the wrong angle , I am thinking I should scope up my precious go clear some blackberries and club some dear to death with it .
Figuratively speaking of course.
Unless I can figure a way to take them with me .

cheers.
 

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yes I have one and hate that I don't use it
it's a model 70 super grade and its very nice never want to use it
that's the problem guns aren't pictures painted to be hung on the wall and looked at
IMO
 

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yes I have one and hate that I don't use it
it's a model 70 super grade and its very nice never want to use it
that's the problem guns aren't pictures painted to be hung on the wall and looked at
IMO
My son has one with the Maple stock and I told him when he bought it that gun is just too pretty to hunt. He replied by dropping a 180 lb 6 point first time he took it hunting. Stands out nicely too when laying across the deer for pictures.
 

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Oldpost....but to be simpleabout it:
es...I owned and used rifles too nice for any kind of rough use....but I used them anyway.
 

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Hunting with an antique that you bought new is always good. Some don't live long enough to do it.
 

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Another thread on here got me to thinking about nice guns. That thread is about an original Low Wall in pristine condition for sale on Gunbroker. Looking at it, it truly is a work of art and craftmanship. If you owned something like that would you take it out and shoot it much? Would you hunt with it at all?

Bought a 3 band Sharp's musket decades ago. it had been built within 500 of the Berdan run. The bands were engraved so it was a presentation rifle. I did get around to loading 58 rounds for it, but never shot it.


I have a model 54 that I saved for a friend (rusted up), but it's so sweet, it's now my brush rifle. An old buddy that I fixed a Thompson for and his M14 gave me a pristine 03, I turned around and gave it to my friend that gave me the Model 54. It's sweet, it's in very nice shape, but it is a shooter and I love it. Slickest bolt action I've ever shot with.
 

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A twist on the question is -- Do you have a gun you retired because it's now too nice to shoot?

Yes, several that should be sold but just keep getting more valuable so it's hard to turn them into vaporous cash. I'll never be able to own another Kornbrath engraved Hoffman Arms .375 express rifle or a hand detachable sidelock August Francotte double, either. ....engraved M94 Win rifle....Browning Trombone? Too painful to contemplate.
 

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If some one have me a limited edition collector/comemrative I'd darn sure shoot it. What good would it be?

That said, I wouldn't go buy "one of one thousand" either.

RJ
 

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Have owned and shot over 2500 different firearms including Blackpowder, Antiques, & Modern.
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In the late 70's I was lucky enough to get my hands on one of these in the wood transit chest, with the matching scope, in unfired condition. https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2011/12/22/the-british-no-4-t/
I had it for two years and could never bring myself to fire it. Regrettably I sold it. Please note I had a collection of many Enfield's so I was not lacking in shoulder bruising from Mark VII Ball. Even had a few .22LR Enfield Trainers for fun!
 
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